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Old 02-19-2008, 04:15 PM   #1
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Basement remodel time.


I am in the demo phase of the basement remodel and am therefore trying to make sure the construction plan is well planned out. So, far I have decided on a dricore sub floor, laminate padding and then laminate floor. I plan on laying all the dricore then placing 1" XPS on the walls. I think I will frame with 2"x2" on top of the dricore and then attach drywall to the ceiling then walls. Is the is adequate for a moisture and vapor barrier? Also what is the best way to insulate the sill plate? I am thinking xps and great stuff. I know the drywall should be a 1/4" off the floor, does this go for the XPS also? How do I attach the XPS to the wall? I assume glue and then tape the joints.
On a different note, and maybe this should go in a different thread. Local code states a window in the basement bedroom must be a minimum of 44" off the floor. Ours is of course 47" now we planned on just building up the floor, but we would then not have 7' between floor and ceiling which is a code violation. So, our options are: 1. build the bedroom so the the back door is in the room (it is a walkout basement. 2. Cut the concrete down so it is 44" off the ground and install a new window. Is option 2 even possible. I hope so because I really don't like option 1.
Thanks,

Ben


Last edited by Bcoleman6; 02-19-2008 at 04:29 PM. Reason: Add some more questions.
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Old 02-26-2008, 03:14 PM   #2
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Basement remodel time.


If you worry so much about the codes, why don't you apply the permit first before any constructions... then let the permit people tell you what to do... as you can ask millions free consultation questions (after you pay the permit fee)...

I heard people use 2x3 but never heard of 2x2 to do framing... even 2x3 I doubit it complies with codes... but why not go with the standard 2x4....

and dricore is an expensive choice, for the same result you can use OSB board on top of those hard plastic sheet....it cost 1/3 of the dricore...

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Old 02-26-2008, 05:58 PM   #3
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Basement remodel time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...So, far I have decided on a dricore sub floor, laminate padding and then laminate floor. I plan on laying all the dricore then placing 1" XPS on the walls. I think I will frame with 2"x2" on top of the dricore and then attach drywall to the ceiling then walls.
I think your choice of sub floor material and finish floor materials are good. http://www.dricore.com/en/eIndex.aspx
Question: Are you sure that you printed the 2" x 2" framing dimensions correctly? That is not a feasible plan for constructing partition walls.

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Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...
Is the is adequate for a moisture and vapor barrier?
Dricore considers their product's bottom layer as a vapor barrier.

From the Dricore site:
http://www.dricore.com/en/aboutus.aspx-
"DRIcore is a floating subfloor made with a raised high density polyethylene moisture barrier base bonded to an engineered Random Wafer board designed to allow air to flow underneath the subfloor system keeping floors warm and dry."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...
Also what is the best way to insulate the sill plate?
What walls will be on the concrete? I am confused, you stated this earlier:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...So, far I have decided on a dricore sub floor,..... I think I will frame.....on top of the dricore.....
I am not sure if you are talking about your new wall sill plates, or your existing home's sill plates (mud sills)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...
I am thinking xps and great stuff. I know the drywall should be a 1/4" off the floor, does this go for the XPS also?
It is not necessary to install the XPS off the floor.
As far as installing the sheetrock 1/4" off the floor, doing so is very little protection, in terms of, avoiding mold and mildew. I suggest that you consider these options below:

1.) Paperless sheetrock on the lower areas, and XP Board on the upper areas.
2.) Paperless sheetrock everywhere.

Information:

XP Board (mold/mildew resistant core, and treated paper surface): http://www.nationalgypsum.com/products/product69.aspx

Paperless Sheetrock (Mold/mildew resistant core, and surface material): http://www.gp.com/BUILD/product.aspx?pid=4659

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Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...
How do I attach the XPS to the wall? I assume glue and then tape the joints.
Yes, glue and tyvek tape would be my recommendation.

Tyvek Tape: http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Constru...ucts/tape.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcoleman6 View Post
...
On a different note, and maybe this should go in a different thread. Local code states a window in the basement bedroom must be a minimum of 44" off the floor. Ours is of course 47" now we planned on just building up the floor, but we would then not have 7' between floor and ceiling which is a code violation. So, our options are: 1. build the bedroom so the the back door is in the room (it is a walkout basement. 2. Cut the concrete down so it is 44" off the ground and install a new window. Is option 2 even possible. I hope so because I really don't like option 1.
IMHO, I'd go with Option 1: Leaving the walkout door for entertainment use/access and direct means of egress. Cut out the lower area of the window opening for code-required bedroom means of egress.
This really is not a difficult option, nor an expensive one (if you hire out the cutting - which I recommend you do.... Generally, the cutting rates are based on SF or cubic feet, and you don't have that much to cut out)

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-26-2008 at 06:03 PM.
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Old 03-01-2008, 08:13 AM   #4
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Basement remodel time.


The amount of insulation you would need is dependent on where you live(another code). Your plan might work in Georgia, not so much in Maine.
As to the floor, there are many laminates that are not recommended for below grade. If you find one that is, you will need to put down a dual purpose foam/plastic backing down as the dricore is not sealed at the seams and miosture can migrate up.
Ron
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Old 03-01-2008, 10:09 AM   #5
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....the dricore is not sealed at the seams and miosture can migrate up.
Ron
The average basement floor will be fine with a system like Dricore.

In such a situation, where there is so-much moisture eminating in a basement, that it would be saturating the underside of the Dricore air circulation compartment (space underneath), and rising up thru the Dricore seams....then a property owner has ALOT more to worry about than what kind of carpet they plan on installing.

That large of an amount of moisture would have to be addressed, and corrected, before attempting to finish even 1 square inch of such an environment.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 03-01-2008 at 10:17 AM.
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Old 03-01-2008, 11:01 AM   #6
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Basement remodel time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
The average basement floor will be fine with a system like Dricore.

In such a situation, where there is so-much moisture eminating in a basement, that it would be saturating the underside of the Dricore air circulation compartment (space underneath), and rising up thru the Dricore seams....then a property owner has ALOT more to worry about than what kind of carpet they plan on installing.

That large of an amount of moisture would have to be addressed, and corrected, before attempting to finish even 1 square inch of such an environment.
The, "sealing the seams", related to the plastic you would need to put down under the laminate floor he mentioned. Even though the laminated floor wasn't directly on concrete, it was close enough to take the extra step with the plastic or the dual underlayment with the foam/plastic integrated into one sheet.
Ron
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Old 03-01-2008, 11:36 AM   #7
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Basement remodel time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
The, "sealing the seams", related to the plastic you would need to put down under the laminate floor he mentioned. Even though the laminated floor wasn't directly on concrete, it was close enough to take the extra step with the plastic or the dual underlayment with the foam/plastic integrated into one sheet.
Ron
I understand your point. Humid air, as opposed to direct moisture.

It's the same concept of why we always use roofing felt on 1st floor (above basement) hardwood installs and rooms above garages.
It's about any humid air, that can affect wood/fiber-product flooring placed above an area of concrete.

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