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-   -   Framing in doorway for bi-fold door (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/framing-doorway-bi-fold-door-129351/)

NickWa 01-09-2012 08:29 AM

Framing in doorway for bi-fold door
 
Our basement is finished, carpet and drywall. Under our stairs is an open area about 3.5'x4' with the ceiling tapering down (stairs above). Right now the doorway is wide open with drywall finished all around. I want to frame in a doorway to add a bi-fold closet door.

My question is where I will add the studs against the finished walls on either side, should I remove the drywall or just attached through the drywall on either side. I will leave drywall if it is not a big deal. I don't see why I would have to. I will be building the wall on the floor and raising into place (if it matters).

Thank you.

joecaption 01-09-2012 08:40 AM

Do you have the head room to do that?
http://www.homeadditionplus.com/fram...ifold-Door.htm
I would go with a louved door so there could be some air flow, if not it may mold up.
I also build a knee wall in the back of it since it's just wasted space and things end up getting pushed back under there.

NickWa 01-09-2012 08:48 AM

Thanks for the reply. There is a knee wall in the back (at between 3.5-4 feet tall). It has a set of doors that open to the space under the stairs which is open to the furnace room as well.

I will look into louvered doors, I have never liked the look (think it looks good and I've only ever seen the plain wood ones) but perhaps things have changed. If we used louvered doors in the knee wall (replacing the current cabinet doors) would that work? As I said it is open to the space under the stairs which is then open to the furnace room.

I will look at louvered doors but would rather go with matching bi-fold to our current basement doors.

Thanks again.

joecaption 01-09-2012 09:00 AM

Your furnace needs make up air so you may have to stay with a louved door.

NickWa 01-09-2012 09:02 AM

Hm fair enough, is the issue because it is such a small area? We have laundry room and a food room in the basement and both have regular doors. These aren't damp or smell at all (although door is not always closed).

12penny 01-09-2012 12:04 PM

A picture would certainly help here! Sounds as if the opening is already there. Not sure what needs to be framed.

NickWa 01-09-2012 12:12 PM

Here is a snap from my Sketchup of the area. You can see how it is. It is all finished drywall and there is carpet on the floor and the doors (blue/grey color) go to the space under the stairs.

The furnace room is the room on the left and is open to the area under the stairs. I want to frame in the doorway and put a closet door here. We don't have much room for coats in the entrance so there will be a coat rod and some storage shelf for boots, mitts, gloves, helmets, etc.

http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x...ramingArea.jpg

hyunelan2 01-09-2012 12:48 PM

What is the current finished opening? I think you can order them custom-sized if it's not a standard opening. Bi-folds are measured true, so a 36" door is 36" wide. It's not like a standard door where you have to have a larger rough-opening to accommodate the jamb and shimming.

EDIT:
I may have looked at that wrong, I thought the door was going to the furnace room, not to that little spot next-to the furnace room. Is that the 3.5' wide area you mentioned? 42" - 36" door leaves you with 6" for framing. Perfect for two 2x4s on each side. However, no room for the drywall wrap then. So, you'll need to cut off the drywall, frame right against the existing framing, then wrap the opening in drywall. Or, choose a smaller door and build appropriately. Just don't forget to keep the width of the drywall in mind for the opening. (i.e. if using 1/2" drywall, the framing needs to be 1" bigger than the door).


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