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jmorc2003 01-04-2013 03:48 PM

Beadboard wainscotting walls in bathroom
 
Thinking of adding beadboard to the walls in a small bathroom. The walls are currently tiled, bottom half of the wall in most of the room, and the entire wall and ceiling in the shower. I would rip off the tiles and attach the boards to the sheetrock.

Looking for ideas for what to do with the walls inside the shower. Should I put the boards up the shower/tub and then keep the tile? Can the beadboard sheets be used in the shower area? Is there something else to use on the walls and ceiling of the shower? Also should mention that the beadboard would be white, while the tile is an off-white or tan in color.

Also worth mentioning, I don't have an exhaust fan in the bathroom so moisture is sometimes an issue.

joecaption 01-04-2013 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmorc2003 (Post 1086284)
Thinking of adding beadboard to the walls in a small bathroom. The walls are currently tiled, bottom half of the wall in most of the room, and the entire wall and ceiling in the shower. I would rip off the tiles and attach the boards to the sheetrock.

Looking for ideas for what to do with the walls inside the shower. Should I put the boards up the shower/tub and then keep the tile? Can the beadboard sheets be used in the shower area? Is there something else to use on the walls and ceiling of the shower? Also should mention that the beadboard would be white, while the tile is an off-white or tan in color.

Also worth mentioning, I don't have an exhaust fan in the bathroom so moisture is sometimes an issue.

Post some pictures!
Bead board has no place in a wet area!
In the wet areas it can be tiled or at least tiled up to about 5' and sheetrocked the rest of the way with green board or paper less sheetrock.
I can not stress enough how important it is to have an exohost vent that runs all the way to the outside of the house!!!

TrailerParadise 01-04-2013 04:20 PM

If you are going to put that prefinished beadboard anywhere in your home, do yourself a favor and get an oscillating multi-tool with the Dremel universal adapter and the Dremel wood-cutting blade. NOT the circular blade, the long skinny blade that has Dremel Wood printed across it. We used this board in the kitchen, and this tool is a lifesaver. Jigsaws and circular saws destroy the white finish, utility knives wont cut it, and reciprocating saws tear it up. And Joe is right, it has no business in a wet area. Its made of masonite board, it will disintegrate. What you could do is get some real wood beadboard (more expensive, but much more durable) and paint it with moisture-blocking paint and primer, and put that in your bathroom, but not the prefinished paneling stuff. But inside your shower, i would still use tile with a waterproof backerboard and waterproof membrane. If you have ever watched Holmes on Homes or Disaster DIY you will know that grout is not waterproof! You must have a backer!

jmorc2003 01-04-2013 05:49 PM

So are you saying that beadboard in general is not ok in a bathroom? Or just not the shower area?

woodworkbykirk 01-04-2013 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrailerParadise (Post 1086328)
If you are going to put that prefinished beadboard anywhere in your home, do yourself a favor and get an oscillating multi-tool with the Dremel universal adapter and the Dremel wood-cutting blade. NOT the circular blade, the long skinny blade that has Dremel Wood printed across it. We used this board in the kitchen, and this tool is a lifesaver. Jigsaws and circular saws destroy the white finish, utility knives wont cut it, and reciprocating saws tear it up. And Joe is right, it has no business in a wet area. Its made of masonite board, it will disintegrate. What you could do is get some real wood beadboard (more expensive, but much more durable) and paint it with moisture-blocking paint and primer, and put that in your bathroom, but not the prefinished paneling stuff. But inside your shower, i would still use tile with a waterproof backerboard and waterproof membrane. If you have ever watched Holmes on Homes or Disaster DIY you will know that grout is not waterproof! You must have a backer!


you can use a jigsaw or circ saw no problem, you either cut from the backside of the panel or use masking tape and tape the base of the saw first. pros do it this way every day without issue

joecaption 01-04-2013 11:52 PM

It's fine of you use a real wood or those high dollar vinyl pieces.
That prefinished MDF paneling is junk and will not hold up.

TrailerParadise 01-05-2013 02:02 AM

Kirk, the real wood stuff will cut with those tools no problem, but the prefinished masonite board will not, it will destroy the finish. Trust me, i just did a whole room in this stuff and used every one of those tools i mentioned. i destroyed three boards.

chrisn 01-05-2013 03:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmorc2003 (Post 1086384)
So are you saying that beadboard in general is not ok in a bathroom? Or just not the shower area?


Never put wood in a shower:no:

woodworkbykirk 01-05-2013 07:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrailerParadise (Post 1086622)
Kirk, the real wood stuff will cut with those tools no problem, but the prefinished masonite board will not, it will destroy the finish. Trust me, i just did a whole room in this stuff and used every one of those tools i mentioned. i destroyed three boards.


ive installed thousands of feet of it and ive never had issues, sounds like your using the wrong jigsaw blade or your using a circ saw blade thats dull or not high enough a tooth count.. for finish work you have to use a 40 tooth circ saw blade.. a craftsman doesnt blame the tool he knows how to adapt and change things so they always get the results they want

also 3 boards isnt a big deal, if you allow for waste and 5% error in your estimate it wouldnt have been an issue.

joecaption 01-05-2013 10:04 AM

A few tips for installing it.
All seams need to be sitting on a stud.
Install about 1/2 up off the floor. For two reasons, it can not wick up water on the floor and floors are never level. Just snap a line and set them to the line.
Before installing look around to see where it's going to come up in relationship to any outlets, the top of the sink, any windows.
The standard heigth would be 32" so you can get three pieces out of one 8' sheet.
Start in the middle of the wall to the cuts on the ends will be about equal.
Scrib in the end cuts, sometimes I use a sander to fine tune the inside corners so there tight enough you do not need that ugly inside corner moulding.
Use Loc Tite Qwick grip so you need less fastners. I use a hand floor roller to run across the face of the sheets to level out the glue. A rolling pin will work.
Done right you should only need nails at the seams and a very few top and bottom. The panel cap and base boards will hold it tight to the wall.

Duckweather 01-05-2013 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk (Post 1086667)
ive installed thousands of feet of it and ive never had issues, sounds like your using the wrong jigsaw blade or your using a circ saw blade thats dull or not high enough a tooth count.. for finish work you have to use a 40 tooth circ saw blade.. a craftsman doesnt blame the tool he knows how to adapt and change things so they always get the results they want

also 3 boards isnt a big deal, if you allow for waste and 5% error in your estimate it wouldnt have been an issue.

Ever try the saber saw blades that have teeth that cut downward? Harder to hold down but can cut from the finish side.

joecaption 01-05-2013 10:26 AM

Works fine but the saws sole can leave marks unless you use some blue tape.

woodworkbykirk 01-05-2013 11:33 AM

i hate those blades i just use coping blades by bosch

TrailerParadise 01-05-2013 10:24 PM

Sounds like a lot of headache when you can easily use an oscillating multi tool and get it over with. No tape required, no special blades, the blade is $4. OP, if you want to save yourself a lot of time, a lot of energy, and a lot of money, use an oscillating tool. Those sheets are expensive.

joecaption 01-05-2013 10:27 PM

I agree, my ossilating saw and my drill driver are my go to tools for a ton of jobs.


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