Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-13-2012, 10:56 AM   #16
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 500
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Cut the block to the window, not size the window to block...
I disagree with this statement...will be a cleaner, easier job to stay within block coursing. If the window is smaller than the block opening provide wood blocking to make up the difference.

__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2012, 12:16 AM   #17
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


44” to sill or window opening (per location -1”) minus the rough sill = 43, minus the p.t. rough sill (framing) = 1-1/2= 2-1/2” total from the 44” = 41- ½ plus the slab/tile = 4”= 45-1/2” yet the blocks are in 8” increments or 40”, either cut 2-1/2” off the top of that row of block, or remove another one and add wood filler there as you suggest. Problem is, now instead of the window well grade coming 2” below the window (with gravel, if accepted by local AHJ), now you are 5-1/2” lower with your grade and may also need a ladder inside well because you are now over the 44” per code there (depends on grade). If draining to the yard with a drywell, now you need everything 5-1/2” deeper, hope its easy digging, not rocky or clay soil. Draining with tie-in to footing drain, fine, but now you have 5-1/2” more wood/siding applied below the window and a ladder for added expense/work, plus a bigger chance of rain water leakage below the window unless the well is covered above.

The OP could also “special order” a window to fit the blocks-removed opening, though he would still need to cut the jamb blocks. So the bottom of the window height is critical (for egress), the top can be “close enough” (break on a mortar joint if it works out), adding wood below may add; more framing/insulation; deeper depth to the window well grade-- now need ladder; deeper window well- metal or home-made; harder/longer drainage digging w.o. drain below; additional siding with greater possibility for water leaks below window. You need to cut the jambs anyway, and possibly the header (for lintel)- or sister rim joist, add framing for header, or pay more for a special order window and wait longer to install it rather than using a ready-available stock egress window.

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2012, 12:25 PM   #18
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 500
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


I see you designed the sill of the window within a half an inch via a picture that doesn't even show what coursing the block is at the floor level. Impressive...

Obviously if the situation warrants a saw-cut, then you do it. But it's much easier, for a DIYer, to break out joints and blocks than to handle a cut off saw through an 8" block foundation. Not to mention you'll likely need to replace the blocks at the sill with solid blocks to give you something to affix the sill plate to (i'm assuming the cores aren't 100% solid filled). This also goes for the tooth-in blocks at the jambs. So with that, you won't have a whole mess of wood below the window, you'll have new block, which can easily be back-filled against. Also, windows come with varying widths and heights, many that match block coursings...
__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 12:01 AM   #19
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


Thank you for the compliment but anyone with a few years of field experience in construction knows the CMU’s set on the footing and start up from there. The slab also sets on the footing edge as per Code, been that way since I started in construction in ‘73. Simply subtract the slab thickness from the 8” joints, as I said already. No rocket science here- just simple math, LOL. Most contractors only dig the minimum (unless soil conditions warrant it) and set the footing low enough for the basement headroom code plus clearance to the overhead mechanicals (HVAC) that are below the floor joists (if finished rooms).



The 4 egress windows I have cut-in didn’t work to match mortar joints on the bottom (because of the required sill set height off the slab) and I had to cut them; pour mortar mix in the exposed cells for the fasteners before covering with a p.t. sill. I suppose one could (carefully) knock the next row out, cut them to the correct size – with what, a brick masons chisel or masons hammer- very difficult to get a perfect clean/straight edge and top, replace them, and then wait for the new mortar joints to set (with an outside hole to your basement ). The only advantage to cutting them away from the area is the dust when using a masonry blade in a skillsaw (doesn’t cut deep enough) or a rented cut-off saw. I find it faster/easier (one day job) to just cut the sill blocks also as the jambs require cutting anyway, as I said earlier. Even better is to hire it out, as that big saw gets very heavy, very fast (the older you get….), I agree with you there. Window availability is important; one may wind up cutting the head (top of window) also, as window selection at box stores for DIY’ers is limited in their selection, at least around here. Have you ever cut a window hole in a block basement? Do you have much field experience with blocks, or did you go right from college to designing? I've only done a small handful and even less in the future- if I can help it...LOL.


Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 10:27 AM   #20
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,819
Rewards Points: 2,126
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


Make sure you measure everything starting form the floor up when it comes to the maximum height of the opening (from "finished" floor), although the window can be installed lower if it make the height situation easier and is code compliant because the code refers to the "maximum" height and not the exact height of the window opening above finished floor. I have seen people hold off on putting in any substantial flooring until after the final inspection because they did not plan in advance. If the window has a sticker on it or paperwork, the only thing for an inspector to do to complete his job is measure from floor to the clear opening.

GBR was quiet accurate in the description of the wall method of construction, but do not assume all basements are constructed exactly to the same dimensions. In some areas, block are made in different heights - 7-5/8" high (modular 8) that lay to 8" high (full 8) with a mortar joint that lay to 8-3/8" high. A similar situation exists with the block length. Block can be made in 15-5/8" lengths and 17-5/8" lengths that lay up to 16" and 18" including a mortar joint. Because the face dimensions and the height to length ratios are similar, it is important the check the measurement of the faces and the cemter line spacing of mortar joints. These variations occur mainly in 8" and 12" thick walls, while 10" are rarely made in the full 8" heights. For the thicker basement walls (14" and 16") they should all in modular dimensions. The use of deeper basements is more common because it is cheap space if it to be part of the finished living area.

Similarly, all slabs are not 4" thick, so measure upward starting from the slab. The slabs may be 3-1/2" or more (up to 6") depending on the needs and situation of the excavated floor level since, a slab is commonly put in after the house is framed up to speed construction (cold weather, utilities, mechanicals, etc.) and may be one of the last things done along with the sidewalks and steps.

Dick
concretemasonry is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to concretemasonry For This Useful Post:
AGWhitehouse (08-18-2012), Gary in WA (08-19-2012)
Old 08-18-2012, 12:56 PM   #21
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 500
Default

help me put an egress in this wall please


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Anyone with a few years of field experience in construction knows the CMU’s set on the footing and start up from there.
My previous response was on the basis that anyone with a few years of field experience knows that the residential sector is full of unusual construction details and assumptions as to what actually exists sometimes leads to design mistakes (I've seen it ALOT). That is however, the typical and "standard" approach...

__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retaining wall problem FMS Landscaping & Lawn Care 6 07-04-2011 07:42 PM
Avoiding load on inner, exterior wall jklingel Building & Construction 2 06-04-2011 02:35 PM
Removing a wall with no ceiling joist above it i77ac_10 Building & Construction 2 01-05-2011 01:30 PM
Atlantic-need your opinion on markd's comments about my vapor barrier? yummy mummy Building & Construction 11 03-07-2007 10:47 AM
Load Bearing Wall? Traybae Building & Construction 1 11-05-2006 02:01 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.