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Old 08-08-2013, 01:05 PM   #1
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Kitchen wall removal


Hi guys. I'm remodeling an older house with a galley kitchen that was added as an addition after the original build. The dimensions of the room are 14' x 7' with a wall that separates the kitchen from a set of stairs leading to the basement. I've torn out the stairs with the idea that removing this wall and adding a floor would give me much needed space for the kitchen, making it 14' x 10'. Is it okay to remove this wall without adding a beam in its place since the span of 10' seems short enough to me? Thoughts?

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Old 08-08-2013, 03:17 PM   #2
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How would we even be able to guess without at least some pictures, drawings, something.
No way would I count on any on any web site sizing the beam for you.
You really needed to have someone that knows what, such as an engineer there doing on site before even starting this. They also would be able to spec. not just guess as to what size and type beam was needed.

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Old 08-08-2013, 03:49 PM   #3
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Thanks. I'm just trying to get an idea if a beam will even be needed. I can post some pictures, but I guess I thought the dimensions would be sufficient. Let me rephrase the question: Do I need a support beam in a room that is 14' x 10' ?
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:47 PM   #4
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Still not going to do any good.
No one knows what's above this room, what style roof and rafters you have, ECT.
Just a whole lot more to it then just ripping out walls.
Almost every older home I've came across needs to have major reconstruction from some home owner removing walls on the first floor just to "open" things up.
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:51 PM   #5
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Kitchen wall removal


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Still not going to do any good.
No one knows what's above this room, what style roof and rafters you have, ECT.
Just a whole lot more to it then just ripping out walls.
Almost every older home I've came across needs to have major reconstruction from some home owner removing walls on the first floor just to "open" things up.
It's not only this but the stairs must also be relocated and engineered for the new floor opening.
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:04 PM   #6
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You mentioned that the galley kitchen was added on to the outside of the house---this means it is likely that the wall is a bearing wall--so the removal will mean adding a beam engineered for the load---

Get someone on site with structural knowledge---Mike----
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Old 08-10-2013, 12:40 AM   #7
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one-story or two-story home?

I agree with Mike, if we have to guess then the guess would be a beam would be needed based upon the span of the beam, the load it must support and the material the beam is made from.

some photos and additional information (after viewing photos) may get your better answers.

Structural remodelling is best left up to design professionals with knowledge and experience in doing such.
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:32 PM   #8
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Thanks guys, I appreciate the input. While Ive never built a home from scratch I have completed several structural projects with relative success. I've always gone above and beyond what is required to do the job. In this case, hiring a 'structural expert' would cost me exponentially more money than the $200 I've spent to successfully complete this project. 6x6 posts supporting a 14' long 4" wide lvl. Works like a dream and didnt break me.. On to the next. Thanks!

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