Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-11-2012, 09:23 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 35
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Basement Wall Framing


So my 1971 basement has this wonderful wood paneled walls that I'm planning on swapping out for drywall. Also, part of my basement does not have any framing on the walls, just the block foundation. I wanted to outline what I've researched to see if it was bogus or good info.

My plan, 2x4 or 2x6 walls with batt insulation (most likely 2x4).

In summary,

Start in a corner, measure 4 to 4 1/2 in away from the block at both corners of one outer wall. Chalk the points to form a line. Apparently, leaving 1/2 to 1 in gap will do two things; (1) allow good airflow and (2) prevent wall interference with the studs.

Two methods to construct a stud wall: On the floor, or cut the studs to length and stick-frame it piece by piece.

Fasten the bottom plate to the floor with anchors. Use pressure treated wood for the bottom plate. Use tar paper between the block wall and the stud wall. If pre-framing the wall on the floor, you can staple the tar paper on the studs ahead of time. Complete electrical work, insulate with batts, vapor barrier, and drywall.

Questions:
(1) Regardless of whether you pre-construct the wall on the floor, or cut pieces to length, do you start by aligning and fastening the bottom plate to the floor? In other words, if you pre-build the wall, you end up with two bottom plates (second being part of the framed wall)?

(2) When starting in the corner, how far do you space the bottom plate from the block wall? Snug or as mentioned above, spaced 1/2 to 1 inch?

(3) Is it recommended for a DIY'r to pre-construct the wall or cut and nail piece by piece?

(4) How does the tar paper stay in place? Nail it to the back side of the wall? Or glue it to the block?

Thanks,
TW

trophywalleye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2012, 10:28 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,055
Rewards Points: 1,030
Default

Basement Wall Framing


The information you have is old and not considered right.
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...lation-systems Check out his link.

Also do a search of this forum for basement insulation.

Styrofaom against the wall, then possibly a 2x4 wall inside with insulation and no vapor barrier.
Yes you can build your walls and stand them. Make them a little short say 3/8" so you can tilt the wall. and fill in the top. Treated wood on the bottom plate with Galvanized nails.

Only one bottom plate is needed for exterior walls. For interior walls make your wall 2" short then nail (or screw) a 2x4 treated to the floor the wall goes on top of this and tight to the ceiling. A 2x4 is 1.5" so it gives you a 1/2" gap Put shims in and nail beside them not through them. The gap provides for settling, or heaving of the floor. Screw the drywall to the top of the two bottom plates and nail the trim to the bottom of the to plates this provides a slip joint and allows the wall to move if things shift.

mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 09:32 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 504
Rewards Points: 508
Default

Basement Wall Framing


In the automotive forums when somebody posts "This is how you do X", it gets 'stickied' at the top of the posts and is there for everyone to see and not have to ask and answer the same question a million times. That should be done here.

While there will always be variables to everyone's situation, let that be the question they ask.

B
Beepster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 09:34 AM   #4
Hardcore DIY'er
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 67
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Basement Wall Framing


I always have done the following when building my basement walls. Attach rigid foam to the wall then build frame in placed. I nail my pressure treated lumber to the floor (ramset) then I use my laser level to find where my top plate should be. Nail that up, then put in studs. As far as the wood dimensions go, your basement is already configured for load bearing, all you need are 2x4 at most for the walls.
EvilNCarnate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 11:09 AM   #5
Dangerous
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Basement Wall Framing


So what I get from the Building Science .pdf document is that for a basement remodel, I should use some thickness of semi-permeable XPS rigid insulation for the full height of the basement walls, then frame over and put un-faced batts between the studs...?

What of the ceiling? I read conflicting opinions on whether I should have batts in the overhead or not...

Thanks
Cerberus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 11:12 AM   #6
Dangerous
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Basement Wall Framing


Also, I'd sure like to know where the cost estimate of $0.65/ sq. ft for a 2" thickness came from. That stuff is more than $1.25/sq. ft for a 1" thickness. Unless I'm pricing some super special stuff and not knowing it
Cerberus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 11:25 AM   #7
MarginallyQualified
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winston-Salem NC
Posts: 3,698
Rewards Points: 2,070
Default

Basement Wall Framing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerberus View Post
Also, I'd sure like to know where the cost estimate of $0.65/ sq. ft for a 2" thickness came from. That stuff is more than $1.25/sq. ft for a 1" thickness. Unless I'm pricing some super special stuff and not knowing it
$.65 x32 = $20.80 per sheet
shop it prices will vary a lot.
TarheelTerp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 06:35 PM   #8
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Basement Wall Framing


A poly sill sealer under the p.t. or cedar bottom plate for a thermal/capillary/air break. Fire-stop the gap above the foam/frame wall to the floor cavities above and every 10’ lineally along the wall as per code. http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par031.htm

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 10:20 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,055
Rewards Points: 1,030
Default

Basement Wall Framing


You got the wall idea right.
For the ceiling usually done more for sound reasons then heating. And better methods than just insulating.
Unless you insulate every room and give them each their own heat control.
mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2012, 01:15 PM   #10
retired union carpenter
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 323
Rewards Points: 250
Send a message via Yahoo to coupe
Default

Basement Wall Framing


hi TL, to answer your questions.

Questions:
"1): Regardless of whether you pre-construct the wall on the floor, or cut pieces to length, do you start by aligning and fastening the bottom plate to the floor? In other words, if you pre-build the wall, you end up with two bottom plates (second being part of the framed wall)?

(2) When starting in the corner, how far do you space the bottom plate from the block wall? Snug or as mentioned above, spaced 1/2 to 1 inch?

(3) Is it recommended for a DIr to pre-construct the wall or cut and nail piece by piece?

(4) How does the tar paper stay in place? Nail it to the back side of the wall? Or glue it to the block"

I always get my rooms laid out first, marking the longest wall first. I mark 4 1/4-4 1/2 away from wall to allow for plumbness of block? after getting the longest wall marked, I always square it for other walls by pulling a 3-4-5 or any multiple thereof= 6-8-10? 9-12-15? these are in feet. measurements. I use longest I can, make a mark at 3 feet from the corner of next wall on chalked line. I like red chalk, it's permanent. perpendicular to that line, mark exactly 4 feet in an arc fashion=), measure from the 3 foot mark to the 4 foot mark again ( where it measures exactly 5 feet when marks meet is square it takes two people, one to hold tape one to mark. once I have these two lines chalked, I like to use my framing square and put a good heavy pencil mark on lines both ways and spray paint them heavy enough to seal them but leave pencil marks showing. you can measure for all other walls from these two lines. I also transfer these two lines to the center of basement, pencil and seal them at leas 6 inches inside of outside walls, they come in handy later, if you install some floor covering with a pattern? that needs to be square in rooms, once the paint dries, as the project progresses when you sweet floor, or it gets flooded? these painted marks will always be there.

when you have all your walls marked on the floor, transfer those lines onto ceiling joists using a plumb bob and chalk those. wherever walls run parallel with joists? you'll need to add blocking, 2x4's every 2 feet to fasten top plate of walls.

I like to build my walls on the floor like Mae said 3/8 short or so then shim at top and screw to joists/blocking beside shims not through them. you can staple tar paper on while on floor. the pressure treated bottom plate, I staple 2 layers of tar paper onto bottom of bottom plate, I also pre drill 1/2" holes in bottom plate before standing it up. once it's up in position, on line. I use a concrete bit and drill 1/2" holes in floor to except 1/2"x3" expansion bolts to fasten to the floor.

personally, I don't like things sealed too tightly, such as block walls or built walls. if sweats? needs air to dry

__________________
as always, just my thoughts
good luck....coupe/Larry
take what helps? ignore the rest.
coupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Basement Concrete Wall Framing Against Stairs Epicsoccer Remodeling 7 01-13-2013 04:11 PM
How tight is too tight for a new basement wall? vseven Building & Construction 16 01-07-2010 09:50 PM
Wall - LOAD BEARING: How to Move? user49172 Building & Construction 1 03-11-2009 05:48 PM
Will water lines freeze if placed behind insulated stud wall in basement? jpsmith Remodeling 22 03-05-2009 01:23 PM
Framing new wall in basement civil_corruption Carpentry 2 02-12-2007 08:23 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.