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Old 04-29-2012, 08:59 AM   #1
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flooring for attic


This will be at the bottom of my 'to do' list as this new house requires other things first. But I'd like to know if I can forget this or should start picking up wood.

I'm suppose to check the attic access for leaks as there are old water stains according to the Home Inspector. He said there are just rafters to walk on up there.

I'd at least like a wood walkway up there from side to side.

Will a building supply store have ? plywood in thickness strong enough to walk on? Also with humidity in Florida is this a waste of time as flooring may rot up there?

If I bought wood it'd have to be pieces I could get in my little car and carry up those 'pull down' attic stairs. It just sounds hard to have to walk on rafters, carrying a flashlight.

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Old 04-29-2012, 09:27 AM   #2
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Get a sheet of 3/4" plywood and rip it down the 12" or 18" and "screw" down,that way you don't run the risk of cracking drywall below.

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Old 04-29-2012, 03:41 PM   #3
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3/4 plywood is a little expensive, but it's what you would want. i'd go 16 or 24 inches instead of as low as 12, but just measure yourself and see what you're comfortable with.

if the plywood starts rotting, then you have serious problems with your house, much more than just replacing 3 sheets of 3/4.
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Old 04-29-2012, 04:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenlol View Post
3/4 plywood is a little expensive, but it's what you would want. i'd go 16 or 24 inches instead of as low as 12, but just measure yourself and see what you're comfortable with.
3/4" is around $22 a sheet
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Old 04-29-2012, 04:30 PM   #5
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You could always run a 2x12 up therre and screw it down. Splice the joints on a rafter or cantalever and screw in a backing to attach them
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Old 04-29-2012, 04:57 PM   #6
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Good idea to install a permanent rat-run, elevated above the minimum code required R-30 so as not to compress it. Air seal the attic first, wrap/v.b. any HVAC ducting; mastic-seal their joints first, install a housewrap on the new insulation. Best install is 1/2" shim the boards on supporting walls below, add plywood rips (12") with holes throughout for air movement to deter mold from condensation. More important in a heating climate.... skip the holes. Block the new joist ends to prevent over-turning (plywood is fine).
FL is Zone:http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...001_par001.htm

Ceiling: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico..._11_sec002.htm

Find the air leaks from below;http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021105092.pdf

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...s/Step-By-Step

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Old 04-29-2012, 05:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masterofall
You could always run a 2x12 up therre and screw it down. Splice the joints on a rafter or cantalever and screw in a backing to attach them
They are not rafters....the are ceiling joists.
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Old 04-29-2012, 07:22 PM   #8
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ravenworks;
rip it down the 12" or 18" and "screw" down. What does this mean?

masterofall;
You could always run a 2x12 up therre and screw it down. Splice the joints on a rafter or cantalever and screw in a backing to attach them. Not sure what you meant. Except I think you're saying get 2" x 12" boards and lay up there to walk on.

GBR in WA;
I couldn't do any of those things myself but thanks for the suggestions.

Joe:
Ok, ceiling joists it is.

PS
also I don't have any way to cut wood so have to rely on what I can buy 'as is'. Unless the home store cuts it for customers.


Last edited by Startingover; 04-29-2012 at 07:25 PM.
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Old 04-29-2012, 07:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Startingover
ravenworks;
rip it down the 12" or 18" and "screw" down. What does this mean?

masterofall;
You could always run a 2x12 up therre and screw it down. Splice the joints on a rafter or cantalever and screw in a backing to attach them. Not sure what you meant. Except I think you're saying get 2" x 12" boards and lay up there to walk on.

GBR in WA;
I couldn't do any of those things myself but thanks for the suggestions.

Joe:
Ok, ceiling joists it is.

PS
also I don't have any way to cut wood so have to rely on what I can buy 'as is'. Unless the home store cuts it for customers.
So....there's nothing you can do.yourself......you have no saws to cut wood.....how do you expect this to get done? You obviously have to have someone do this for you. What's up?
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:15 AM   #10
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I was going to hammer a walkway down but I can see an electric screwdriver would be better.

Yes I have a hand saw I just don't like sawing. I could hire a handyman but I prefer doing things myself. It's fun sometimes.

I'll ask at the home store if they cut plywood and then buy pieces I can take home in my car and also that way they'll be manageable to take up to the attic. Then I'll screw them in place.

Last edited by Startingover; 04-30-2012 at 12:21 AM.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:09 AM   #11
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After reading all the above posts "Startingover" I've come to a few conclusions for you to consider.

  1. I realize that doing things yourself maybe fun sometimes, but with all do respect, I would hire someone to this for you.
  2. GBR makes a critical point in that the walkway should not put pressure on the insulation, thus you'll need to have someone install vertical uprights to the side of the ceiling joists in order to raise your walkway above the insulation.
  3. I would say a minimum of 24" for the width of your 3/4" plywood. Why? The last thing you want is to somehow loose your balance on a narrow walkway and step through the ceiling. I've been up in these type attics before more than several times and only once did I come across one that had a nice wide walkway, which I certainly appreciated. Just adds a level of security to not step through....that's all.
  4. If however you do have roof trusses in place, I suspect that the spacing will most likely be 24" on center in which case you will need to double up on your plywood.
  5. I'm a firm believer that if you're going to take on a project, to at least do it right the first time and not haphazardly.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:05 AM   #12
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Crossworks,
would it really hurt that much to compress insulation when it's only the width (which ever width I end up going with) of a walkway?

For a small house, 1,430 sf there's a lot of roof pipes and vents and I will be checking those areas for leaks also. The Home Inspector said "after rain" but not sure how often I'll go up there, maybe every few months. The roof is getting old at 12 yrs old.

The house has a hip roof and is a shallow U shaped house.

I suppose I need to find a handyman. My dad never hired anyone. I just retired so have plenty of time and I'm totally amazed at my girlfriends who can't do anything nor do they want to.

I used to work in a city building permit department with 6 inspectors and always had someone to ask for advice.
thanks.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:22 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Startingover View Post
Crossworks,
would it really hurt that much to compress insulation when it's only the width (which ever width I end up going with) of a walkway?
I guess it depends on just how much insulation you're compressing. Normally with roof trusses in place the standard practice [up here anyway] is to have blown-in insulation and [I'm guessing on this] can be somewhere around 12" thick and if your bottom cord of the truss is a min of 5-1/2" then that would be an issue.

On the otherhand, if it's conventional framing, then in most cases you would have 2x6 ceiling joist and or 2x8 if the ceiling span is an extensive distance. Either way you may have two layers of rolled insulation in place. One in-between joists and another laying in the opposite direction on top of the joist.

If either of those situations exist, having anything pressing down on the insulation I would guess is not recommended and may be an issue [which i'm not very familiar with] down the road.

In this case; Better to be prudent than uninformed. [no sarcasm there either ] Just saying.

My advice in this would be to call Owens Corning direct and get their input. I'm sure they get this question frequently. Good luck.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:52 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Startingover View Post
Crossworks,
would it really hurt that much to compress insulation when it's only the width (which ever width I end up going with) of a walkway?

For a small house, 1,430 sf there's a lot of roof pipes and vents and I will be checking those areas for leaks also. The Home Inspector said "after rain" but not sure how often I'll go up there, maybe every few months. The roof is getting old at 12 yrs old.

The house has a hip roof and is a shallow U shaped house.

I suppose I need to find a handyman. My dad never hired anyone. I just retired so have plenty of time and I'm totally amazed at my girlfriends who can't do anything nor do they want to.

I used to work in a city building permit department with 6 inspectors and always had someone to ask for advice.
thanks.
you go!

you might also want to get someone up on your roof to check for and seal leaks. the right person will know exactly where to find the trouble spots on a roof and fix them for you...

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