Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-12-2010, 02:32 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Posts: 777
Share |
Default

Door sag correction


I've got a solid wood core entrance door on a metal frame. As you can see in the picture, it has settled and sagged on the right side(latch side) and now catches the carpet. I own the condo but I'm limited as to what I can modify that is shared with the building. I've asked building maintenance to look at it and they want to chop the bottom and warned me that they'd leave a nasty gap. I've hung exterior and interior doors before so I'm familiar with them but I'm looking for some tricks of the trade, maybe shimming one side to get it straightened out?
n0c7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 02:52 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 886
Default

Door sag correction


This can probably tune up... with out cutting..

Besure the screws are tight on the top hinge both sides hinge to door and hinge to jamb/ metal frame.

Pack the hinge:
Losen bottom hinge at Frame... take some heavy thick paper box type paper and slide in under hinge. You may need to double up the paper..

reset screws and test..

add more paper if needed... you can add some to door slab side of hinge also. (you might need to losen middle hinge and pack lightly)
Big Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 03:25 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Andover, CT
Posts: 4
Default

Door sag correction


Sometimes you can adjust a door by replacing one of the hinge screws that go into the jam with a longer screw that will reach the stud behind the jam. as you tighten the screw it will pull the jam leveling the door. I have not tried this trick with steel jams but it works with wood jams.
topshop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 04:00 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 96
Default

Door sag correction


If this door used to be square, and is now sagging, then topshop has it right.
Get a few 3 inch screws and drive that top hinge into the framing really hard.
Do the same to the other side of the top hinge (into the door) but this time use a 2 inch screw and pre-drill it.
Dairylander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 05:18 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 886
Default

Door sag correction


I've been wrong before. I'm on marriage # 2.

steel frames should stay plumb and square if installed properly unless you have Major settling issues or physical damage.

Unless your steel frame is really whimpy I don't beleive you will pull the top over with a longer screw. A good sized lag bolt...you might be able to crimp the metal or shift the whole frame ... be careful of drywall damage.
Big Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 05:28 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: central virginia mountains
Posts: 1,857
Default

Door sag correction


some metal frames have screws for tightening/setting/adjustment of the frame in the jamb itself, usually in the door area. If the frame has moved that much I would check the floor for settling. They make hinge shims in metal and stiff cardboard slotted specificaly for shimming of steel frames, your lumberyard may be able to help or there may /should be a metal tag on frame/door with fire rating and fabricator. that may give you a lead
__________________
The older I get the better I was
tpolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2010, 07:26 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 96
Default

Door sag correction


Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Bob View Post
steel frames should stay plumb and square if installed properly unless you have Major settling issues or physical damage.
Unless your steel frame is really whimpy I don't believe you will pull the top over with a longer screw.
I agree, it's probably not the frame that's racking.
I'm betting this heavy door is pulling the top hinge off the jamb or pulling the other half of the top hinge off the door.
The goal of the longer screw is to hang the whole door on the studs, not just on the jamb with those puny 1/2 inch factory screws.
Dairylander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2010, 07:56 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Andover, CT
Posts: 4
Default

Door sag correction


Like I said I have not tried this with steel jams. If it does adjust the jam some paint touch-ups may be needed.
topshop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2010, 08:51 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: central virginia mountains
Posts: 1,857
Default

Door sag correction


steel frames wrack if not installed properly. are these wood or masonry or steel walls?
__________________
The older I get the better I was
tpolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2010, 09:16 AM   #10
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Door sag correction


Everyone gave you good ideas that can be combined to help your problem.

Since it is a solid core door, it is heavier than some. It COULD be that the top screws have pulled loose some.
-1. Try tightening the screws.
-2. Remove the screws, and drive a couple of wooden matchsticks (heads removed) into the holes. Reinstall the screws.
-3. Try larger (length and diameter) screws.

If none of those fixes work, open the door all the way and place a level on the hinge side of the jamb just to see if perhaps the jamb has moved out of plumb. If it has, you can either do the proper fix, or Mickey Mouse it a little.

The proper fix would be to remove the casing and shim the hinge side jamb level again. Then reinstall the casing. A fair amount of work, and I honestly might not elect to do it.

The Disney way is to remove the screws from both the middle hinge and the bottom hinge. Do this on the jamb first. Then as some have suggested, insert some cereal box cardboard under where the hinges sit. Roughly twice as many layers under the bottom hinge as under the middle hinge. Try 2 on the bottom and 1 on the middle. If that does not cock the lower part of the door out enough, do the same thing again on the door side of the hinges.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2010, 09:24 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: central virginia mountains
Posts: 1,857
Default

Door sag correction


there is no trim willie its a metal frame. should only be screws from hinge to frame, if he starts jamming wood in hinge holes or running long screws thru frame holes he could irreparably damage frame and fire rating. and if thats a fire rated door they cannot cut the door without serious paper work
__________________
The older I get the better I was
tpolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2010, 11:45 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Posts: 777
Default

Door sag correction


Hi all,

Thanks for your advice thus far. After a closer look, it appears that the frame and door are solid and that it may be the floor that is not straight and is installed very close to the bottom of the door. I've shimmed the bottom hinge(really difficult as these are the self closing type hinges that'll snap your finger off) and it's a bit better but I've yet to try the middle hinge. I'll give the middle hinge a shot next and keep you guys posted. After my first adjustment the door now just brushes my floor mats instead of drags against them,.
n0c7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2010, 07:08 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 886
Default

Door sag correction


nOc7,

Glad this is starting to work out for you. Sorry about the pinched fingers..been there done that..

This is a tuning process... and can take a number of attempts to get the right balance.... keep going... you will get to a point that is acceptable to you...and that is what counts.
Big Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Replacing upstairs subfloor mgrommet Flooring 5 11-09-2008 09:29 PM
Temperature correction question koomo510 Electrical 5 10-17-2008 01:34 PM
2p breakers, ratings, and amp capacity reverend_maynard Electrical 6 09-27-2008 12:41 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.