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rodsteryz 10-21-2007 09:34 PM

Bathroom tile
 
I am going to put tile down in a friends bathroom, I have done quite a few tiling jobs but never a bathroom. Couple questions, will the tile affect putting the toilet back in? (Ring being deeper in floor) What is the best way to go from the new tile to the existing carpet in the hallway?
Are there any other hidden problems that will arise?
It is a pretty new house so I don't think water damage or neglect will be a problem.
Thanx

timthetoolman 10-22-2007 01:01 AM

The ring (flange) being lower in the floor is usually not that big of an issue, unless you are building the floor up with durorock or similar material. I find that this is almost never a problem for me.

Wax Rings which toilets are set in vary in thickness and are numbered from 1 to 10. 1 being the thinest, and 10 being the thickest. Generally getting a thicker wax ring is all one would need to do.

I would say by my guestimation if finished tile sits up more than 1/2'" above top of flange, you may want to get a slip in flange (available at any hardware store), which is pretty easily installed if current flange is pvc.

Keep in mind height of carpet, that you dont want finished tile to sit much higher if at all. If reasonably flush any carpet bar should do - from carpet to bare floor or tile.

Hopefully this helps...I have done a handful of bathroom floors, but i dont specialize in flooring and im sure that there are more experience flooring guys on this site, so feel free to jump in and correct me:)

Boomersooner 10-22-2007 10:22 AM

One mistake I made on my first bathroom tile floor was that I did not ensure the tile was exactly level around the toilet. I generally take care in ensuring level tiles but I got one that was just a little high. This did not allow the toilet to sit flush on the tile and it wobbled back and forth.

NateHanson 10-22-2007 12:57 PM

I set the toilet in sanded grout to improve the look, cleanliness and stability of the toilet on the floor tile. Otherwise you have all kinds of little gaps that gather grime. I packed the gap with grout, same color as the floor grout, and used a finger to make a smooth cove finish. Then didn't touch the toilet for 24 hours so the grout could set. Look Ma! No wobble! :D

rodsteryz 10-26-2007 12:18 AM

Thanx for the ideas. It is a great idea, and I can see positives of grouting around the base but would it become an issue if the toilet needed to be replaced or if a leak was to come about? Seems like it would be better to just be extra careful to get the tiles that are directly under the lavey to be level.

tyler101 10-29-2007 05:06 PM

Make sure that you do not use mastic in a bathroom application. Also depending on the type of tile you use, make sure your subfloor has the correct rating to support the weight. The deflecto rating for ceramic should be at least 360 or 720 for natural stone tile.

tyler101 11-05-2007 09:44 PM

Here is some more information on toilet installs. http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/...ad.php?t=40603

Mike Finley 11-13-2007 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rodsteryz (Post 69937)
Thanx for the ideas. It is a great idea, and I can see positives of grouting around the base but would it become an issue if the toilet needed to be replaced or if a leak was to come about? Seems like it would be better to just be extra careful to get the tiles that are directly under the lavey to be level.

While the idea is logical, you might just want to adjust the material for a better long term result. Any good grout manufacturer has color matched tubes of caulk available that match their grout colors. Caulking the base of the toilet is the prefered method. Grout really isn't made to work correctly in a connection like that and over the years will eventually fail, very quickly especially if you are talking a sanded grout.

But the idea is a good one, it really gives a nice finished look when you caulk it the same color as the grout on the floor. It's a trick we have been using for years.

One other thing, don't try to level the toilet using grout, the idea is a cosmetic one only. Grout is not structural and will not stay there. Get some toilet shims and shim the toilet first, then caulk it. They make toilet shims specifically for this purpose, we just use the plastic recycled ones as they are cheap and we always have them around anyways.

pesphoto 11-13-2007 11:33 AM

I recently tiled my bathroom floor and yes the flange sat lower in the floor afterwards. I just used and extra think wax ring and longer bolts. Worked perfectly. I caulked around the base of the toilet, but not the back of it in case something does leak so I can see the water leaking and know there is a problem. Been a few months and so far so good.

timthetoolman 11-13-2007 11:57 AM

I guess this is just an opinion-i do not like caulking around toilets, never in any situation. I had worked for a chain of about 400 apartments which had all been getting new bathroom floors. Yeah thats alot. Out of a total prob 200 toilets-all which were caulked, about 8 of the subfloors had signs of water damage around flange. And of course most of them being on 1st floor, was never really recognized!!! Damn im gonna make a pattern to cut new 3/4in plywood! What im getting at is, it has absolutely no benifits other than appearance. The downfalls of caulking around toilets in my estimation out weigh the benefits. Use nylon shims, preferably in back of toilet and have a nice day!

pesphoto 11-13-2007 11:59 AM

Good point, yes. I do not caulk all the way around, just the front and leave the back open to detect any problems that might occur with leaking.


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