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Old 11-11-2007, 10:15 AM   #1
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Finished Basement Remodel Questions


we have a basement that the previous owners at some point had finished. the walls are 3/4" pine painted a very dark gray. ugh! the dropped ceiling tiles are horrible and need to be replaces. about ten high hats need to be added for better lighting. our basic goal is to just make the space lighter and brighter with new dry wall, ceiling tiles, trim. just a white, bright clean looking space. i'm going to have a carpenter/dry waller do it, plus an electrician for the lights, plug extenders etc. based on the carpenter/dry waller specs and bes materials given me, i'm buying the material, and they'll handle labor. i have an estimate of just under 5000 for the work -- not including material. i'd like to hear some comments on the price, on whether its ok to put the drywall over the existing wood walls, and any thought on what i should be wary of. TIA

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Old 11-12-2007, 09:27 PM   #2
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Hard to comment on the price w/o board feet, but I would remove some of the wood to check for mold etc. - doesn't pay to cover it up w/o checking. As far as just going over the wood, I see no real problem as long as the wood is secure and flat.

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Old 11-14-2007, 09:05 PM   #3
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Finished Basement Remodel Questions


Take this into consideration... are the wall channels of the dropped ceiling fastened to the pine, or is the pine run up to it. If these pieces of the grid are fastened to the pine, it would be a huge headache to remove pine from underneath it, and cutting it flush with it would also be a huge project and will show when finishing!

If this is the case, i would put drywall over the wood. White drywall caps can be picked up at any hardware store, They are like u channels. I_I I would put these around the top edge for a clean finished look.
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Old 11-14-2007, 09:32 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bioguy View Post
... i'd like to hear some comments on the price, on whether its ok to put the drywall over the existing wood walls, and any thought on what i should be wary of. TIA
Absolutely, it can be done. However, make sure that you use a ''Drywall contractor" to do it.
We've done it more times than can be counted. The only issue is to make sure that the wood on the walls is secured tightly to the underlying framing. That means going over it and adding nails where needed. If you have electrical outlets or switches - add spacers. If you have doors, you would have to add ''extensions'' (Finished-wood furring strips) to the frame for the added wall thickness (1/2"). There could be other things to take into consideration:
The above is to answer the simple question regarding the concept of going over wood that is attached to walls. As far as moisture issues go, or any other factors....I can't comment without seeing the actual area.

Good Luck on the project.
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Old 11-14-2007, 09:36 PM   #5
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....White drywall caps can be picked up at any hardware store, They are like u channels. I_I I would put these around the top edge for a clean finished look.

You are referring to what is called Vinyl Drywall "J" bead. It comes in variable dimensions (1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 5/8") - based on the thickness of the sheetrock it is to be attached to. It is measured, cut and slid over the required edge of the sheetrock. It is used extensively in Commercial applications to create a "finished" drywall edge when a wall or ceiling area meets a separate finished surface.
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Old 11-15-2007, 09:45 PM   #6
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If I were you, I would forget the ceiling tile and go with drywall on the ceiling, also. The cost will not be much more, if any, and it will look far more finished, IMHO.
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Old 11-15-2007, 09:56 PM   #7
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Thanks again atlantic, I'm a younger guy in my mid 20's, id say i know alot for the age, but i could sure learn a thing or 2 from you Yes, just saying the name of the item is much easier than my attempted explanation. lol

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