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Old 07-02-2007, 10:46 AM   #1
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


What sort of heat source is best for drying out in the mud/tape phase. I've talked to several people... One is a pro tape/mudder who says his first choice is electric, then propane, and kerosene as a last resort. My sub contractor for drywall wants me to use kerosene. Seems like it will burn dirty, be smelly, and be a hassle refueling. Propane puts a little more moisture in the air, but if you crack a few windows, it should be ok ?

thoughts ?

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Old 07-02-2007, 12:21 PM   #2
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


First off, The best method for drying compound on walls is simply: "Air Drying".

If you use a powerful heating source (like propane or kerosene heaters in a small area and set on high) and you dry the compound too fast, the area where it is applied with a thicker consistency (like corner bead) will crack as it dries (The excessive amount of powerful heat pulls TOO MUCH moisture out of the air and the compound). In other words, you will have deep cracks in the compound, which can be filled with compound again, but creates additional work to apply at least 2 coats over the cracks.

I do not see the need in applying a heat source unless: It's winter and there is no other installed heating system. OR . You are in a rush for the compound to dry. Which brings you back to the issue of the compound cracking.

If it is a time issue, the best solution is always going to be to simply use durabond quick dry to accomplish that (chemical reactive drying/set up).

If you are going to give it a try to speed up regular compound drying, you should stick to electric heat, as it won't create excessive amounts of heat and dry air.

Another very practical source to hasten drying is a de-humidifier or an Air conditioner. Both of these will help pull the moisture out of the air that the compound dissipates as it dries (however, these will not replace that with excessively dry air the way propane or kerosene heat can if you put them on a high setting). Something like a dehumidifier will allow the compound to dry quicker without cracking...


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-02-2007 at 12:26 PM.
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Old 07-02-2007, 03:23 PM   #3
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


atlanticWbconst, is right....we'll use electric heat in the winter, but oscillating and box fans work best. Keep the air moving!

Durabond is great for fast set up times and humid conditions, but it dries hard and can be difficult to sand! Sheetrock Durabond comes in different ways, all in a powder,add water form. You'll be looking for the Easysand 45/90 versions in white bags....Durabond isn't something I would recommend to someone with little experience (for sanding sake), but it does the trick.....
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Old 07-02-2007, 08:33 PM   #4
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


Quote:
Originally Posted by WNYcarpenter View Post
atlanticWbconst, is right....we'll use electric heat in the winter, but oscillating and box fans work best. Keep the air moving!

Durabond is great for fast set up times and humid conditions, but it dries hard and can be difficult to sand! Sheetrock Durabond comes in different ways, all in a powder,add water form. You'll be looking for the Easysand 45/90 versions in white bags....Durabond isn't something I would recommend to someone with little experience (for sanding sake), but it does the trick.....
Right...I meant "Easy-sand"...

After being in the business for 20 + years, you have the habit of referring to products by their "original" names. Back in time, the only quick-dry product out was "Durabond". There was no such thing as ''easy-sand''.

In the industry (at least in my area)... we still call easy sand "durabond"...from the old days (referring to ''quick-dry mix'').
(We, and others in the industry around here, refer to the original durabond as: "Brown Bag" durabond) .........

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-03-2007 at 05:59 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-03-2007, 12:02 AM   #5
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


I've tried it several ways over the past 20 years and I can tell you the few hours you save using heat will only add a few hours patching the cracks caused by the heat. Air-Drying is the way to go and move the air around as much as you can! We use big (carpet-dryer) fans to move it around.
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Old 07-03-2007, 12:52 PM   #6
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Drywalling question (heatsource)


`We use fans, 20" box fans... cheapos, to keep air circulating.
If winter and humid, small electric heaters to get rid of some of the moisture.
Propane bombs seems to generate moisture.
r

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