DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Remodeling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/)
-   -   Bathroom Renovation (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/bathroom-renovation-5840/)

TonyD 01-10-2007 10:26 AM

Bathroom Renovation
 
I am presently renovating my old 1940 bathroom. I removed everything down to the studs. I would like to tile the wall surrounding the tub but not the ceiling. what do I use for the walls ?.....Can I use regular sheetrock for the rest of the bathroom walls and ceiling. I also ripped out the floor to the studs. What thickness plywood is sufficient.

Thanks

TonyD

KUIPORNG 01-10-2007 10:42 AM

I think all walls, ceilings should be used greenboards. it is not that much more expensive than regular drywall, but they are harder and more regid, for bathroom which area generally small, I think you should go for greenboard.

in addition, for shower/bath unit wall surround and floor, you should use somthing like cement board or equivalent due to heavy contact with water...

Darylh 01-10-2007 10:59 AM

I would go 5/8" t&g select Mim. 3/4" best for the floors glued and screwed every 3" edges, 6" every where else and then depending what your putting for finished floors 5/16" probard for lino or 1/2" cement board for tiles ( apply thin bed motar to the subfloor plywood as you install the cement board) .. Green board for walls except where the tub is, here I would use cement board and apply a waterproof membrane so you have a absolute waterproof backing.

Bonus 01-10-2007 12:18 PM

Daryl, can you still buy greenboard? you can't get it around here anymore. They are not recommending it in wet areas anymore. I've been using denseshield in bathrooms (not under tile), it's paperless drywall.

TonyD, what are you putting on the floor (finish)? If you're tiling it you need some cement product under the tile, but you also will likely need another layer of ply. Make sure your joists and their span are up to the task for tile or you could wind up with a real mess.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-10-2007 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus (Post 29575)
Daryl, can you still buy greenboard? you can't get it around here anymore. They are not recommending it in wet areas anymore. I've been using denseshield in bathrooms (not under tile), it's paperless drywall.

TonyD, what are you putting on the floor (finish)? If you're tiling it you need some cement product under the tile, but you also will likely need another layer of ply. Make sure your joists and their span are up to the task for tile or you could wind up with a real mess.


In my area: Our local Drywall supplier only carries XP board from National Gypsum. Instead of just the MR rating it has the MR and the Mold resistant rating....tho, I wouldn't use it in areas that get direct moisture....It is mostly popular for basement installs, not showers (obviously)....

Darylh 01-10-2007 09:38 PM

[quote=Bonus;29575]Daryl, can you still buy greenboard? you can't get it around here anymore. They are not recommending it in wet areas anymore. I've been using denseshield in bathrooms (not under tile), it's paperless drywall.

I will have to check on that its been about a year since I had to worry about it., thanks for the info. I still beleive to this day that is not so much the wall board but the paint. A top line Drywall Sealer and at least 2 coats of enamel should fix you up and that the Green board was just a little extra protection and that a top quality cement board be used under tile. None of my bathroom renos has failed but I will be on the phone tomorrow to check into this.

TonyD 01-10-2007 11:28 PM

Ok thanks for all the replys...I can greenboard here no problem, so I will use that for the walls. I saw this other stuff not cement board at the local supplier, not sure of what it's made of but they say it's lighter to work with for the tub surround. As for the floor, I removed approx 3" thickness of cement with small 1"x1" tiles on it. The base is made of 3/4'' planking which is pretty beat up which I will replace). So to meet the hall way floor height I only need about 1 1/2" of sub floor then tile. The original floor in the bathroom was way to high to begin with. Oh the other thing I noticed was where the original tub was located it sat on only on 3/4" planking. The rest of the floor which was 3/4" planking which was recessed into the joists by 3/4" ..kinda of strange, but I guesss they had a reason for what they did back then. I am going to put in a tub with some spa jets , this particular model has a removal front valance to get at the pump if need be. should I make the the tub sit a little higher on the floor so when I add the floor tile it comes up even so I can remove the panel. I hope I am making sense.
Thanks

TonyD


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:41 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved