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-   -   Load Bearing wall or not? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/load-bearing-wall-not-93814/)

Dennis6950 01-28-2011 10:44 PM

Load Bearing wall or not?
 
Hello everyone,
I know, I have seen a lot of posts on load bearing walls but I have not found an answer for my wall. Everything i have seen Says if there are no webs above AND no supports below it is not a bearing wall. I want to remove most of a wall that separates my living room from the kitchen and dining room. I am trying to figure out if it is load bearing or not. The house is a single story ranch, all trusses are identical from one side to the other, with one side having a 20 x 28 two car garage with no bearing supports. The living room is recessed so there is supports along this wall, but I think that they are to support the change in floor joist levels. all other floor joists in the house run through with pier supports not under any wall. In the attic, the wall does not have any webs directly above it. So is it bearing? Supports under wall, wall has double plate, but no webs within two or more feet from wall in attic. I did see on one forum that sometimes a non load bearing wall could be a bearing wall for snow load, could that be true? any help is greatly appreciated, thank you in advance.

Gary in WA 01-29-2011 11:30 PM

A picture or two above and below the wall in question is helpful...

Sometimes when removing a center wall that runs down the middle of the house compromises the shear flow of that wall. Around here, interior walls are sheathed with plywood/OSB because of possible seismic activity. When removing a section to replace with a beam, an adjoining or other section has to be sheathed to maintain the structural integrity of the house. This may or not be a factor here....
"I did see on one forum that sometimes a non load bearing wall could be a bearing wall for snow load, could that be true?" ----
Doesn't make sense to me if it was a "non-bearing" wall, it could not transmit the snow loads down to the earth without being built as such. Unless you are talking about rafters with struts and purlins, pp.7; http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...RMyCq7zQ737mAg

Gary

Dennis6950 01-30-2011 09:49 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is a drawing basic drawing of the house, all trusses are the same throughout. The living room is recessed, and that is why i think that there is support directly under the wall. The wall does have a double top beam, but I don't think there is OSB or any other sheeting under the drywall. the area that shows the recessed living room, is the only place in the house with support directly under the walls. the wall i want to remove is about 14 feet long. Thanks.

proremodel 01-31-2011 02:35 AM

I can say looking at the pictures you put up that is not a load bearing wall. With a truss system the weight is transferred to the outside walls and the gable ends. Looks like the pier underneath the floor is for the floor joists and that is normal.

Dennis6950 02-01-2011 12:55 PM

:thumbsup: Thanks for your help, I did not think it was load bearing, but I wanted to just be sure. I have had a couple people tell me it wasn't but I wanted to get other opinions. Thanks.

George6488 02-01-2011 08:34 PM

With roof trusses...all loads to outside walls. I agree with previous poster.


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