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Old 06-02-2010, 01:23 PM   #1
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Laminate over laminate


I'll be re-laminating my basement bar here pretty soon, and half the bar has laminate down, the other half is a new addition. I have the new addition top level with the top of the laminate on the old section. I didn't think to build it lower so that I can peel the old laminate off to make everything level. Do any of you have experience with laminating over old laminate, or know if it's possible and what the procedure would be? If I had to guess, just roughing up the surface with sandpaper, wiping it down, then applying the glue and new laminate.

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Old 06-03-2010, 06:11 AM   #2
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Laminate over laminate


Sounds like a plan to me. Sand the surface, clean it very well to remove dust and grease/oil, install new.

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Old 06-03-2010, 09:30 AM   #3
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Laminate over laminate


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Sounds like a plan to me. Sand the surface, clean it very well to remove dust and grease/oil, install new.
Thanks Bill!
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:07 PM   #4
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Laminate over laminate


Also, one more question. What's the best way to cut laminate sheets? I've heard using a circular saw and putting masking tape over the line I plan to cut to reduce chipping. Is there an easier, quicker way? Maybe cut it a little larger, then trim it down some how when it's on the surface? TIA!
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:26 PM   #5
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Laminate over laminate


There is a laminate cutting blade for your utility knife---It scratches a V-groove--then you just snap the piece along the v-groove. Make this cut a little big.the final trim cut is made with a router.

As to the final-Perfect cut --use a laminate trim bit in your router.

A laminate trim bit is a straight cutter with a bearing on the bottom.


Pictures should be easy to find on google.---Mike---
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:30 PM   #6
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Laminate over laminate


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There is a laminate cutting blade for your utility knife---It scratches a V-groove--then you just snap the piece along the v-groove. Make this cut a little big.the final trim cut is made with a router.

As to the final-Perfect cut --use a laminate trim bit in your router.

A laminate trim bit is a straight cutter with a bearing on the bottom.


Pictures should be easy to find on google.---Mike---
Awesome! thanks Mike.

And I'm sure I could pick all these up at any Home Depot. I need to get a router too
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Old 06-07-2010, 02:14 PM   #7
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Laminate over laminate


There is a small router made for full time counter top guys--Forget that one the little base makes it hard to control--A simple fixed base router is what you want.

Yes to the Depot. They have the knife blade and the trim bit--
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Old 06-07-2010, 02:31 PM   #8
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Laminate over laminate


Given I could probably use a router for other things around the house, since this is the only job I can think I'll be using it for, I might just rent one for a few hours, then buy the bits.
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Old 06-07-2010, 02:35 PM   #9
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Laminate over laminate


Good idea--You might have a friend with one ,too.
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Old 06-07-2010, 03:11 PM   #10
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Laminate over laminate


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Good idea--You might have a friend with one ,too.
Very true. I'll have to look into that. Thanks for the tips! Now just one last question. How do I get the inside corners cut at a sharp point? will the router bit do that, or is there another method?
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:19 AM   #11
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Laminate over laminate


You will want to use the factory edge for that. You can make good straight cuts with that laminate blade and a straight edge. The router trimmer could also be used with a very straight board.

Adding laminate to an existing top is not the usual order of things---you are going to have to wing it--
---Mike---
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:16 AM   #12
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Laminate over laminate


Ok, now I'm looking at buying a used router instead of renting one from the depot. I'm starting to think that I could make my own cupboard doors for the kitchen upstairs, which is something I've been thinking about doing for a while now. Anything I should look for when deciding on one? I'm looking on craigslist and seeing quite a few going for around $40. Does horsepower make a big difference? Is one company better than the other (Craftsman, Ryobi, B&D, etc)?
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Old 06-10-2010, 02:56 PM   #13
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Laminate over laminate


For most projects just about any router will do.---It's just a motor--a collet to hold the bits--and an adjustible base to move the bit where you want to cut.

1 1/2 horse is a good size for general use--1/4" and 1/2" collets will give you more choices of bit profiles.

I like the fixed bases myself--much easier to adjust---the plunge bases have a spring in them--every time I go to make a fine adjustment --the damn spring fights me.

Variable speed motors are used to run large diameter bits like panel raising bits. Most beginners don't use the monster sized bits--so variable speed is not needed.

As to brands----I have 5 Porter Cable routers--and one Bosch.(not bad--for a plunge base)

I never had reason to try a different brand--the Porter Cables have worked well.

Look for a used one that is easy to adjust--quickly. I'm sure they all spin the cutter just as well!

---Good luck--have fun--Mike--


Just a thought on buying bits. Carbide is the way to go.

Look at the quality and size of the bearings. The bits that are sold individually usually have good bearings.

However--some of the really cheap starter sets have small bearings that I found to be short lived.


Last edited by oh'mike; 06-10-2010 at 03:06 PM.
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