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Old 10-16-2007, 12:41 PM   #16
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


I feel your pain. When I was getting our "new" house ready 2 years ago, I started to remove some paneling in our den to-be and as I saw the glue ripping off the drywall paper underneath, I decided to rewind and rethink. I ended up nailing it back in place, painting over everything, and using my router to improvise cheapie replacement chair rail with MDF to cover the ridge (the old chair rail was gone). With about a thousand other projects to finish around the house before the birth of our second child, I didn't need another project of that scale at that time.

For various reasons, I'll probably replace the drywall in that room when I do get around to removing the paneling. When I saw your question, I leaned that way at first, but AtlanticWBConst and others have made a good case for skimming first, if you're comfortable with it. His work looks really good, and ratherbefishin' points out that it's possible for DIY. There's only one way to find out.

If you were to replace the lower section of drywall (and just the lower section):
I can't tell from the photos how much difference in thickness there is. Is it 1/8" or less? 1/16"? Depending on the final paint color and gloss choices, a slight difference could be more or less visible if you replace just the bottom half. If there's a sizable difference and you go the route of replacing the bottom 4', could you improvise some shimming. If there's a big gap (1/4" or more), you could try really thin plywood, cut into strips for each stud, or just use 5/8" drywall instead of 1/2", or if there's just a small difference in drywall thickness, perhaps doubled or tripled (or more) thicknesses of brown work paper, like the kind used to cover floors while doing work, could be stapled to the studs beneath the new drywall to help balance the drywall thickness between old and new in the interest of reducing feathering work? Has anyone tried anything like that, or does anyone have experience making up the difference in thickness?

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Old 10-16-2007, 02:09 PM   #17
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


bmsnook, I believe he said the extra thickness he's concerned about is just mud and tape at the joint. jdelisle, you MUST remove the old tape and mud and retape the joint if you decide to hang new rock....no more problem there....
steve1234, I agree that it's easier to finish new rock, but I also have to consider the time, labor, and cost to demo and dispose of the old rock, obtain, hang, tape and finish the new. It becomes something of a trade-off, or possibly even a loss, on time and increases cost of materials considerably. Then, if a level 5 finish is expected, it has to be skimcoated anyway.... Probably not necessary in this case, though.

My best suggestion is do about a 4' test section and see if you're comfortable with it, keeping in mind you should get a "feel" for it as you go and it'll get easier. You can do it! Just be patient....
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Old 10-16-2007, 02:51 PM   #18
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


Agreed. It's a close call, and could go either way depending on the particular situation. In my case there was already a lot going on and a debris box in the driveway. The good news is both ways should get you to the desired result.

As for "shimming" drywall, you can buy precut pieces of cardboard that are 1-1/2" wide made specifically for shimming. Drywall supply houses or even the big box home improvement stores carry them. Use 1-? to make up what you need. If it gets too thick I would recommend the plywood strips. I recently had to fur out the rock on two walls to allow a bullnose into a kerfed window frame. Strips of plywood worked fine.

Good luck.
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Old 10-26-2007, 09:34 AM   #19
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


The repair is going bad. =(

The mud has blisters where the paper was partially loose. We thought we got it all but I suppose we must have missed a lot. If anyone's reading this who's facing the same mess - spend a lot of time on prep, get rid of ALL loose paper.

I'm going to try repairing the repair by cutting out the blistering spots (lots..), and if it gets either too time consuming or annoying, I will just cut the sheets down.

Thanks for all the advice guys, it's been helpful.
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Old 10-29-2007, 06:54 PM   #20
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


Have you considered rocking over the existing walls with 3/8th's rock?
This could also be glued for the most part with a fast setting adhesive like Liquid Nails`Heavy Duty, and only partially screwed around the perimeter with a few towards the center. It may alleviate extra time mudding and sanding.
However, you will have to consider the base and trim mouldings. how will you deal with those dimensional changes? 1 Option may be to first number and trace around these mouldings before removing them, then add 3/8" butting up to the traced lines. Replacing same mouldings and caulking between rock and old trim, jambs and bases.
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Old 10-30-2007, 01:52 AM   #21
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


I have done plenty of these type of projects....This is a job for a true professional that can skim the walls in a hurry......scrape...peel the glue off ect.....you will have bubbling and will have to cut it out on your next coat... tearing it out is crazy.....I could do that job first coat easy.... one man...one day....smooth finish when complete or texture if you have any above the damaged areas to match..... good luck....
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Old 03-31-2011, 09:48 AM   #22
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


A huge problem with going over existing walls that have paint, blisters, pealing paper, cracks, dents, dirt, paint runs, etc., is that each of these kinds of issues requires carefully thinking and planning to get a great result. Professionals have their fair share of boo boos but they do so many jobs over the years that it all adds up to knowledge/skill that enables them to tackle your toughest job.

One tip I learned from reading professionals posting on various forums that really works is to use Zinsser Guardz sealer over existing walls before any patching. It works.

I would recommend cutting out any loose paper and sanding the entire wall down with 80 grit sand paper. The goal is to degloss the surface and remove bits of paper, paint runs, etc., essentially smoothing the walls. If you have holes to patch, now is the time to do it. Keep in mind that you want to cut out your damaged drywall and screw in new drywall to replace the damaged. But do not apply mud at this time. You want the drywall patched areas to be coated with Zinsser Guardz before mudding and taping.

Next, wash the walls with a cleaner that does not require rinsing. I use a product from my local hardware store, though cannot remember the name of it right now. I bought a huge box about two years ago and still have a bunch left. It used to be called Soilax but was bought out by another company. Or you could use one of various recipes on the internet for creating no-rinse solutions for washing walls.

Third, after the walls are completely dry, roll on Zinsser Guardz sealer. It goes on milky and dries clear.

Now you're ready to mud and tape your patches, skim coat your walls, texture, etc. After all this is done and everything is sanded smooth. Vacuum your walls thoroughly.

Finally, apply another coat of Zinsser Guardz over the top of everything.

Now you're ready to paint. Apply two coats of high quality paint. Do not add primer over the Guardz.

Last edited by DoItMyselfToo; 03-31-2011 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 03-31-2011, 10:04 AM   #23
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


i spent years doing rental properties and new home i guess the question is
do you want a mustang or a pinto?
skim coat will fix the wall and is a cheap fix with a lot of work involved and paitence
re hang is the right solution and will retain the value of your home
if you rehand take the whole board out
you concerns with the new and old meeting up need not be a issue if you can finsh
what happens is you make a hip joint
this is a reasessed joint meets a flat joint or slightly off factory edge
you run this out like a bad butt joint doing the most work towards the field of the new board
if done properly the transistion will be fine
you might have to bust the bottum of the joint out to 36" or so
good luck
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:18 AM   #24
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


Holly ancient post batman!
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Old 04-03-2011, 11:01 AM   #25
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


Kind of fun to resurrect.
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Old 04-04-2011, 06:37 AM   #26
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Lots of damaged drywall - repair or replace?


You could become an internet terror. Randomly resurecting dead posts throughout the web.

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