Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-12-2006, 03:07 PM   #121
Member
 
yummy mummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,725
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


Thanks for the information about your experiences with your basement reno.

I think I have thought out the project. At least at this point I think I have. I may change how I feel later.

There is no plumbing in my place that I have to move. The only electrical that I want is 7 extra outlets and possibly 10 pot lights. That is it with electrical.

At this point, I think that it is pretty straight forward.
I, like, Kui****g, would love to entertain another form of ceiling, other than drywall, but my ceiling is only 7 feet tall and that would cut into my headspace.

So, I will stick with drywall, I think.

I also am curious as to why the panelling did not work out.

I personally was thinking about panelling, but I really don't like the look.

As to the power actuated fastener; I have not tried it yet.
My concrete is approximately 60 years old, in the basement.
I really hope they will work.


Appreciate your input.

yummy mummy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 10:29 PM   #122
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Angry

basement renovation


The Armstrong ceiling was very inexpensive, check Home Depot for prices (provide perimeter in linear feet and area in square feet in order to determine how many wall angles, main tees, cross tees, and tiles are required. I don't understand why anybody would deal with the expense, hassle, and painful labor involved with sheetrock in any ceiling let alone a basement. One of the previous replies to this original thread referred to making a map opf your utilities so that if you had a leak you could locate the source, and then cut open a ceiling , make utility repairs and then patch the ceiling. I personally think that is nuts.
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 10:39 PM   #123
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Thumbs up

basement renovation


I was trying to make the most of at best 6'6" ceiling clearance (after ceramic tile) with the Armstrong suspended ceiling. I installed it approximately 21/2 -3" below joist height for a finished ceiling of around 6'2". It cost (for around 660 sq. ft. of the main bar area) $600-700 and took three of us about (2) days to install without any special tools or hassles. I did not require any hired laor to load, transport, or unload it. I have used a rented sheetrock jack in my barn to install 7/16" OSB ceilings and it is still a two man job and no piece of cake at that.
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 11:00 PM   #124
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Smile

basement renovation


Th ceiling joists are rough-sawn chestnut and and vary in height by about 1/2-3/4" so furring would have been necessary.
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 06:43 AM   #125
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

basement renovation


Sheetrock ceilings are actually not that hard to put on a basement ceiling...
They can look much better than a 'commercial-looking' armstrong tile ceiling.
That is just my personal opinion.....Tho, out of the 500 or so basements we have remodeled, I would say that about 70 percent go with the sheetrock ceilings...
(What we do with areas that require access, is to simply...put an 'access panel' where shut-offs or other utilities may be - these are white, the same color as the ceilings so they don't stand out at all)
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 08:41 AM   #126
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,861
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


I think Colonel has a point for DIYers, whereas for contractors like AtlanticWBConst, nothing is difficults... so everyone will go for the look... but I still don't understand the pricing... apart from labours... material costs for sheetrocks should be lower than drop ceiling... that is why I choose sheetrock as I am going to DIY and labour cost is not counted... please correct me if this is not correct for material cost comparison...
KUIPORNG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:31 AM   #127
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Default

basement renovation


The walls were bowed out in the middle and from one end to another. I had to run four courses of furring, each strip had to be shimmed along its length to get a straight line and each course had to be shimmed to the next in order to stay plumb. Since the wall was bowed out in the middle, I started with the middle course and then did the courses above and below. The finished product looks great (to me) and I receive many compliments but if I were to do the job for someone else under similiar circumstances I would recommend building a wall which I can do in a day.
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:37 AM   #128
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,861
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


thanks for the explanation, Colonel, one more question for your ceiling,

Is there any portion of ceiling in your basement significant lower, like 1 feet, than the rest, in my case I do... if you also do, how do you handle the difference in height using drop ceiling approach? I suppose in my case I can do a partial drywall for that lower portion and the major other parts use drop ceiling... don't know if this is strange looking.... did I answer the question myself?... or you have better suggestions...
KUIPORNG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:40 AM   #129
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Default

basement renovation


I should mention the other option (also from Armstrong), in my wine cellar (which I built first, priorities you know) I used an Armstrong "Easy-Up" Tin-Look ceiling which attaches to tracks with clips, this allows you to fasten the tracks directly (shimming as necessary) to the joists and saves at least 2" of headroom. There is no exposed framing and it looks exactly like a tin ceiling. also you can still remove the panels for access. Armstrong also offers Easy-Up in plank form which I have in the master bedroom these are white woodgrain textured random length planks that attach to the same tracks with the same clips. My other main problem in my basement was that there were sevceral areas requiring ceiling access to utilities, SAT cable etc. so with drywall I would need 6-8 access panels at least.
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:47 AM   #130
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Default

basement renovation


I didn't see your question before my last post. No, my floor to ceiling relationship is the same. But my friend who helped me has done alot of 50-60's ranch house basements in the area that have variations in ceiling height. In those cases he installs VERTICAL ceiling panels to bridge the gap from higher to lower ceilings. He also mentioned that sometimes doorways are f"d up and he adds sloped track on each side with the panel angled up or down to meet the door casing.
I would be happy to post pictures (I have quite a few) can you tell me how to do so? Also they are fairly high-resolution, what size would be best (I don't want to slow down everyone's computers)?
Colonel Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:57 AM   #131
Member
 
yummy mummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,725
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


I also would like to see the pictures.
And I also have different height on certain parts of my basement,
ie. furnact ducts that drop down approx. 1 foot, making that area 6 ft. height.
yummy mummy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 12:04 PM   #132
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,861
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


Hi Colonel,

I am not sure the best way of posting pictures...I used the kind of dump way by linking to Yahoo's picutres... which is not too good at resolution....

Regarding the drop ceiling, I checked the pricing at HD, the contractor types which is the office dump looking types are somthing like 70 cents per sq.ft... the more good looking types are somewhat $2 per sq. ft... if you want the good looking type, the tiles alone cost $2000 dollars, not to count the accessories... for sheet what, it is about 30 cents per sq. ft. so a 1000 sq. ft only cost $300 dollars, that alone is 6 times different in cost...

that probably be the main reason why people go with drywall.. even for contractor, they probably don't want to spent such money to cutdown their profit...

Last edited by KUIPORNG; 10-13-2006 at 12:49 PM.
KUIPORNG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2006, 08:49 PM   #133
Member
 
yummy mummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,725
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


I also had to return my Remington tool, as I found it too loud and did not like the smell that it created.

It did work for me though.

So I purchased a hammer drill, and will try to work with that.
yummy mummy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2006, 10:07 PM   #134
Member
 
yummy mummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,725
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


I have purchased pressure treated 2 X 4s but I find them expensive, as they are 5 dollars each.

What did you do instead?
And how did you do it.

Can I use vapor barrier plastic that I have from the insullation that I removed?

Do I just put it under the 2 X 4, and then screw it between the wood and concrete floor?
yummy mummy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2006, 08:21 AM   #135
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,861
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

basement renovation


Hi Yummy mummy,

Presure treated wood is more expensive like you said, the cheapest way is to use what you described, some sort of plastics, builders who did a couples of bottome plates in our basement even worst, they use garbage bags type plastics, which is thinner then the vapour barrier you are talking about... Home Depot also selling some precutted form type sil materials for that purpose, it is more professional look and easier to handle as it won't slip through, but practically any different than plastic, probably not...

However, I am sure there are people here to advice you to stay with pressure treated wood as it offer better protection from wood damaging in case of too much water leak in the basement at any accident...

so the bottom line, it is really a personal favour and no fix rule... but if you did apply for a permit, you might want to double check if they accept plastic as separator... I believe the code requirement is minimum and therefore they should, just to be sure... but sounds like you didn't apply for a permit and then this is not a concern either...

KUIPORNG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need a HVAC return vent in basement? westing HVAC 13 04-03-2014 01:43 AM
Basement Renovation Question KUIPORNG Remodeling 234 08-26-2008 08:19 AM
Basement - need to bust up about 1 ft deeper FallenAngel Building & Construction 7 08-15-2007 09:09 AM
Sub Basement Walkout - Please Help pgs_28 Building & Construction 11 08-12-2007 09:55 PM
Pex vs copper in basement renovation Mikedks Plumbing 23 09-22-2006 02:32 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.