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-   -   Best Way to Frame Around Ductwork (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/best-way-frame-around-ductwork-156343/)

VikingDinKC 09-09-2012 09:15 PM

Best Way to Frame Around Ductwork
 
Hello

I am curious what is the best way to fame around ductwork in a basement? Initially, I thought I would just frame around the ductwork using 2x4’s and then put sheetrock around it. As I have done research, I came across this article. It outlines using 2x2 and ˝ inch plywood and then sheetrock.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...g/Step-By-Step

For me, what is most important is structural integrity and then reducing sound. Which approach would you recommend?

Thanks.

oodssoo 09-09-2012 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VikingDinKC (Post 1006607)
Hello

I am curious what is the best way to fame around ductwork in a basement? Initially, I thought I would just frame around the ductwork using 2x4’s and then put sheetrock around it. As I have done research, I came across this article. It outlines using 2x2 and ˝ inch plywood and then sheetrock.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...g/Step-By-Step

For me, what is most important is structural integrity and then reducing sound. Which approach would you recommend?

Thanks.

2x4's are the easiest way to go. It's totally matter of preference with regards to the plywood then drywall vs just drywall. On the topic of insulation of sound and heat loss, you could just about build the frame to the design you prefer.

My 2 cents.

Missouri Bound 09-09-2012 09:31 PM

2 X 4' are the way to go. Be careful not to push on the ductwork. It's not a bad time to insulate with rigid foam. Make sure you allow access for any dampers which may need adjustment. Post a few pics.

mae-ling 09-09-2012 09:37 PM

If it is less then 2' wide then just use2x2 or 2x4 "wall" on each side, or one side and 2x2 nailer on the other. Then ceiling drywall spans across them.
Depends on how much headroom you can afford to lose.

Gary in WA 09-09-2012 11:10 PM

Just be sure to add 2x fire-blocks in any abutting walls at the drop ceiling line, 1 out of 4 things they left out in the pics/text/article.

Gary

VikingDinKC 09-10-2012 10:28 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Gary

Thank you for the tip… I would not have included a fire block. Just to make sure I understand, I want to make sure a board is covering any gap between the wall, ceiling and framed duck area. In the link below, do the first 2 images detail what I am supposed to do?

http://www.icreatables.com/framing/fire-blocking.html

Attached is a picture of the main ductwork cutting my basement in half. I have 9 foot ceilings so I want to make sure I am framing this properly since I have space. I am not sure if you can see in the image, but I have ductwork on both sides of the metal beam which is basically in the center of the basement running the long way.

How would you recommend I frame around this? Attached is an image on how I am thinking about doing it. Does this look like the proper method? In the image I do not see any insulation around the ductwork. Should I be including any? Also, how much space should I leave between the ductwork and frame (1 inch?). It also looks like 16 inch on cener.

One last question, you said this was 1 of 4 things left out… what are the other 3? I am a big Mike Holmes fan so I want to do I right!!!

Thanks

Missouri Bound 09-11-2012 06:29 PM

I think the picture is exactly how I would do it. Whenever you stay with conventional building methods everything seems to fit better.:yes:

VikingDinKC 09-12-2012 09:31 AM

Here is another example I found but it uses 2x2’s instead of 2x4 so probably costs less to build.

http://www.ifinishedmybasement.com/f...ound-ductwork/

Gary in WA 09-12-2012 10:57 PM

The last link has 1-1/2" length between each "cross-beams" where fire can travel to the walls. Check this from another moderator; second pic in post 12, post 22; http://www.diychatroom.com/f98/how-f...framing-37190/

2. Need canned foam/caulking under foam panel (imperative to air seal), glue pattern behind it is also very important; http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-database/743

2-1/2. Add foamboard to top edge of concrete wall (all surfaces of the concrete "sponge"; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ce-insulation/

3. Add a sill sealer under all bottom plates for an air/thermal/capillary break, whether a poly plastic is under the slab or not; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

3-1/2. ADA the drywall to stop air from getting to the cavity insulation/concrete wall though pin-holes you may have missed to condense basement moisture on the wood framing if the foamboard isn't thick enough or holes in foam seal, or around electrical boxes; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/

4. Use nailers along running joists every 2', not 3' on center per drywall manufacturer if the next joist is farther than 7" from wall. Never nail through a chord of an engineered joist, always toe-nail blocking to the chord, risk splitting the 1-1/2" ones. I posted that in this forum some time ago, no search tonight. I was nice; double-up on some and counted funny, they must feel bad enough...

Gary
P.S. Don't forget your basement egress windows per code to keep everyone safe.

MKW 09-13-2012 01:40 PM

Hi this question is similar to my question. I'm not trying to be rude: but could the people helping this thread help me?

Here: http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/how-f...5/#post1009050

I have low air-ducts in my basement, and I want to finish my basement.

Missouri Bound 09-13-2012 07:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MKW (Post 1009150)
Hi this question is similar to my question. I'm not trying to be rude: but could the people helping this thread help me?

Here: http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/how-f...5/#post1009050

I have low air-ducts in my basement, and I want to finish my basement.

It's not rude, just a waste of time to post your issue on an existing thread. Start your own thread and get answers directed solely at YOUR issue, not someone elses.:offtopic:

VikingDinKC 09-13-2012 10:30 PM

Excellent article on fire blocking, this is definitely an area where my knowledge can improve.

Here is what I have done.

I have wrapped all concrete surfaces with ridged foam except for the furnace room. My understanding was this was a higher fire risk and if it caught on fire, the smell is horrendous.

I have put this foam under all sill plates so I do not have any concrete toughing pressure treated wood (except for my stairs which were built by my builder… honestly, I think they did a good job).

Also, I have been using the airtight drywall approach. I have 1 inch ridged foam on all concrete walls. I used insulation tape to seal all seams where the foam boards met. I also took spray foam and sealed all bottom sill plates after the foam was put in place. I also foamed around all pipes. I then plan on adding fiberglass insulation before I put on sheetrock. Using this discussion form and lots of internet searches is where I learned all this information. Here is a thread I had on this site where I learned a ton (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/foam-...-walls-130310/). People are very helpful.

Can I ask you one other question… do you have any structural integrity concerns with using the 2x2 approach instead of the 2x4 approach for the links I listed in the previous search. The 2x2 approach saves a little money but if it is not structurally sound, then it is not the right way. Just curious on your thoughts… you are very knowledgeable in this area.

2x2 approach:
http://www.ifinishedmybasement.com/f...ound-ductwork/

Thanks


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