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Old 02-22-2011, 04:48 PM   #1
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Fitting door trim


I'm in the process of triming our french doors with 1x4 stained hemlock. The doors are 9' tall and 6' wide. The sheet rock around the door is raised about 1/8" above the wood frame of the door. I want the trim to rest flat on the frame. What is the best way to trim the sheet rock down. Exacto knife. I have heard you can place the trim on the sheet rock and take a rubber mallet and gently pound which will crush the sheet rock underneath to make the trim board lie flat. Does this sound right? Thanks for any suggestions.

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Old 02-22-2011, 05:22 PM   #2
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Fitting door trim


1/8" is quite a bit for 'gently banging with a rubber mallet'.

Make a mark 2-1/2" from the door jamb on the sheetrock.
Now cut out all that sheetrock
This will allow your trim sit flat on your jamb.

If you skimp and just try to cut a little bit, the trim will rock on the edge of the drywall cut and you'll either have a gap on the jamb or on the drywall.

The closer you can get to the outer edge of the casing the better.

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Old 02-22-2011, 05:44 PM   #3
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Fitting door trim


For painted jambs I've built extensions with strips of wood, glued and nailed. Once sanded and filled they are invisible.
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Old 02-22-2011, 06:47 PM   #4
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Fitting door trim


Thanks for the suggestions. The top third of the jamb is pretty flush with the sheet. I was thinking of taking an exacto knife and trying to carefully shave of the ridge at an angle. It's probably less work in the long run to just cut out a section of the sheet rock as suggested. Sure hate cutting my nice new sheet rock.
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Old 02-22-2011, 09:26 PM   #5
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Fitting door trim


Have a similiar situation here with a bdrm door, except the it is mostly on one corner. It looks like the jack stud was bad or just placed a little off from the header, and it bows in at the bottom.

I disassembled it today because the door was showing more reveal at the top than it should when in the closed position. At least I didn't have trim on both sides yet.

I didn't notice the stud being off about 1/8" in that corner until I removed the new jam and cut it to fit, because it was pround on the interior side of the room. When I trimmed it, it was too narrow at that corner.

Now I am thinking of ripping the jam and have a split jam.

I feel some aggravation coming on.
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Old 02-23-2011, 08:55 AM   #6
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Fitting door trim


....sureform tool. Remove what you need to.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:26 AM   #7
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sureform tool?
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:29 AM   #8
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...sort of a cross between a hand plane and a cheese grater. Depots gottum.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:30 AM   #9
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Fitting door trim


I noticed when I rerocked this room, the rock had a bow in it toward the door. I thought it was the last stud before the door being out of line or bowed. Now I think it is the door framing.

Not sure why it was never noticed before.

I may have to deal with it as it is with a little adjustment. Sometimes when you change things, you have to change several things and just get in deeper and deeper.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:31 AM   #10
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Fitting door trim


Quote:
Originally Posted by boman47k View Post
sureform tool?
hand held cheese grater for drywall edges
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:33 AM   #11
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Hehhe, about the time I clicked on your response in my mail box, I figured it to be some sort or plane or grinder.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:38 AM   #12
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...and try to keep in mind, you are'nt building a piece of furniture here. I realize you want your handiwork to look the best it can, but you'll drive yourself crazy trying to get everything perfect. No one will ever notice things being a little off.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:34 PM   #13
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The sureform tool sounds like an option, I think I have something like that around. After reassessing the situation gluing strips onto the jamb is another option I might try. I have some hemlock pieces that would work well. At this point I need easy with a reasonably good look. Thanks for the suggestions.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:42 PM   #14
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...and try to keep in mind, you are'nt building a piece of furniture here. I realize you want your handiwork to look the best it can, but you'll drive yourself crazy trying to get everything perfect. No one will ever notice things being a little off.
True to some extent. Myself? I seem to have gotten into the habit of checking things out in just about every building I go into to some extent. Paint, trim, fixtures,doors, windows, even sidewalks and columns.

I tend to see flaws, especially if it is my work.

But, sometimes you have to work with what you have in old houses. Only you can determine to what degree you are willing to go to get it "good 'nuff'..

Last edited by boman47k; 02-23-2011 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:09 PM   #15
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...dont get me wrong. I'm not saying "settle for mediocrity". The point I'm trying to make is that when we enter a room our eye sees the whole picture and not a single piece of casing thats off by an 1/8". Do the best you can with your tools and talent and then let it go.

And your right that old houses are challenging. Hell, new houses are a challenge. But you go to fix that piece of trim and you have to remove the door jamb, to fix the door jamb you have to straighten the wall, in order to straighten the wall the floor system must be fixed. Ya gotta know when to say its "good nuff"

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