Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-31-2008, 06:34 PM   #1
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Share |
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Okay, we discovered that the "handyman" that installed our tub and surround didn't do it right, and water was getting behind the surround and running down the corner of where the tub meets the wall.

Today I removed the surround and cut away the molded rock. Most of the framing is fine, except for where the water was running down the corner to the floor and around the corner (floor not level).

Here's my question: Can I just treat this mold? Or will I have to replace it?











Attached Thumbnails
Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-1.jpg   Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-2.jpg   Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-3.jpg   Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-4.jpg  

__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 06:36 PM   #2
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


btw, this is what the rock looked like...



Attached Thumbnails
Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-5.jpg   Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-6.jpg  

__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 06:41 PM   #3
Building and plumbing
 
USP45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: farmville, VA
Posts: 244
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Do yourself a favor, replace it. Place some bleach in a spray bottle and spray a mist of bleach so as not to disturb the mold. What little disturbance you created removing the rock is fine, but mist the remaining and remove, then replace. From the pix there is too much damage for it to clear up IMO.

TIP: When replacing the sheetrock, leave it up about 1/2" off the tub. Put the new surround all the way to the tub. Caulk the joint where the surround meets the tub. If the sheetrock touchs the tub and water gets behind the surround the rock will act as a wick and suck the water up.

Last edited by USP45; 03-31-2008 at 06:44 PM.
USP45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 08:07 PM   #4
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by USP45 View Post
Do yourself a favor, replace it. Place some bleach in a spray bottle and spray a mist of bleach so as not to disturb the mold. What little disturbance you created removing the rock is fine, but mist the remaining and remove, then replace. From the pix there is too much damage for it to clear up IMO.

TIP: When replacing the sheetrock, leave it up about 1/2" off the tub. Put the new surround all the way to the tub. Caulk the joint where the surround meets the tub. If the sheetrock touchs the tub and water gets behind the surround the rock will act as a wick and suck the water up.
Thanks for the tip. I think that is exactly what happened in the first place.

So if I am going to need to replace the framing, I was thinking about trying to just cut out the damaged portions. This is obviously not load bearing (its not origional to the house).

I want to leave the tub and just unscrew it from the framing of that wall. I used paint to illustrate the pics of what I would remove and replace.
Attached Thumbnails
Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-1-2.jpg   Mold on framing of bathroom wall-bath-2-2.jpg  
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2008, 05:57 AM   #5
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Any other advice anyone can offer?
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2008, 02:55 PM   #6
Building and plumbing
 
USP45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: farmville, VA
Posts: 244
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Looks fine as long as it can be secured tightly so as not to have any play when you try to move the wood from side to side or front to rear. If there is any wobble after replacing then you may be able to install metal plates across the cuts to stiffen them. These can be had at any lumber yard. They come in different lenths and widths.
USP45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 12:11 PM   #7
weekend warrior
 
Hobb3s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 92
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


I wouldn't use bleach to remediate the mold, it's not a recommended practice.
http://www.ecamold.com/pages/bleach.html
Basically, it won't necessary kill the mold, just hide it, and it could do you more harm than good.

For small amounts of mold a simple dish soap and water mixture is good to remove it from the surface. Then the most crucial thing is to dry the area out, and remove the source of moisture to prevent new growth.

For larger amounts, replacing the wood a suggested is a good idea considering how porous it is.
Hobb3s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 01:35 PM   #8
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobb3s View Post
I wouldn't use bleach to remediate the mold, it's not a recommended practice.
http://www.ecamold.com/pages/bleach.html
Basically, it won't necessary kill the mold, just hide it, and it could do you more harm than good.

For small amounts of mold a simple dish soap and water mixture is good to remove it from the surface. Then the most crucial thing is to dry the area out, and remove the source of moisture to prevent new growth.

For larger amounts, replacing the wood a suggested is a good idea considering how porous it is.
How much is considered "a larger amount"?

I haven't gotten to working on this yet, but I cleaned the area with soap and water and sprayed it with a disenfectant/mold INHIBITOR that also claimed to get rid of the odors caused by mold. I did this just for the time being until I could start replacing it...

But when I was finished cleaning it and put a fan on it overnight, it looks alot better than it did! I am considering not replacing the framing, but I think at this point it would be good insurance to replace.
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 02:24 PM   #9
weekend warrior
 
Hobb3s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 92
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyAndy View Post
How much is considered "a larger amount"?

I haven't gotten to working on this yet, but I cleaned the area with soap and water and sprayed it with a disenfectant/mold INHIBITOR that also claimed to get rid of the odors caused by mold. I did this just for the time being until I could start replacing it...

But when I was finished cleaning it and put a fan on it overnight, it looks alot better than it did! I am considering not replacing the framing, but I think at this point it would be good insurance to replace.
No washing, sanding, scraping, or other surface cleaning will remove all mold spores from wood where mold was previously found. It is unlikely that most construction materials, even when new, are free of mold spores, nor is "zero mold" a reasonable nor possible objective. Cleaning moldy framing lumber followed by application of a sealant may be the most cost effective alternative (where removal of the lumber is cost-prohibitive or otherwise not possible). While lumber replacement with apparently "clean" new lumber may sound appealing, it is likely to be cost prohibitive and in fact may include its own mold when it is unloaded at the work site.
Unless framing lumber has been actually damaged, such as by rot, replacing it due to mold contamination is not justified and would be improper.
Hobb3s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 03:12 PM   #10
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,843
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


First, bleach WILL kill mold spores. It is an accepted method and even the recommended method in healthcare settings.
Second, unless somebody in your household suffers from asthma, severe respiratory ailments or allergies, has an immune system deficiency or is being treated for cancer, then don't overreact to the presence of mold.
The problem with porous materials such as wood or the paper backing on drywall is that the mold colony will send out mycelium (roots) in search of food. Removing the mold on the surface and killing all of the spores will solve the mold problem, provided that the area is kept dry. If it once again reaches a level of moisture that can support mold growth, the mycelia will produce a new colony of mold and the process starts over again. It is impossible to eliminate all of the mold spores from any given place in your home. Most molds need a few things to thrive, a food source (paper, dust, drywall, wood), moisture, and to a certain degree temperature. That is why you seldom if ever find mold in your freezer, but do find it in your refrigerator. That said, the best you can do is remove the moisture or the food source. Mold resistant drywalls do this by eliminating the paper. If you have sanded off the mold, then seal the wood. Kilz primer is one that the local mold remediation instructor recommends. You should really vac everything up with a HEPA vac. Mold spores won't pass through a HEPA filter. I always laugh at those "Deadly Mold" ads that try to get you to buy some magic formula or some mold test kit. Mold spores are everywhere. Want a small dose? pour ranch dressing on your salad. Want a large dose? Spread mulch around your flowers. This is one of those things that an over active media has blown way out of proportion and has not provided very factual information. Even some internet sites are loaded with half truths trying to sell magic mold killer.
Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 05:10 PM   #11
Fixer-'til-broker
 
DIYtestdummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Arizona
Posts: 358
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Oh boy, FINALLY somebody who has nailed the coffin shut on my beliefs! I'm severely allergic to everything, probably my own sweat, asthmatic, blah, blah, blah. Media feeds on fear and ignorance. I haven't died yet. I have little faith in medicine and none for the guinea pig drugs advertised on TV. Most of the fungicides I have worked with are more dangerous than the mold itself. Bleach sure took care of the "black death mold" in my old apartment. The only thing bleach won't kill is algae.

"...side effects include exacerbation of the original symptoms, plus excessive body hair and if you breathe air you may turn into a firey monster."

The handyman helps keep the contractors in business.
__________________
"Aw! Why does everything that only happens to stupid people happens to me?" - Homer J. Simpson
DIYtestdummy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 07:46 PM   #12
Building and plumbing
 
USP45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: farmville, VA
Posts: 244
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


OK, the bleach thing. Its just to kill and contain the air born spores. Its the air born spores that we breath thats harmfull to us.
USP45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 06:37 AM   #13
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,843
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Well if you believe that, it's up to you. You may want to quit breathing though, because that last breath you took certainly contained a number of mold spores. Unless you have any of the medical problems I listed above, mold spores can easily be handled by your body's immune system. You may get sick if you were in an enclosed space breathing air that was thick with mold dust, but normal exposure isn't a problem FOR NORMAL PEOPLE. And even then it may well be the chemical by-products released by the molds that cause you problems rather than the mold itself. Raking leaves or spreading mulch or shoveling dirt on a dry day will get you a super high exposure to airborne spores. If you opened a very moldy loaf of bread you would likely be exposed to one of the highest concentrations of mold spores that you will ever encounter. And remember, those spores that caused that bread to get moldy were in there when you bought it. They started creating colonies as soon as that bread was baked and cooled. My thought is that if I find mold in my house, I am more concerned for what is being destroyed by the moisture, rather than the mold itself.
Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 06:40 AM   #14
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Well, I decided on treating the mold rather than replacing the framing.

I started with scrubbing with soap and water. Then, sprayed a bleach mixture on it. Let it dry overnight with a fan on it. Then, I primed with zinser BIN. Once it was dry, I sprayed on a mold inhibitor.

I can put my nose right up to it, and can't smell the mold smell anymore.

So I went ahead and put new drywall, using the paperless drywall. that's where I am now.

Next challenge: preventing this from happening again. The reason it started was because the surround wasn't properly sealed.

Any advice on ensuring it is done right? I read somewhere that it is a good idea to lightly sand the tub and surround before caulking. Any truth to this? I also know to use tub and tile caulk, not kitchen and bath as was previously used.
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 06:59 AM   #15
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,843
Default

Mold on framing of bathroom wall


Most bath caulks will stick pretty well to smooth surfaces. I don't think I would sand and rough up the surface. At some point you will need to recaulk. A rough surface will be harder to clean up. Tub and tile caulks contain some chemicals that molds don't like such as a small amount of silver nitrate or glycol. That eventually leaches out and then molds start to grow in the dirt and organics embedded in the caulk. (Paints that are marked to use in bathrooms contain chemical mold inhibitors too). Soap scum has a fair amount of mold food in it. That's what you usually see in the corners of showers, mold eating soap scum. "Mildew resistant" always makes me laugh too. Mildew is actually a class of parasitic molds that live on other molds and the leaves of living plants.
The guy who taught me about mold remediation and control just lives for the stuff. I still get an annual refresher course in it for work.
Glad you got your problem solved and didn't have to over-react

Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Raising Doorway Height (load bearing?) treefrog Building & Construction 6 02-25-2008 09:11 PM
framing, expanding wall opening wall - load bearing? nave Remodeling 5 01-23-2008 03:44 PM
Marrying a sloping stone wall to a cinder block wall. mrdol Landscaping & Lawn Care 1 11-09-2007 04:08 PM
Wall Rot: Water, Mold and Ants xquercus General DIY Discussions 6 06-19-2007 09:55 PM
Framing a 16 foot high wall for shop pranderson Building & Construction 10 01-01-2006 04:23 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.