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Old 01-06-2009, 12:43 AM   #1
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Basement wall


I am putting a bathroom in the basement, I have about an 8' run that is going to go directly against the concrete wall. I have seen a number of different ways to do this as far as finishing goes. What is the right way? I tend to overkill (don't think it is a bad thing) I would rather over kill now than deal with rotting stuff later. I have no moister problems. Talked to the guy at Lowes, he said just use R-13, no treated 2X4's, nothing. Should I paint the wall with blocker, use 3\4 inch ............you get the idea. How do I not create a problem down the road? Wanna do it right and not deal with it 5 years from now.

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Old 01-06-2009, 01:30 AM   #2
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Any wood in direct contact with concrete needs to be treated material. That should only be your bottom plate, and the studs should be spaced an inch or so away from the wall. Using treated lumber for anything besides what you have to is a mistake...Use untreated lumber for everything that doesn't touch concrete. You can certainly take the precaution of painting the basement wall with a product like drylok, but nothing will keep water from infiltrating if it wants to.

As for vapor barrier, I'd suggest kraft faced fiberglass insulation and nothing more. The kraft paper is a vapor barrier, and goes on the warm side of the wall. Adding plastic or anything like that in the wall isn't really a great idea because it can create a moisture sandwich in the wall.

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Old 01-06-2009, 01:31 AM   #3
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If you must jam the studs tight to the wall, I'd suggest backing each one with a strip of building felt a few inches wide. Treated lumber will get all wonky on you after it dries out, long after you're done with the bathroom.
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:17 PM   #4
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I've been doing a lot of research on insulating my unfinished basement as part of making our home more energy efficient. My Energy Auditor suggested the installation of 2" rigid foam (R10) directly adhered to the poured cement walls. Then I'd have to frame 2x4 walls, electrical & plumbing, then drywall to finish any areas as need be.

The rigid board is supposed to work as a thermal bridge, reduce condensation, and is considered as a vapor barrier.

Owens Corning has some 1 1/2" panels that are attached via furring strips that would help you maximize the size of your bathroom.

There's another company called Ovrx that has a paneling wall system (OSB covered styrofoam with R12) as well as a method to cover/insulate the floor (R3.2).

You can also find a video on youtube where Holmes on Homes insulates a basement wall and floor with rigid foam.

Best of luck.
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:18 PM   #5
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Another method of "rot prevention" would be the use of galvanized steel studs??
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:19 PM   #6
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Steel studs????

A proven thermal short circuit that can lead to condensation on the finished wall that can atract air-borne dust and create stripes.

Galvanized or not, you can get rust wherever there is a screw that destroys the galvanizing as it chews in a connection.
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:52 PM   #7
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Thanx for all the help, I am making this harder than I need to but I just want to make sure I do it right the first time. I also found this link if it would help anyone else.
Thanx again, ready to start some framing!

Another quick question, it was stated before to use treated 2x4's on the base of the walls because it is setting on the floor. I have to build up the floor (2x6's) for a upflush and also raise the floor for the shower. (going to tile the shower) Should I use treated lumber for this also since it will be setting on the floor?
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:15 PM   #8
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Hey rod, did one with upflush toilet last year. That unit went behind the wall in a small space inside the closet. Then you only need to elevate the floor for the shower. Doesnt make the room look small. Just a thought.

Last edited by 12penny; 01-07-2009 at 03:18 PM.
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Old 01-09-2009, 02:07 AM   #9
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If you have the typical 8' basment concrete wall you really don't want to raise the floor for plumbing. You will always wish you didn't lose that headroom. It's awkward, it looks amaturish and reduces the perceived value of the bath. If you have 9' walls then you probably can get by with raising the entire floor of the bathroom and still have enough headroom but who really wants to step up into a bathroom or down out of one?

I doubt it costs any more to put a sewage ejector basin and pump and shower/stool/lav rough-in in the floor than an upflush toilet and raised flooring costs. DIY cost is probably $400 for an entire bath dwv rough-in with ejector basin and pump. Then you don't lose any headroom and can use a conventional toilet.

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