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2Panther 02-10-2006 09:55 AM

Basement Renovation Project
 
I recently bought a new house (well new to me) and I want to remodel the basement. There was exsisting white wood paneling on the walls and I want to replace it with drywall. I have removed all of the wood paneling and whats left is what I believe to be 1x3's fastened somehow to the concrete block walls. I have a few questions about how to procede. I picked up a drywall book from Home Depot and it talks about using steel studs versus wood studs. I have no experience with either but I think metal might be my choice since I won't need to buy a saw to cut the lengths, just some aviation snips. The wood studs on the right wall will stay as I figure there is no need to take down a wall I can use right? Here is a picture...

http://home.rochester.rr.com/cvaisey...nt%20walls.JPG

My main question is how will I attach the metal studs to the concrete walls? Will the exsisting wood strips need to be removed? Originally there was no electrical outlets on the left wall and far wall and I'd like to add some to each wall. Is there a code or standard on how many per wall and spacing? If I can provide any more information that will help I will do my best as I'm not very knowledgable in this area. Thanks!

2Panther 02-10-2006 06:32 PM

anyone? anyone? echo :D

Bonus 02-10-2006 08:58 PM

I'm not an electrician, so I'm not sure about how to run power down that wall, but if you didn't need power I'd ask why change anything? Just screw drywall to the 1x3's. Put some rigid ins behind it if you like. I also am not very familiar with steel studs so I'll let someone else give you better advice than I would, sorry. :)

2Panther 02-10-2006 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus
I'm not an electrician, so I'm not sure about how to run power down that wall, but if you didn't need power I'd ask why change anything? Just screw drywall to the 1x3's. Put some rigid ins behind it if you like. I also am not very familiar with steel studs so I'll let someone else give you better advice than I would, sorry. :)

This space will eventually become my home theatre so I'd like outlets on the far and left walls for various lamps and or devices so putting drywall right on top of the 1x3's won't give me enough space for an outlet. Thanks for the reply though!

2Panther 02-10-2006 09:51 PM

the more I think about this project the more questions I have!

most of the directions I've read on the internet about installing steel framing say to mark on the ceiling and floors where I want the wall to go but if I'm framing the left hand and far walls I can't do that because of the gap along the floor and walls where I guess water would channel into the sump pump?

Thoughts?

Mike Swearingen 02-11-2006 01:59 PM

Before you do anything, check with your Building Inspection Department for all local codes, permit and inspection requirements.
You're going to need these anyway. They can help guide you as to what you need to do.
Personally, if I were going to add electrical all around, I would build 2X4 walls (steel or wood) all around.
If you don't want to buy tools, you can rent what you need, although for a major project like this, it would probably pay to buy a few basics, including power tools necessary for most of the work.
Good Luck!
Mike

Aceinstaller 02-12-2006 08:17 AM

Mikes got the right idea.:) Definately get some info on the local codes in the area.

I would start out by framin the exteriors with 2x4s, wood or metal, just make sure that the stud in the wall are spaced no more than 16" on center. I suggest insulating with r-13 paper or plastic faced insulation(check with local code). Also, in residential wood is usually preferred in basements becaus it is usually better to us a pressure treated bottom plate to avoid any rot due to moisture.(metal has a tendancy to rust when in contact with moisture)

COde for the electrical outlets vary from county to county, so I would definately decide where my enertainment system was going and run a designated circuit or two (depending on the amount of equiptment you are using...plasma tv,satellite,cable,phone,etc.:D ) then take the info from your local codes for how many linear feet of wall space between any outlets. One more electrical question would be.... is there going to be a computer? computers should have cat-7 or better ran for the phone line, or just a cable if you are using a cable motum, a designated grounded circuit for the oulet(to avoid power surge problems) This sound like a lot of things to think about, but to a licensed electrician all you would have to tell him is where the entertainment system is and where the computer would be and he should be finished
within a couple of days and it should be a relatively inexpensive project. I would save the trouble and get some quotes.

After the electric is in, ensure that the heating can be installed by bringing 6 or 7' runs from the trunk line to the ceiling. I would definately need a more accurate size of the room and the actual insulation that you decide to install to give you a number of heats and returns.

Then comes the drywall. Make sure to hold up the drywall 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch from the floor to avoid water damage to the drywall in case of minor flooding. this will be covered by the baseboard so don't worry.:p

That should pretty much cover the basics.... good luck on your new project! And be safe!
:D

KUIPORNG 02-13-2006 08:24 AM

I am renovating my basement right now with steel studs/tracks. I am quite please with it mainly because of its ease of installation. but you kind of need a metal saw if you have a lot to cut, cutting everything by hand will hurt your hand muscle. I bought a new metal saw from EBay at $80 CAD. Looks like you don't have a lot of stuff to cut, so may be you are ok. To avoid water to the metal track, there is a solution, which I am using, to put big thick plastic with small cylinders on the floor, and OSB wood on it, that will make your floor dri-core type insulated from water, on the other hand, if there is no leak problem in your basement, you do not need to worry about rusting. Wood have the advantageous of being more supportive, but steel have the advantageous of being easy to install and being straight. Both will work.


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