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Old 09-15-2006, 01:06 PM   #31
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Kui****g:

thanks for the insight about the insullation and needing more.

I will have to purchase more.



thanks

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Old 09-15-2006, 05:20 PM   #32
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Yummy,

Don't worry about the insulation 'hurting' you. It won't damage your health. It's just that the small fibers go everywhere and are an irritant.....it's the itchy fibers.

A point about insulation: DO NOT flatten or condense it. That squashes the air cell fibers. Those cells are what keep the warm air 'in' the living space. When it is flattened, condensed, squashed.....this damages it's insulation abilities.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 09-15-2006 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:59 PM   #33
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atlantic:

you are so full of knowledge. I thank you for your time and valuable information.

You sound quite professional and definitely know what you are doing.

If the insullation seems squashed and flat, can I poof it out again with my hands?

Does that work.
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Old 09-16-2006, 05:51 AM   #34
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Yes, you want it to be at it's 'expanded' point.
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Old 09-17-2006, 09:34 PM   #35
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I have a question about electric screwdrivers.
Should I purchase one so it would make my work easier when putting in the 2X4s? .....as opposed to using a regular screwdriver.

Is this what would make my work easier and faster, or a drill; but I thought that drills were just for making holes or do they have different bits that I can add to put in screws?

Will this also work for putting screws into concrete?

Would you recommend any one in particular, that would not be too expensive?



Thanks a bunch.......
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Old 09-18-2006, 06:06 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
I have a question about electric screwdrivers.
Should I purchase one so it would make my work easier when putting in the 2X4s? .....as opposed to using a regular screwdriver.?
Don't waste your money. These are really only for light duty...cover plates, small screws, etc...

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Is this what would make my work easier and faster, or a drill;
?
For the value, I would suggest buying a corded Power drill.
You could purchase a cordless drill, but you will end up spending alot for a decent model. Cheap cordless versions don't stand up to regular use and don't hold a charge long. That is why I suggest a decent corded power drill.
However, the long term: You will get alot more practical use out of a cordless drill.

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Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
but I thought that drills were just for making holes or do they have different bits that I can add to put in screws?
Yes, You can purchase a quick-change bit holder and philips head bits or really any kind of 'bit' imaginable.

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Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
Will this also work for putting screws into concrete?
Not really. Regular power drills aren't made to drill into really dense material like concrete. You can burn out the motor.
They make what is called a 'hammer' drill for that. It's a larger, heavier (Heavy duty) drill that has more torque and force for drilling into cement, stone, mortar.

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Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
Would you recommend any one in particular, that would not be too expensive??
Ooohhh, you'd have to ask that question. I'm kind of sold on the known names in the industry(Dewalt, Milwaukee, Bosch, Hilti....) Unfortunately, these cost a little more. But, they do last much longer and take a 'beating' better than the inexpensive models.

However, the needs that you put on tools are not going to be as demanding as ours.

What might be in your price range and fit your needs:

Black & Decker, Ryobi or Skil. Check out their 'cordless' and their 'corded' models. Some come with tool attachements and bits already in the box.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 09-18-2006 at 06:12 AM.
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Old 09-18-2006, 07:55 AM   #37
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One more to add, if you use wood plates and studs, you cannot drill in screws, you have to use nails...

but if you use steel plates and wood studs... you can use screws for most of the stuff... and this is the easiest method, I experienced...
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Old 09-18-2006, 08:18 AM   #38
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kui****g

My home was renovated about 3 years ago, and I noticed that they used screws in all the stud work that they did.

I thought that screws is what you are suppose to use for wood studs/.
Am I wrong?

Do I have to get my hammer out?
I do have one of those.
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Old 09-18-2006, 08:25 AM   #39
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screws for wood to wood, is not as strong as nails... especially 45 degree... people use nail gun generally... your other job, I don't know why they do that... probably to save labour or they don't have a nail gun...

for your information, why use wood plates... use steel plates, you will find the job 2 times easier, as you don't need to do 45 degree screws, instead, straight screw in...

unless you are building load baring walls...which is rarely for basement renovation...
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Old 09-18-2006, 11:46 AM   #40
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kui****g

steel plates?
do you mean steel studs?
how would you attach drywall to these steel studs?
using screws for steel?

how would I cut steel?

did you use only steel studs for your basement?
how about when I need to cover my vents, did you also use steel for them.

I just figured it would be easier with wood because you can cut it to any size you want?


Thanks for your help.
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Old 09-18-2006, 12:37 PM   #41
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I went with steel studs and steel plates for 40% of my basement, the other 60% is wood studs and steel plates later when I discovered that was the best way....

I mean wood studs on steel plate... I know no body talked about that combination, but it is the best way of building no-baring walls.. easy, strong...etc.

Also, please read the other thread of mine "Basement Question" that record the whole cycle of my project, make sure you read to the end though as there is change opinion over the course of my experience.... at the last message, there is also pictures of what I recently finished to...

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Old 09-18-2006, 03:14 PM   #42
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thanks kui****g

I will check your threads, and let you know.
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Old 09-18-2006, 06:24 PM   #43
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Yummy,

We do alot of steel framing in the commercial jobs we do.

Kui****g is right about the fact that screws don't have the sheer strength of nails...infact nails are code for structural wood framing, not screws.

BUT, we are not talking about you building structural framing. You are going to build partition walls. Your walls are not holding up a second floor or weight bearing loads of ANY kind. So there is not a need for sheer strength in your fasteners. So, YES, you can use screws for what you want to do.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 09-19-2006 at 05:38 AM.
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Old 09-18-2006, 06:30 PM   #44
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Yummy,

We have been framing with steel and wood for over 20 years in both commercial and residential applications.

My suggestion: Stay away from using steel studs. There is a larger learning curve with steel framing than wood.
Framing in steel requires knowledge of sheetrocking, since it is the sheetrock that actually gives the steel framing it's ridgidity. So there are alot of intricacies involved with doing it properly.
(Example: Where 2 walls meet perpendicularly, you should leave a space for the sheetrock to 'slide' through. That means you are supposed to attach the top and bottom plates. However, you need to cut out a space in the corners of the top and bottom plates that is 1/8" larger than the width of the sheetrock you are using. Then, when you are sheetrocking, you are supposed to slide the sheetrock through that space and screw it from behind, into the other wall's steel corner, to 'inter-lock' the 2 walls together....easy!!, doesn't that make perfect sense? ....um, you see my point...)

Stick to 'wood on wood' using screws. You will be much happier you did.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 09-19-2006 at 05:47 AM.
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Old 09-18-2006, 09:00 PM   #45
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Atlantic:

My inclination is to stick with wood, as I have been doing some research on steel studs and as you mentioned there are other factors to consider when using them.

I have worked with wood before, so I am somewhat familiar with wood and not steel.
I certainly agree that there would definitely be a bigger learning curve to steel studs. (and I certainly am a novice at this and I don't think I need any more novelty).

I think I will stop researching steel studs and pursue wood.


thanks for the help

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