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-   -   Door slab with 'floating' panels?! (pics) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/door-slab-floating-panels-pics-11542/)

joeyboy 09-14-2007 02:25 PM

Door slab with 'floating' panels?! (pics)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Okay, I'm starting to prep for installation of this door (front door to the house).

Once I got it out and opened, I realized that those 6 panels you see in the picture are NOT set in place, they kind of 'float'. You can manually move them a few millimeters to any side.

I have to imagine I'll need to finish this differently, due to the fact that if they float, and I paint it, if one is moved I'll get cracks in my paint and moisture/swelling in my door.

So, do I use some kind of glue/caulk to get them in place? Or will primer/paint be enough to keep them in place?

joeyboy 09-14-2007 02:44 PM

(oh, and any tips on things that will make this install different than a hollow-core, cheapy bedroom slab, would be greatly appreciated. I just installed one of those and learned about chiselling for my hinges/latch plate, drilling for latch/knobs, packing hinges for adjustment, and cutting for size)

Big Bob 09-14-2007 03:01 PM

Joey do not, DO NOT glue the panels. They are designed to float a bit so as to minimize warp. It is better to repaint in a few years if paint does some minor cracking then having to replace the door slab.

What type threshold do you have?

Ron6519 09-14-2007 03:53 PM

As stated before the panels are supposed to float. If you make sure you paint all six sides of the door with primer and top coat it should minimize movement of the panels.
Ron

joeyboy 09-14-2007 04:41 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Bob (Post 62989)
Joey do not, DO NOT glue the panels. They are designed to float a bit so as to minimize warp. It is better to repaint in a few years if paint does some minor cracking then having to replace the door slab.

What type threshold do you have?

Coolness, my painting approach is 1 coat primer (grey on the outside for the red paint 2 coat finish), and 1 coat on the inside/sides of door of white primer for a 2 coat tan finish.

I attached pics of the threshold as I don't know what type it would be called.



Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 63002)
As stated before the panels are supposed to float. If you make sure you paint all six sides of the door with primer and top coat it should minimize movement of the panels.
Ron

Awesome! I was just concerned it'd be letting moisture in. So if I prime/paint properly it should essentially seal it for me then?

Ron6519 09-14-2007 05:35 PM

You would also need to redo the entire perimeter of weatherstripping. What's there now is ineffective. You can get a better door sill the sits higher then the carpet. Get one with an adjustable middle that you can set to the right height with the door bottom. Replace the stop molding with a molding that has a compression weatherstripping on it so when the door closes, the seal is slightly touching the door. If you close the door and see light, it's not sealed to the weather.
Remember to paint the top and bottom of the door or it will swell and open at the seams.
Ron

joeyboy 09-14-2007 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 63015)
You would also need to redo the entire perimeter of weatherstripping. What's there now is ineffective. You can get a better door sill the sits higher then the carpet. Get one with an adjustable middle that you can set to the right height with the door bottom. Replace the stop molding with a molding that has a compression weatherstripping on it so when the door closes, the seal is slightly touching the door. If you close the door and see light, it's not sealed to the weather.
Remember to paint the top and bottom of the door or it will swell and open at the seams.
Ron

Awesome tips, thanks! That's mostly what I was planning, except replacing the threshold itself. But will do that! Was going to replace that weather strip stuff in the frame (never seen that type before...) with the kind we'd use up in MA that's what you described. But yeah, the way it is currently, with that POS door, you can see light around the entire perimeter!

joeyboy 09-24-2007 05:53 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 63015)
You would also need to redo the entire perimeter of weatherstripping. What's there now is ineffective. You can get a better door sill the sits higher then the carpet. Get one with an adjustable middle that you can set to the right height with the door bottom. Replace the stop molding with a molding that has a compression weatherstripping on it so when the door closes, the seal is slightly touching the door. If you close the door and see light, it's not sealed to the weather.
Remember to paint the top and bottom of the door or it will swell and open at the seams.
Ron

took me until today to realize you meant I need to replace the weather stripping, and only suggested I replace the threshold lol! Door will likely be hung tomorrow, but it's been painted (white matte on thin sides and inside, satin dark red (SW superpaint) on the outside), and hardware's installed (except hinges and threshold bumper piece, which I'll likely just pull off the old door).

What do you think, okay job for an amateur? This was from raw slab, did all my boring / chiseling and everything :thumbup:

joeyboy 09-24-2007 05:54 PM

(ah! my pics don't show the killer peep hole! It was my favorite piece of hardware aesthetically!)

scorrpio 09-25-2007 04:07 PM

As seasons change, wood 'moves'. Meaning those panels will swell up in summer and shrink in winter. For this reason, all solid wood frame and panel assemblies leave a bit of space for movement. Though usually, there is some way to prevent the panel from moving freely. Like gluing 1" in the center of top and bottom. Or placing small compressible rubber balls into grooves before inserting panels. Because of the movement, panels are usually finished before assembly.

In your case, these panels are not too wide, so movement should be minimal. Sealing wood with primer and paint will also cut movement down. Whatever is left, paint should have a bit of flexibility to survive a few seasons without cracking.

But personally, if I know that the door will be painted, I prefer Masonite. Panels in these dors are integral, milled right in the slab, and are not subject to movement.


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