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-   -   Is my approach to removing these medicine cabinets right? (pic) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/my-approach-removing-these-medicine-cabinets-right-pic-10248/)

joeyboy 07-29-2007 01:17 PM

Is my approach to removing these medicine cabinets right? (pic)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Okay, our bathroom has these mirror/medicine cabinets that are recessed in the wall, above the sink/toilet.


The plan is to remove those, reinstall them on the opposite wall, and put a large mirror on the wall where the cabinets were originally (somehow ended up with a mirror whose dimensions fit damn near flush, both vert/horizontally!).

So, I think I'm all set with installing the big mirror, and won't be re-installing the medicine cabinets just yet, but I want to make sure I'm approaching the removal of these cabinets appropriately:

1) unscrew them and remove from wall
2) cut the wall so that I have 1 large rectangular hole, with studs at the end
3) cut plywood to fit the hole (plywood would be primed or waterproofed)
4) screw plywood into the studs
5) use spackling putty to seal the edges of the plywood
6) install mirror (which will cover that whole section)

Is this about right?

Sammy 07-29-2007 01:48 PM

That will work but a couple of scrap peices of drywall and a little mud, you could have filled in the area without cutting the studs. And it would be semi finished if you decided later to take the mirror down.

Ron6519 07-29-2007 01:49 PM

Why don't you use sheetrock? Cut to size, tape and compound.
You can use plywood if you want. Just remove the plaster that's between the medicine cabinets now and put one large sheet of ply. You might have to put cleats at either end to use as nailers.
Ron

joeyboy 07-29-2007 02:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 55123)
That will work but a couple of scrap peices of drywall and a little mud, you could have filled in the area without cutting the studs. And it would be semi finished if you decided later to take the mirror down.

I was gonna use plywood because I *thought* I had some chunks that were the right size, but don't. Although maybe I'll just patch a few together to save a trip to home depot (I'm also realizing that I need them to be the same thickness as the current wall, which is unlikely, I think they're 3/4" plywood sheets).

If I get a sheet of dry wall, you say use the 'mud' - is
"proform, all purpose joint compound" an acceptable type of mud? I for some reason have a bucket of that, and I have some spackling compound.

What do you mean by 'cutting the studs'? I wasn't going to cut anything, just remove the cabinets, cut out that little strip between them, then cut my (drywall or plywood) to fit the hole, and screw it into the exposed studs.

joeyboy 07-29-2007 02:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 55124)
Why don't you use sheetrock? Cut to size, tape and compound.
You can use plywood if you want. Just remove the plaster that's between the medicine cabinets now and put one large sheet of ply. You might have to put cleats at either end to use as nailers.
Ron

May just get the sheetrock if the plywood is too thick, I just wanted to use extra materials, and save a trip to home depot. If I use sheetrock, what do you mean by tape? Wouldn't I just cut the sheetrock precisely, put in the hole, screw it in, and then compound?

Also, you say that for using ply, I may need to put cleats on either end. I wiki'd it to see what you meant, and it seems like it's just to make something longer to fit - wouldn't that be unnecessary if my cuts were on point?

redline 07-29-2007 02:44 PM

What is the total length and width of the opening? (both mirrors)

What is th size of the mirror (length and width)?

joeyboy 07-29-2007 03:01 PM

The opening (if cut precisely around both of the medicine cabinets) is 33" wide X 22" tall.

My mirror is 47" wide X 43" tall - I got this for free from someone who was moving and it just happens to fit damn near flush on that wall ******BUT, when I was taking those measurements a second ago, I figured I'd whip out my square - the wall/ceiling aren't square with each other!!!!! :censored: The mirror is gonna be a pretty flush piece, which is just gonna accentuate how non-square the upper corner is!!

Sammy 07-29-2007 03:02 PM

Joint compund would be the same as "mud" and be used to tape and fill the joints if you do it in drywall.

Finish it off just like your repairing some damaged drywall.

joeyboy 07-29-2007 03:02 PM

(sorry if I implied the mirror fit flush over the medicine cabinets, I meant that it fits flush on that wall - it's got like an inch of clearance on all sides from the walls, ceiling, sink, etc)

Dansbell 07-29-2007 05:39 PM

If you want to use your plywood and are not concerned with what it looks like behind the mirror you could install cleats 1/4" back on each stud and cut two pieces of plywood to fill each hole and sit flush with the dry wall.

Personally just knowing I didn't fix the wall behind my mirror would bother me. It is really easy and not very expensive to throw a piece of dry wall up there.

joeyboy 07-29-2007 08:22 PM

I'm likely to just go the drywall route, I'm pretty sure my plywood's gonna be too thick anyways....


Could someone please clarify this whole 'cleating' thing to me? Or point me somewhere with info on it? Wiki didn't give me much of anything. I guess, based on my amateur DIY approach, that I think all I need to do is make sure my replacement piece, be it plywood or drywall, needs to fit damn near flush, and then i just spackle/tape/joint compound the tiny gap. I just am failing to see where cleating woudl come in, and what benefits it'd offer to this...


As I stated above, kinda sucks that the ceiling/wall intersection isn't a true square, I know since it's a horizontal mirror i'm gonna want to align it with the ceiling (it's largest edge), but dunno what to about the non-linear gap I'm gonna end up with on the side....

MinConst 07-29-2007 09:14 PM

joeyboy,
By cleating Ron meant goes like this. When you take out the medicine cabinets the left and right edges of them are right up to the studs. Sheetrock is covering the studs so when you place a new piece of rock in the hole there will be no place to fasten the left and right edges to. Adding a cleat (a piece of 2x4) to the edge of the existing stud will give you that place to fasten to. Also you want to tape the joints so they don't crack later. All this is the normal way to patch sheet rock. As for the uneven ceiling/wall you might be able to add a piece of molding on the top to kind of conceal the line.

joeyboy 07-30-2007 10:57 AM

OHHHHH okay I get cleating now. I guess I was planning to cut a little bit into the sheet rock past the cabinets, to screw into their studs, but that sounds quite a bit easier lol, so big thanks on that.



Now, about using the moulding, how would that make a difference? If the molding is there or not, the ceiling still raises upwards as it gets farther from the right wall (the upper right angle is >90).

joeyboy 07-30-2007 01:18 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Okay, cleating is gonna be a lifesaver here lol! Thanks again, that'll make it so much easier!!

So I just removed the cabinets, and the strip of drywall (or sheetrock?) that was between them, and got a few new questions.

- for the cleats, should I just do 1 vertical cleat at each edge, or should I also do horizontal ones at the top bottom?

- the second picture shows the middle stud pieces used for holding the medicine cabinet in - the one to the left looks kinda crappy, should I remove it, or give it a water resistant coating or something?

- Just want to make sure I've got the right idea for the rest of the project:
-- get drywall/sheetrock that's the appropriate thickness, cut precisely
-- primer for the sheetrock
-- put up my cleats (either verticals only, or verticals + horizontals)
-- Screw (or nail?) the sheetrock into place
-- spackle/mud the gaps around the edge of the sheetrock/drywall



Am I doing this about right?

joeyboy 07-30-2007 01:19 PM

(note - that red tape is covering this hole in the wall - it was covered with gray duct tape when I removed the cabinet, I removed the tape, saw it was a hole in teh wall, didn't see any major signs of rot/infestation or anything, so I just re-taped it very thoroughly)


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