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Old 01-08-2007, 03:06 PM   #151
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Basement Renovation Question


I have setup the shower enclsed unit... didn't follow the instruction though, the instruction said to assembly the two walls and the base first before fitting it... I found this is too hard to do... rather I fit in the base first before drywalling... then install the walls... then some screws cannot applied as the instuctions... but I thinks those screws are not so important...

anyhow... started drywall taping... one extremely important thing: make sure your screws slightly under the surface... I have quite some not exactly under but at the same level or slightly higher... due to not too careful when using the screwgun, not 100% prependicular... now this thing eat me up at taping stage... I found those screws which is under the surface takes no effort to tape, but those not, take 5 times more effort...the book even suggest fix them before tapping... me on the other hand don't want to go back thousands of screws to check this... it just too much time effort, I hope the second coat will be easier as the first coat should have make them more flush...

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Old 01-09-2007, 09:17 AM   #152
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Actually, I find out screwing those not perfect sitting screws using hand held screw driver is worthwhile and fast... so do it before tapping...

and a rotery tool for cleaning equipment is very good, you will get satisfaction when you see the hardest spot in the mixer change into dust by the rotery tool...

setting compound is good, I want strong bonding to this outside corner, but the problem is you only get a small size batch, to make the cleaning effort justified, go for those longer time setting compound as suggested by AtlanticWBConst and others ...
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Old 01-11-2007, 09:45 AM   #153
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If you are going to mix your own compound. Make sure you try some already mixed one first to get a feel of how the compound should be when finished mixing. I made the mistake of not doing this and only discovered my thought to be correct concentration is in fact not correct... hopefully, it is only the first coat which can be covered up...

Setting compound have the advantageous of strong bonding which I personally think it is important for many outside corner which will suffer heavy traffic and bombarment... but you cannot beat ready mixed drying type compound for this reasons: you don't need to spend time/effort to clean the hard to clean equipments on every batch... you can take your time do the mudding until it is perfect looking without worrying the mud is going to dry soon... you don't need to worry about wrong concentration by mixing yourself... if you got the mud concentration correct, you are 50% done with mudding if not more...

So for non-experience DIYers, here is what I recommend, first coat on outside corner and screwheads, setting compond... anything else, use ready mixed all purpose compound...

well this is what I think for now...
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Old 01-12-2007, 06:44 PM   #154
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Keep up the good work and thank you so much for logging all your progress in this thread... I'm entering the framing stage on Monday morning! Wish me luck!

- Jim
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Old 01-12-2007, 09:15 PM   #155
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Good luck with your framing project.
I am also in the process of framing my basement.
I am enjoying it, whenever I get a chance.

Kui****g, is a real help since he is documenting everything and we are learning from his experiences.

Way to to Kui****g.
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Old 01-15-2007, 08:58 AM   #156
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Thanks for the encouragement: Yummy Mummy and jadams68...

After so doing quite some outside corner mudding, here is what I can share:

- again, first coat = setting compound

- make sure there is no screw/nail not flush with surface, this will make your mudding job 5 times easier, you will get less water wave effect

- if you are using setting compound, that stuff is really bond, that means you can get away with less fasteners, although I am sure some people out there must disagree with me on this, but I found out the setting compound is so hard it stick some of my corner which is quite loose at some part to become hard and strong...

- when put on first coat, use horizontal and veritcal application, one small length at a time, and don't worry about those not pretty surface, they will be cover up by second coat, just make sure there are no very high point you created ...

- when put on second coat, put mud on the whole length using 5" knife, then use a 10" straight head knife to sweep from top to bottom or bottom to top, at the longest length you can do...

there is a quite link which teach DIYers do mudding, I borrow some idea from it but not all:

http://www.drywallinfo.com/outsidecorners.html

don't know if Nathan will allow me to put here, just put it anyway...

Last edited by KUIPORNG; 01-15-2007 at 09:44 AM.
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Old 01-16-2007, 02:13 PM   #157
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Learning from mistakes, I found out if there are too thick a layer in the compond for one coat, it will crack easily for drying type compound, luckily, in my case, there aren't too many of those, but when laying the pre-mixed compound, don't build a thick layer with one coat, it will crack, get the thickness you need by multiple coat...
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Old 01-18-2007, 08:20 AM   #158
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I tried the Tape shooter last night, it is called somthing like Banjoe... This thing is great, it should be rewarded as one of the best construction tool design of the decade....

my experience is:

- it can tape all seams: inside corner, butted, tapered... all the similar ease

- taping vertical seam is a bit easier than horizontal

- it is fast, you can finish one seam in 2 minutes or faster if you want to be fast.

- I tried the first one not so successful, because I didn't put enough mud in the container, the amount of mud is the driving force to put enough mud on the tape. Once I figure that out, it is as easy as eating a cake.

- Thanks to AtlanticWBConst who highly recommended this tool and I follow his advice... otherwise the counterless seams is going to be a big headache for me...

- With this tool, the outside corner is now for me consider the most difficult to tape .... rather than inside/seam..etc.

- the only challenge I can see is when taping the ceiling which I haven't try yet, I can see it being difficult as the gravity is reverse...
well, even it can only do walls, it is still $50 bucks well spent for me...
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Old 01-18-2007, 12:35 PM   #159
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Wow - Quite a thread, chronicling your project. Keep up the good work. Also, don't nexecarily rely on homecheapo for all your supplies. They can be rediciously expensive for some things.
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Old 01-30-2007, 08:38 AM   #160
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1. Buy those more expensive all-purpose muds... there are a few variaties, I find the more expensive ones get the mudding job easier... don't buy the lowest price one... I tried them all... the more expensive ones seems better...

2. always add a little bit of water and mix the mud with electric mixer rather than directly apply from the package... the mud with a bit of water and after mixed seems to be better and easier to apply

3. Instead of using different sides of knifes, and mud pans... use a 5-6" knife plus a 14x4 inch towel, only these two tools to do most of your mudding work... use the towel to hold the mud... use the knife to apply it... after all the mud almost gone from the towel, trasfer the mud from towel to knife then use the towel to run the smoothing path... and you don't need to use water to wash the tool that way... it is nice and clean... when you are done... the two tools are clean as it started... you only put in small amount of mud to the towel at a time rather than use the mud pan to carry with you a large amount which got dry out...and you need to carry so much tools around...
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Old 01-30-2007, 09:40 AM   #161
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I just came across this website that has demonstrations on mudding.
You might be interested in checking it out.

www.drywallschool.com
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Old 02-01-2007, 08:31 PM   #162
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Originally Posted by BWB View Post
You should be VERY careful who you take advice from as well. I read some posts recommending pressure treated sill plates - it's against code to use PT lumber inside a house, it's toxic.

You also shouldn't strap the walls with 2 x 2's, you won't get the required R value.
Your post is very vague. It is also miss-leading and even sounds COMPLETELY miss-informed.

I suggest that you either put more thought into the wording of your posts or do more research PRIOR to making such a 'blanket or vague statement'.

This forum is for people who need ACCURATE help and information.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-01-2007 at 08:37 PM.
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Old 02-01-2007, 09:50 PM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
Your post is very vague. It is also miss-leading and even sounds COMPLETELY miss-informed.

I suggest that you either put more thought into the wording of your posts or do more research PRIOR to making such a 'blanket or vague statement'.

This forum is for people who need ACCURATE help and information.
Sorry for the confusion, I just realized you're in a COMPLETELY different country where codes are different. Thanks for the lesson. Keep in mind building codes, no matter where you live, are the bare 'minimum requirement', not the best alternative.

A better option than PT indoors is using a foam or poly sillgasket, or a dri-cor subfloor which gives you the dampproofing, and allows airflow at the same time. Great stuff, and no toxic leaching which is a benefit.
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Old 02-02-2007, 07:58 AM   #164
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Originally Posted by BWB View Post
A better option than PT indoors is using a foam or poly sillgasket, or a dri-cor subfloor which gives you the dampproofing, and allows airflow at the same time. Great stuff, and no toxic leaching which is a benefit.

It is required by CODE that all bottom sill plates or other framing members that will be attached dirctly to concrete be TREATED Lumber.

On exteiror walls, Foam sill should be used between the freezewall and the bottom treated plate.

Again, this is REQUIRED CODE in the international building code (IBC), as well as most of the northern continenent in this area.

Please do more research on the composition of Current approved pressure treated lumber:

The following information is off FINE HOME BUILDING's website:

Taking CCA's place as a preservative are two waterborne compounds: alkaline copper quat (ACQ types B and D) and copper azole (CBA-A, CA-B). Sold under the trade names Preserve, NatureWood, and Natural Select, they have been used around the world for up to 15 years. These EPA-approved low-toxicity pesticides resist bugs, mold, and rot as effectively as CCA.

They're safer for the environment... There's no hazardous waste produced in the manufacture of azoles and quat compounds, and lumber treated with these chemicals can be thrown away at the dump. But you still can't burn the stuff because burning copper-based preservatives produces toxic smoke and toxic ashes. And you still need to wear gloves and a dust mask when working with pressure-treated wood.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-02-2007 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 02-02-2007, 09:00 AM   #165
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It is NOT required by code that they be pressure treated - It's required that they be protected from dampness or decay by either using PT, or poly / felt etc. There are 18 other code references regarding PT lumber in Part 9, Part 1 and Part 4.

Why have wood that you need gloves and a mask to handle in your house when there are safer alternatives? i.e. a dri-cor subfloor or plate which allows for air flow, and doesn't leave wood in contact with cement?

Everyone should do more research on modern products and processes and not get stuck with the minimum requirements. You need to understand the full interpretation of the building codes - MINIMUM requirements are not the best building practices.


9.23.2.3. Protection from Dampness
(1) Except as permitted in Sentence (2), wood framing members that are not pressure treated with a wood preservative and which are supported on concrete in contact with the ground or fill shall be separated from the concrete by not less than 0.05 mm polyethylene film or Type S roll roofing.
(2) Dampproofing material referred to in Sentence (1) is not required where the wood member is at least 150 mm above the ground.

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