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Old 10-09-2006, 11:13 AM   #106
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There is a pipe right in the corner, all the way along the entire wall, where I have to install my top plate. It is approx. 1 1/2 to 2 inches in diameter. Should I just put the top plate in front of it, which would mean that I would be leaving approximate 1 1/2 to 2 inches away from the block wall before I start my stud work? Or is there something else that I should do? I don't really mind losing that amount of space on this wall..
Y.M. - Yes, you should be doing that anyway. You want to leave a space about 1 1/2" to 2" away from your block wall. You need this area for air circulation between all your new walls and the block walls.

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Also, when the studs are put 16 inches on center, does that mean that there is exactly a 16 inch opening between one stud and the other?
Y.M., that is not what that means. What it means is: From the center of your first stud to the center of your next stud, the measurement should be exactly 16".

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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 10-09-2006 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 10-10-2006, 09:30 AM   #107
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I think I understand.

I do understand 16 inches on center. (Center point of one stud, to the center point of the other stud is 16 inches.)

Therefore, as I figure, the empty space in between the 2 studs is always going to be 14 1/2 inches?
Is this correct?


thanks
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Old 10-10-2006, 10:03 AM   #108
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if measuring from center is too difficult to do, I always do measuring from left to left or right to right edge of the stud, 16 inches, it is the same effect... so the space your are talking about would be 16 minus width of the stud... try to do this measuring good, it will help later on when doing insulation as insulation are precutted expecting this dimension...

about the other question you posted earlier regarding pipes...etc. you need to build coners here or there in situations like this... it is always not possible to build a complete square 4 side walls in any room due to obstacles by the pipes... etc...
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Old 10-10-2006, 10:09 AM   #109
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thanks for the info. kui****g.

So the space inbetween the studs (empty space is 14 1/2 inches)
Is this correct.

If this is correct then I am measuring right.

Regarding the pipe.
I think I will go with what Atlantic said, and move away from the wall, as this is a small pipe and I don't think that I need to build around it.
But like you said, I do have to build around other obstacles.

Will let you know.
I have to get this stud measuring right before I start.
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Old 10-10-2006, 10:18 AM   #110
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14 and half inches, that is right.... but you know the width of the stud may varys.... in theory ... you should measure from left to left edge to be 16 inches rather than spacing equal 14.5 inches... however... this is more academic than practical as in your case, you probably know the width of the stud is fixed at 1.5 inches...

anyhow... I myself, wouldn't move the entire wall away for 2 inches to give way for the pipe, because there are two problems I see for doing this: 1. you lose space, 2. how you can keep the insulation falling off to these 2 inches spaces, well I am sure you can do somthing...but a space behind also not as good efficency on insulating the room I believe as cold air can travel freely behind the wall... I think building corner is more works than material costs... anyhow... it is not the end of the world... you can still do it either way...
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Old 10-10-2006, 01:07 PM   #111
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thanks for the information.

I now have it straight.
I think I will measure from left side of stud to left side of other stud, since my measuring tape has a red colour "16, 32, etc." and that is easier to remember.

Thanks a lot to both of you, Atlantic and Kui****g.
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:28 AM   #112
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Kui****g

How are you lifting the drywall?
Especially to the ceiling?

Do you have a drywall lift, and would you know if they rent them out?

Also, how are you getting the drywall to your basement once it is delivered.

I know I am not at that stage yet, but I am currious.
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:35 AM   #113
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Good questions:

HD delivered drywall to your house (I think driveway only) for $60 bucks regardless of quantities.

They rent drywall lifter for $40 per day which suppose to be used by single person. but I am not going to rent one, as my cousin happens in town I will borrow his hand instead. For that, you need two T-shaped stand (self made by 2x4) at height of wall plus a little bit to hold the drywall onto the ceiling... I also purchased a $100 moving cart stand from Canadian Tire which I intend to put the drywall on top then use the Tshaped to hold it up then stand on it for screwing... all that in my mind only... will let you know how it goes...

I need to take off the door(s) for various location to help ease of transporting the drywalls down to the basement... I haven't tried yet but I think it can be barely done... it is indeed a valid concern. my co-worker has to take out part of their carpeted floor/subfloor to do the same transportation... I couldn't do the same and don't want to as I am hardwooded....

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Old 10-11-2006, 02:36 PM   #114
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You have it all planned out.
Good for you.
I hope it works out.
Let me know

When I am ready for my drywall, can I not bring it with another person through my side door?
The drywall is only 4 feet wide and my door is taller than that.
Is this how you are bringing it down the basement?

I sure hope I don't have to take any door out.

Also, can I not use 3/8 inch thick drywall for the ceiling and wall, as this is lighter?
What do you think?
Or maybe just 3/8 inch for ceiling?

I think I will also end up making a T bar.
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Old 10-11-2006, 02:47 PM   #115
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the book said ceiling drywall should be thicker rather than thinner than the walls... but AtlanticWBConst said 0.5" inch is fine... now you remind me about 3/8 thickness.... I don't know if I want to do that... because looks like the norm is 0.5" and you see home depot selling them like the standard by the way they display it.... I probably stick by that to avoid unforeseen problem.... but other people are welcome to comment about this point....

everyhouse layout is different so bring in drywalls probably different in my case than yours... but sounds like yours is easier as you have a side door right in front of the basement entry where in mine is 90 degree...
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Old 10-11-2006, 03:24 PM   #116
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I would use 1/2" for everything. If you start getting different sizes you have to make sure you get the right amount of each. If you get all one size you don't have to worry about that. Also if you are going to drywall the ceiling in your basement, take pictures of the pipes and such before you drywall. Then when you get a leak you know exactly where the pipe is in the ceiling. Usually when you see a water stain in the ceiling, it is not where the leak is it is where the water pooled.
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Old 10-11-2006, 07:01 PM   #117
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When I am ready for my drywall, can I not bring it with another person through my side door?.
Yes, you can. You can also check to see if there is a local Drywall supply warehouse in your area and see what their price difference s to have it delivered and brought into your house.

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The drywall is only 4 feet wide and my door is taller than that.
Is this how you are bringing it down the basement?
I sure hope I don't have to take any door out.
Should be no problems. No, you should NOT have to take the door out.

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Also, can I not use 3/8 inch thick drywall for the ceiling and wall, as this is lighter?What do you think?Or maybe just 3/8 inch for ceiling?
I think I will also end up making a T bar.
Use 1/2 ". We only use 3/8" when we 'go over' bad plaster or have to make up on thicknesses.
Stick with the residential industry standard 1/2".
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Old 10-11-2006, 10:07 PM   #118
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Thank goodness that I can eventually bring drywall into the house, or
else, if I had to dismantle my home to get this drywall in, I think I was about ready to quit right now.

I did purchase today, a power actuated fastener.
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Old 10-12-2006, 11:18 AM   #119
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I finished my 1100 sq. ft. basement last year and can offer some advice. My house is an 1878 Italianate Victorian in Mass. My basement walls were built by an inebriated mason, very uneven and with excess mortar everrywhere. I first wirebrushed and vacuumed the walls and brick columns to remove all the exfoliating mortar and then put on (2) coats of UGL brick sealer (the thick white mud stuff) using a wallpaper brush. For the main bar area I wanted T&G paneling and wanted to maximize space so I furred the walls with 1x3" spruce; this was a big mistake, I had to shim out up to 2" in places and the whole job was a time consuming nightmare. I used a hammer drill and TAPCON concrete screws ( which worked pretty well much better and easier than masonry nails). It would have been faster and easier to just frame up new walls. The ceiling was a major problem as it had electrical and plumbing everywhere below the joists, I had to move a lot of it in order to maximize headroom for the dropped ceiling. For the bottom plates I bought a Remington powder actuated gun and fasteners which wouldn't penetrate the concrete floor sufficiently; I returned it and went with the TAPCONS (as above) which again worked fine. With the minimal headroom I had to get creative with the HVAC ducting which runs along an outside wall, I went to a low-profile rectangular duct and built an enclosure 17' long out of Birch ply (stained and poly'd) . Around an angled soil pipe I built a tapered trapezoidal enclosure out of sheet Copper which turned out very nicely. The main thing I would emphasize is to really think everything through before starting; especially electrical, HVAC, plumbing, lighting etc. I installed an Armstrong Tin-look dropped ceiling which I believe is the best type for a basement as you retain good access to all the overhead utilities, is easy to install, looks good and allows replacement of individual tiles as needed.
Good Luck with your project.
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Old 10-12-2006, 11:25 AM   #120
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Could you show pictures on your installed ceiling... I having bought drywall yet and may want to consider all options before committing... why would you not go with drywall ceilings if you have limited headroom space?

Just off to HD to check the ceiling options... obviously, suspended ceiling offer advantageous of accessible to ceiling inside ....

anyhow I will stay with my plan with drywall in my case... after taking into consideration of cost, look, space...etc.


just interested in exactly what is the meaning of this statement: "For the main bar area I wanted T&G paneling and wanted to maximize space so I furred the walls with 1x3" spruce; this was a big mistake, I had to shim out up to 2" in places and the whole job was a time consuming nightmare. "
if you don't mind providing more details... for curiorsity and knowledge/experience sake

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