DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Remodeling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/)
-   -   Bathroom Options (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/bathroom-options-21581/)

jerome8283 05-28-2008 10:19 PM

Bathroom Options
 
2 Attachment(s)
I'm tiling my bathroom and have a small area that separates the toilet area from the rest of the bathroom. There's a small wall near the shower that often gets a little wet due to the closeness to the shower. You can see the damage near the bottom. I attached pictures..

What could I do with this? Tile? Greenboard? Can I tile over drywall?

angus242 05-28-2008 11:18 PM

I'm a little confused to what you are actually tiling. Are you tiling the floor only or are you planning on doing the walls too?
Water + wood or paper = mold.
Remember, you see some damage. What is going on behind the wall?
One word for everyone that reads this and is asking about tile in a wet area:
WATERPROOF

Now, if you're asking if you can just tile over that wall in it's current state? NO
Can you use greenboad, tile over and call it a day? NO
greenboard does nothing to help the situation and as far as I'm concerned, it's an obsolete option.
Can you use a cement backer, tile over and the problem will go away? NO

In order to give you some advice on the situation, I would need to know your plans on what you're doing with tile. I'm not sure if you're also planning on tiling the surround too, tiling to the current surround or just adding tile as a baseboard.



EDIT:
I just noticed that looks like a fiberglass surround. That would change a few things but can you describe the area in more detail?
Thanks

jerome8283 05-29-2008 08:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus242 (Post 126490)
I'm a little confused to what you are actually tiling. Are you tiling the floor only or are you planning on doing the walls too?
Water + wood or paper = mold.
Remember, you see some damage. What is going on behind the wall?
One word for everyone that reads this and is asking about tile in a wet area:
WATERPROOF

Now, if you're asking if you can just tile over that wall in it's current state? NO
Can you use greenboad, tile over and call it a day? NO
greenboard does nothing to help the situation and as far as I'm concerned, it's an obsolete option.
Can you use a cement backer, tile over and the problem will go away? NO

In order to give you some advice on the situation, I would need to know your plans on what you're doing with tile. I'm not sure if you're also planning on tiling the surround too, tiling to the current surround or just adding tile as a baseboard.

EDIT:
I just noticed that looks like a fiberglass surround. That would change a few things but can you describe the area in more detail?
Thanks

I'm tiling the floor only. My question is related to what to do with the wall depicted in the the pic which is close to the shower and often gets wet.

Termite 05-29-2008 09:25 AM

You need to strip the sheetrock off that wall and install cement backerboard and tile. I'd suggest a waterproofer over the cement board as well for good measure (redguard is one option).

jerome8283 05-29-2008 10:42 PM

Should I go halfway up the wall? I'm also a little concerned about where the wall meets the shower enclosure and how tile would look.

angus242 05-29-2008 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerome8283 (Post 126531)
I'm tiling the floor only. My question is related to what to do with the wall depicted in the the pic which is close to the shower and often gets wet.

OK but in your original post I wasn't sure if you were asking about repairing the wall or tiling the wall.
If you repair the current damage with more gypsum board, the problem will only reoccur. You need to either stop the water from getting out of the shower or waterproof the area.
If you chose to tile the wall to help, remember that tile and grout are NOT impermeable to water. You need to address the material the tile is attached to in order to waterproof. If you have extra floor tile, you could add some on that part of the wall just next to the fiberglass surround. First you need to remove the old wallboard. Take out anything that is obviously damaged and then as high as you would tile. Replace it with a similar thickness cement board, like Hardi. Then you need to waterproof. RedGard is your cheapest option. It gets painted on and allowed to dry. Now you can tile directly over the RedGard. When you grout remember to NOT use grout where you have a plane change in the tile...like a corner or the floor-to-wall transition. That joint needs to be caulked with silicone. Make sure that you silicone between the tub and tile too. These joints are considered flexible and if grouted, it can fail when there's movement.

Good luck

angus242 05-29-2008 11:24 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by jerome8283 (Post 126727)
Should I go halfway up the wall? I'm also a little concerned about where the wall meets the shower enclosure and how tile would look.

You must have been replying when I was. I didn't see this until after I posted.
I understand it may not be aesthetically pleasing, but it will be better than mold. Here's a way to tile:

jerome8283 05-30-2008 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus242 (Post 126733)
You must have been replying when I was. I didn't see this until after I posted.
I understand it may not be aesthetically pleasing, but it will be better than mold. Here's a way to tile:

Thanks so much for your help!

jogr 05-30-2008 12:28 PM

Seems like the best approach would be to prevent the water from leaving the tub area and getting to that location. Many bathrooms have drywall adjacent to the tub/shower with no issues because the water stays in the tub/shower enclosure. What is causing the water to get there?

jerome8283 05-30-2008 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jogr (Post 126812)
Seems like the best approach would be to prevent the water from leaving the tub area and getting to that location. Many bathrooms have drywall adjacent to the tub/shower with no issues because the water stays in the tub/shower enclosure. What is causing the water to get there?

I would say it's due to the wife and kids not keeping the curtain closed. Of course I always close the curtain.

angus242 05-30-2008 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerome8283 (Post 126828)
I would say it's due to the wife and kids not keeping the curtain closed. Of course I always close the curtain.

You'd still need to repair the wall but here's a cheaper option to stop the water:
http://www.showerbuddy.com/Showroom/...cessories.html

jeannieB 06-16-2008 11:22 AM

Question for Angus
 
Hello ! I read the whole post and have a question for you. I want to remove old tiles from the wall in my bathroom and replace them with new tiles. I am assuming that the board underneath is concrete (it is the original wall and tile from 1957). Is this OK? Should I put the water sealer you mentioned on it first? I am a DIYer with a very small budget and the bathroom is the worst room in the house (the whole house needs work) The previous owners tiled the shower in white tiles but left the remaining pink and black tiles in place for the rest of the room (it was a half bath that they expanded by putting in a walk in shower). I don't think I could do the wallboard over so I hope you tell me it's do-able. I have my fingers crossed.:thumbup:
Thanks in advance,
Jeannie

angus242 06-17-2008 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeannieB (Post 130777)
Hello ! I read the whole post and have a question for you. I want to remove old tiles from the wall in my bathroom and replace them with new tiles. I am assuming that the board underneath is concrete (it is the original wall and tile from 1957). Is this OK? Should I put the water sealer you mentioned on it first? I am a DIYer with a very small budget and the bathroom is the worst room in the house (the whole house needs work) The previous owners tiled the shower in white tiles but left the remaining pink and black tiles in place for the rest of the room (it was a half bath that they expanded by putting in a walk in shower). I don't think I could do the wallboard over so I hope you tell me it's do-able. I have my fingers crossed.:thumbup:
Thanks in advance,
Jeannie

Sorry. No way you're going to be able to get the tiles off without damaging the walls. Although I don't understand the big concern about wall board. You can buy DensShield or DensGuard (maybe $15 a sheet?) and then a gallon of RedGard to cover the seams and screw holes and you're ready to tile. It's approximately $200 (or less) of material to get you a 100% waterproofed new shower. If you don't have $200-ish wiggle room in your budget, maybe you should save up some before hand. Otherwise, it's a fairly simple process. Just read the instructions on each material and follow the instructions exactly. You'll be good to go!

jeannieB 06-18-2008 09:29 AM

I wan't as concerned with the cost of the DIY project, but more with my lack of experience. I have NO experience whatsoever with this stuff. It is really more a fear of making a bad situation worse. Maybe I'll give it a try - you make it sound do-able! :clover:Thanks Angus,
Jeannie

jerome8283 08-17-2008 05:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus242 (Post 126733)
You must have been replying when I was. I didn't see this until after I posted.
I understand it may not be aesthetically pleasing, but it will be better than mold. Here's a way to tile:

Angus,

Where you suggest caulk (in you pic above), is it necessary to leave an 1/8" gap or are you just suggesting caulk to prevent water from entering these areas?


Thanks


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 PM.