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Old 08-17-2011, 08:26 AM   #1
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Nursery Remodel


Hello all. Long time lurker, first time poster.

Here is my situation. I am currently remodeling our nursery for our first born (due 12/29). One side of our house is a very old, im guess early 1900's farmhouse while the other is relatively new (1970's). The old farmhouse side is constructed with true oak 2x4 studs and oak sheathing.

After ripping out the old plaster and lath, I found out that the oak studs are not only not plumb but also have many crowns. So far I have sistered modern 2x4's to achieve as straight a wall for drywall but i have one corner that is giving me problems. Basically, i have to somehow shave one of the oak studs because most of it bows out past the new modern 2x4 pine studs.

How would i go about shaving back the crown on this oak stud? I have thought about just using a belt sander with very rough sandpaper or even taking to it with a chisel and hammer. Any other recommendations?

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Old 08-17-2011, 09:50 AM   #2
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You are on the right track---if you have a sister in place as a referenced then use what eve tools you own to remove the extra wood.

A Saws All with Milwaukee blades is helpful---notch the wood face and chisel off the chunks--

A Multi tool would be helpful --but the petrified oak might make for a short blade life.(and they are expensive)

If you are considering buying one look at the Harbor Freight ones---They have the cheapest blades and work quite well.

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Old 08-17-2011, 10:17 AM   #3
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The multi-tool sounds like a good idea. I may have to check those out...

Thanks...
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Old 08-17-2011, 10:36 AM   #4
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They are surprisingly handy----That tool joined the tool pile a year ago---I thought it would be a one time specialty tool----Wrong!

That comes out of the truck two or three times a week.

Yesterday it removed some 2x4s that were in the way of a new medicine cabinet ----then helped remove rotten exterior trim boards that were trapped behind some good ones.

Handy ---Mike----
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:38 PM   #5
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Another question regarding my ongoing nursery remodel.

Two of the walls adjoin rather noisy areas of the house. One wall adjoins the stairs leading to the 2nd floor and the other wall adjoins the family room.

Would there be anything wrong with insulating those interior walls in an attempt to help keep noise down in the nursery? I am already going to be doing some weatherstriping on the door and though this might help somewhat.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
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Old 09-21-2011, 10:27 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironman70 View Post
Another question regarding my ongoing nursery remodel.

Two of the walls adjoin rather noisy areas of the house. One wall adjoins the stairs leading to the 2nd floor and the other wall adjoins the family room.

Would there be anything wrong with insulating those interior walls in an attempt to help keep noise down in the nursery? I am already going to be doing some weatherstriping on the door and though this might help somewhat.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
There have been a few threads here regarding insulating interior walls for sound, and if I recall, the general consensus was that it doesn't work.
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Old 09-25-2011, 05:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironman70 View Post
Another question regarding my ongoing nursery remodel.

Two of the walls adjoin rather noisy areas of the house. One wall adjoins the stairs leading to the 2nd floor and the other wall adjoins the family room.

Would there be anything wrong with insulating those interior walls in an attempt to help keep noise down in the nursery? I am already going to be doing some weatherstriping on the door and though this might help somewhat.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
As a mother of 4 children I'll encourage you not to bother to protect your sleeping infant from sounds from the beginning. Just don't care - your infant will sleep regardless. . . as the child grows they will stay adjusted to the sounds of life. Right now they're already adjusting to routine noises and sounds like dogs barking and your talking.

I made great efforts to keep our first son in quiet when he was sleeping only to have him struggle with sleep issues at night as he grew older and because of more children and things like trains having a quiet home became less possible - he eventually adjusted after several years.

By the time our youngest was born there was no such thing as being able to keep the house quiet with 3 other children in the house and a zillion pets and he sleeps sound - we've even been able to vacuum in the room with him sleeping without it waking him up.

Now - on actual sound-barriers. Some science: sound waves travel best through solid materials so the molecules have room to vibrate and carry the sound molecule to molecule. The more dense the material - the less room for vibration - the better than sound barrier when it comes to having *something solid* being a barrier. So extremely solid partitions like thick oak vibrate less and thus transmit less sound.

But you can't hang 3" thick oak slats all over nor can you fill your walls with sand like some people do for suburban sound-studios when they're too cheap for foam materials. . .

So then comes in the science of absorption: loosely packed materials absorb the waves, don't vibrate and transmit due to their arrangement, nor do they provide an echo - but that usually involves caking your walls with absorbent materials on the outside to absorb the sound waves.

So then comes air, being actually a poor conductor of sound waves over long distance by itself. Thus: Having a false wall that is not attached to your real wall and therefor has a cavity of air in between to inhibit the sharing of vibration is another option.

But after all these options the easiest thing is to just not bother, let your child adjust to life (as he/she already is doing right now) and this ensures less interruptions in your nights in the future.

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