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gone_fishing 11-23-2008 04:09 PM

Hanging dry wall???
 
I am planning out my next project. I will be sectioning off 1/3 of my garage and redoing the dry wall. The room is 25x10. The joists run from side to side. The ceiling is 7 1/2 feet tall. I was thinking that I would run the ceiling dry wall side to side using 10x4' sheets. First, is that ok? Second, should I run the wall dry wall vertically?

AtlanticWBConst. 11-23-2008 04:16 PM

Install your ceiling sheetrock first. The sheets should be layed, so that the long side is perpendicular to your joists.
On the 25' walls, you should stagger your vertical seams, so that upper and lower (sheets) do not have seams on the same studs.
Last, lay the sheets horizontally. Full sheet up to ceiling, cut (rip) the lower sheet to approximately 3'-6". You actually, have about 1" to play with, since your baseboard will cover it. "kick" the lower ripped down sheet up to meet the upper sheet, so that the horizontal seams are tight.

AtlanticWBConst. 11-23-2008 04:33 PM

Drywall Information Web Link:

http://www.cgcinc.com/pdf/howtos/j371.pdf

gone_fishing 11-23-2008 10:56 PM

Thanks for the advice...I posted a question about laying wood flooring over a concrete slab. Do you mind taking a look?

bjbatlanta 11-24-2008 03:48 PM

You could also take the excess off of the top of the top sheet. That way you don't have to roll the sheet over to get the cut edge on the bottom. (Or try to cut 6" off the bottom of the sheet.) Otherwise, Atlantic is correct. Ceiling first. Stagger your "butt" joints on the walls and break over a window or door where possible to make the joint as small as possible.

AtlanticWBConst. 11-24-2008 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjbatlanta (Post 189614)
You could also take the excess off of the top of the top sheet. That way you don't have to roll the sheet over to get the cut edge on the bottom. (Or try to cut 6" off the bottom of the sheet.)....

Bjbatlanta, I'm sure that you, or myself, could easily rip a nice straight edge off the top of a sheet (with a utility knife and tape measure)...but to the average DIYer, ripping a perfectly "straight edge" with a utility knife, is a relatively difficult feat.

They (DIYer) are honestly better off, putting that cut at the bottom, and hiding it.

bjbatlanta 11-24-2008 05:47 PM

You've probably got a valid point there, Atlantic. I stand corrected, for those without a fair amount of drywall experience, cut edge on the bottom is probably best.

Bob Mariani 12-01-2008 04:11 AM

As tp your question of running the wall sheets vertically. It can be done this way with no loss of integrity. Many drywallers do it this way. Especially in commercial work.

If using a wood floor over concrete, use engineered lumber only, not strip hardwards, which will cup from the moisture.

AtlanticWBConst. 12-01-2008 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 192152)
As tp your question of running the wall sheets vertically. It can be done this way with no loss of integrity. Many drywallers do it this way. Especially in commercial work.

It's done vertically in commercial applications with dropped (acoustic) ceilings. When there are 8'- or less ceilings, such as residential applications, it installed horizontally 99.9% of the time. This creates fewer seams, than were you to attempt to install vertically.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 192152)
If using a wood floor over concrete, use engineered lumber only, not strip hardwards, which will cup from the moisture.

You have many options for flooring over concrete. If laminate, or engineered lumber (more dimensionally stable than hardwood) is installed, a vapor barrier should be used, with

AtlanticWBConst. 12-01-2008 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 192152)
As tp your question of running the wall sheets vertically. It can be done this way with no loss of integrity. Many drywallers do it this way. Especially in commercial work.

It's done vertically in commercial applications with dropped (acoustic) ceilings. When there are 8'- or less ceilings, such as residential applications, it installed horizontally 99.9% of the time. This creates fewer seams, than were you to attempt to install vertically.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 192152)
If using a wood floor over concrete, use engineered lumber only, not strip hardwards, which will cup from the moisture.

You have many options for flooring over concrete. If laminate, or engineered lumber (more dimensionally stable than hardwood) is installed, a vapor barrier should be used, with a floating floor type installation.

bjbatlanta 12-01-2008 03:39 PM

In residential applications, drywall is usually hung vertically only on 9' and sometimes 10' walls (and the framing has to be laid out correctly). On 8' walls, drywall is almost always hung horizontally. The exception is usually when you can't get any longer length of board into the area to be hung. On new construction I have cut a hole in the subfloor in order to hand up 12' board to a bonus room or "attic space" where there is no window big enough to "boom" the drywall through (and the finished siding is already on) to avoid having to use 8' board. Can't really do that on a finished home. Whatever will go up or down the stairs is it........


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