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Old 12-24-2009, 10:00 AM   #1
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Identify Type of Wood


Can someone tell me what kind of wood this is? It's the interior trim around my windows in a house built in 1930. Thanks...
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Old 12-24-2009, 11:13 AM   #2
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Identify Type of Wood


Looks like oak to me.

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Old 12-24-2009, 12:00 PM   #3
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Identify Type of Wood


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Looks like oak to me.
ditto

sorry but I can't get any more specific than that (red, white, pin, etc.)
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Old 12-24-2009, 12:40 PM   #4
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Identify Type of Wood


Thanks. Makes you wonder what the circumstances were that caused someone to begin painting it during the past 80 years. I know the history of the house for the past 40 and it was already painted.
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Old 12-24-2009, 12:56 PM   #5
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Identify Type of Wood


well, to me, oak is not that big of a deal. It is hard which makes it good for building many things but I do not care for the grain pattern. As such, I would not be too upset about painting it.

Sometimes people just get tired of exposed wood grain or there might have been some damage to parts of the frame and rather than repair with oak, they used some cheaper method and painted so as to hide it.
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Old 12-24-2009, 01:15 PM   #6
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Identify Type of Wood


It's too close grained for oak. More likely yellow pine with a now yellowed varnish on it.
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Old 12-24-2009, 02:13 PM   #7
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Identify Type of Wood


It is red oak. They paint it because the wanted a color to work with the room, not the common ugly yellow tone of oak. But oak is used because it is a readily available hardwood in USA and is a better quality wood than pine or softer woods.
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Old 12-24-2009, 06:41 PM   #8
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Identify Type of Wood


I happen to like oak, particularly in older homes where the baseboards are tall and thick. If you don't care for the natural color you could always stain it darker. I wouldn't paint over it however. It's nice wood.
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Old 12-25-2009, 04:51 AM   #9
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Identify Type of Wood


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Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
It is red oak. They paint it because the wanted a color to work with the room, not the common ugly yellow tone of oak. But oak is used because it is a readily available hardwood in USA and is a better quality wood than pine or softer woods.

I agree


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"It's too close grained for oak. More likely yellow pine with a now yellowed varnish on it."

This statement is just plain backwords.
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Old 12-25-2009, 07:16 AM   #10
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Identify Type of Wood


yes a tighter grain yields a harder wood.... like oak maple or cherry.
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Old 12-27-2009, 06:32 AM   #11
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Hardwood species are divided into two distinct categories--open grain (large and widely-dispersed pores) and close grain (small and compactly distributed pores). Examples of open grain wood species include walnut, oak, ash and elm, while close grain species include cherry, mahogany, maple and poplar. Grain structure has nothing to do with strength or hardness.
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Old 12-28-2009, 02:00 PM   #12
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Identify Type of Wood


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Originally Posted by Acre View Post
Can someone tell me what kind of wood this is? It's the interior trim around my windows in a house built in 1930. Thanks...



Looks like the trim in my deluxe 1928 vintage money pit old house. My trim is oak. I know because I have had most of it off at one time or another. LOL!!
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Old 12-28-2009, 08:21 PM   #13
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Identify Type of Wood


Definately oak.

One of my pet peeves as well.....painted woodwork!

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