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Old 02-02-2007, 11:13 AM   #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BWB View Post
It is NOT required by code that they be pressure treated - It's required that they be protected from dampness or decay by either using PT, or poly / felt
etc.
Ummm…yes it is required by code:

MA 780 CMR: 2311.4.6 Posts or columns:
Posts or columns supporting permanent structures and supported by concrete or masonry slab or footing which is in direct contact with the earth shall be approved naturally durable or preservation-treated wood.

You listed the ‘exceptions’ that fall UNDER ... the PRIMARY CODE. The point is, that it's clearly listed as the primary CODE requirement (with some exceptions - which you listed).

So your statement that it is ‘not required by code’ is incorrect. Again: It IS the primary Code - with some exceptions listed as a ..... sub paragraph.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BWB View Post
Why have wood that you need gloves and a mask to handle in your house when there are safer alternatives? i.e. a dri-cor subfloor or plate which allows for air flow, and doesn't leave wood in contact with cement?
Cement board is hazardous when cutting, Sanding sheetrock, sheetrock dust can be hazardous when cutting, When handling cement, thin-set, mastic, other adhesives- gloves should be worn. If you find termites or carpenter ants infesting your property, there is only one course of action: Pesticide spray...I could go on and on…
You keep bringing up Dri-Core flooring, which is a very good product. But, it is FLOORING, not framing. What does that have to do with the structural framing members attached to the concrete floor or freezewalls?
I know that Dri-core states that you can attach framing to their floor. But it is described as a 'floating' floor that needs to have room to exband and contract. I would not install framing to such a floor. I would use it in between walls.

Incidentally: Try installing something other than Pressure treated lumber as a bottom plate on top of the freezewalls of an addition or home in our area and see if it will pass any kind of inspection. Whether there is a moisture retardent layer there or not, it will not pass.


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-02-2007 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 02-02-2007, 11:50 AM   #167
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Basement wall plates are not 'posts or columns'. Building codes are interpretive, and mandate the minimum permissable practices. Read past the first sentence and find the best option, not the first one on the list. Suggest a better alternative than methods used when the codes were written.

The other products you mentioned don't leach chemicals or off-gas. Granted, PT plates won't kill anyone in the long haul, but there are better products available.

On the other hand, this is a pointless discussion, you obviously already know EVERYTHING! Cheers.
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Old 02-07-2007, 10:17 AM   #168
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After trying techniques from the famous drywall book (the most popular one if you do a search in Amazon)... and the web site for DIYers which I gave earlier... it ends up the book still better, the web site technique takes forever to do ... it may be ok if you only need to do one drywall... but not good for major project.... anyhow.... I find out the quality of the mud is extremely important... if you somehow got a bad batch.... either bad product, or bad mixing or too long ago...whatever reason... do not use them... buy different ones in the local store to try them first see which is the best.. the one I found the best are the blue paper box ones from CGC... as you are going to buy 20 buckets... finding which one is the best first rather than buy all 20 not good ones at once is a good idea... and the 4x14 towel and 6" knife.... is two fantastic tools to use together... it can almost do everything, well almost...
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Old 02-07-2007, 11:13 AM   #169
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Which book did you buy for drywall?

I think soon I will need to start to do some reading.

What is your 4X14 "towel".
Is this a tool?
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Old 02-07-2007, 11:17 AM   #170
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the book I used is

Drywall: Hanging and Taping (Paperback)
by Myron R. Ferguson (Author)

I saw it selling in HD as well... This books give a lot of info... I use most of them... but doesn't mean I follow it 100% either... you need to find your own personal favour from it...

the towel thing I am talking about is those with a handle underneath, it is a very common hand tool, it comes with different size, I just find 4"x14" is the most convenient size...
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Old 02-14-2007, 09:29 AM   #171
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I just did a few thrid coating, here is some observation:

- yes, only very thin layer of mud would be on the surface, it is so thin that it dry out a bit after you swipe them through...

- yes, like AtlanticWBConst said, the mud should be quite dilute with water, but not too much, dilute mud when put on thin layer, have a very smooth surface.

- the book above is really work, I felt its techniques really the best way to use...

- I find out the mudding concentration throughout the 1st,2nd,3rd coating can make your job work/easier/more difficult...etc... so use right concentration is important, on the otherhand, it is not difficult to achieve certain concentration... just add more water/mud and remix when necessary... a machine mixer is a must have, couldn't imagine using hand mixing to go through 20 or more buckets mixing...
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Old 02-22-2007, 10:46 AM   #172
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First, my mom passed away peacefully last Saturday. Although we missed her, we are glad that she does not need to suffer anymore. We believe she is going to a better place.

Back to my basement,

I got the aliked Porter Cable Drywall Sander, I don't know if it is such a good idea to invest this for sanding once event, as I did the sanding for the laundry room using pole sander, which is pretty quick, except for the dust... it is not that difficult... anyway I got it so I will use it for the rest of the area... I also find it very useful on one thing, last night I used it to sand clean the plywooded floor in the bathroom before tiling... this is quick and fast... comparing to all those hand scrapting and sweeping... you can do this in 1/20'th amount of time... so if you have a large wood flooring need to be cleaned up before tiling... this is a good tool to use as well...

Sanding, I found out sanding can really make big corrections on the surface... so make sure you don't skip this step or spend little effort on this step...

I am going to go away from finishing the third mud for a little while as I want to complete the laundry/bath room in order to move the washer/dryer to the basement first... as the Boss want that... once I finish that, I will post picture for that.

for tiling, I changed my mind of using Ditra, as I figure there wouldn't be really wet on the floor, I am going to lay the marbles directly on the plywood after pouring some self leveling mud... using Ditra I am afraid will raise the floor too much...
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Old 02-22-2007, 11:22 AM   #173
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I am sorry to hear that your mother passed away.
I hope your memories will help you during this difficult time.

I am looking forward to seeing your basement pics.

Is there anything on the market that would reduce the dust when sanding?

Someone should invent something that attaches to the sander that is sort of like a vacuum cleaner that will suck up the dust as you are sanding. I would buy that, because I really hate the mess that it will create.
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Old 02-22-2007, 11:26 AM   #174
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What is a pole sander?

I imagine it is a block with sandpaper on it, with a long pole?

(I know it's a stupid question.)
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Old 02-22-2007, 11:28 AM   #175
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Thanks for your nice message. Yummy Mummy

Yes, there is somthing in the market to reduce dust, for what I research there are two types:

one is like pole sander but you can attach it to the vacuum at one end, this seems work well base on people's experience, except it really takes much longer to sand... it is good if you have small area to sand or you only sand a little bit a time for a long period of time

the other one is what I bought.. which is fast and vacuum dust: Porter Cable Drywall Sander.. this guy is really expensive though... I spent over $300 on it... I hope I can recover some of the cost once I finished with this guy... I don't really recommend this tool due to its high cost...


Pole sander is like you describ... it is the most common type of sanding tool... most go rectangular in shape, now there are round shape... the problem of round shape is you need to order special sanding paper from the net rather than going to HD to get it...

the vacuum is those shop vacumm to be used... regular home used vacuum in theory can be used but you don't want to abuse such delicated equipment with construction type job...

Last edited by KUIPORNG; 02-22-2007 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 02-22-2007, 03:11 PM   #176
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Thanks for the information about the vacuum sander.

Do you have to attach your vacuum to it or do you have to buy a special vacuum for it?

I hope your expensive tool makes your job easier.

I plan to do my sanding and taping, a little at a time, due to my time constraints.

Thanks for the information.
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Old 02-22-2007, 03:28 PM   #177
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The dust from a pole sander is not too bad usually. It cleans up easily.

You may also want to consider a little "wet sanding". You would just use a ever so slightly damp sponge instead of a sander. It will get things very smooth and no risk of fuzzing up the drywall paper. They make a sponge for this purpose, it has a rough side (green) and a smooth side (yellow), its about 4"x8"x1.5".

Wet sanding doesn't really remove much of the mud, it only moves it around a little. If you have way too much mud on your joints a sander may be required first.

Let me know if you want more details on the wet sanding.

(BTW - I am doing trim now, drywall done, walls painted, doors in, fireplace in. I have not yet scheduled the carpet as I'm unsure when I'll finish the trim. I need to go on a business trip for a week. Looks like, if all goes well, I will be ready for carpet in 2 weeks. Carpet is my very last thing. YEA)
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:00 PM   #178
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Would love to see some pics of your place brik!
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:50 PM   #179
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don't know how to attach a more high resolution pictures as it said max file size is 97 kbytes
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:52 PM   #180
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almost done tapping recreation room...
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