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swalke2 12-16-2008 01:29 PM

Another basement
 
Hi my name is Steve and this is my first post.

I am getting ready to start a unfinished basement remodel and had a question.

House is 20+ years old and has water treated Cinder block walls on the outside below grade and inside as well. I have also had a company come out within the last year to make sure there was no heaving on my walls. There will need to be a drop ceiling to replace the one that used to be there and due to duct work etc... I live in Atlanta Georgia.

My plan is to attach 2x4's to the cinder block walls using Tapcon screws with the 4" part of 2x4 against the wall(flat) 16" O.C to save space and then using Pink Rigid insulation between the 2x4s attached directly to the block walls with some sort of adhesive. I will use 1/4" beaded paneling for walls.

Questions:
1) Is this an acceptable way to build a wall?
2)How do I determine how thick my insulation should be?
3) What is a good adhesive to use

Thanks for any advice

steve

jogr 12-16-2008 02:25 PM

Check with your local authorities. You might need drywall covering the foam to get the required burn through time. They will also know what R value insulation you should use.

No point using 2x4s, you could use 2x2s or you could use the foam board that is grooved out for 1x3 furring strips.

Or you could just build a "normal" 2x4 wall. Some folks would get tired of putting in all those tapcons and would find it easier to nail up a wall.

Be aware that you will need enough wall thickness for electrical boxes.

swalke2 12-16-2008 02:33 PM

Ill check on that burn time.

I actually found a box that is made for that voltage and that is narrow enough for a 2x4 on flat.

Thanks!

jogr 12-16-2008 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swalke2 (Post 198874)
I actually found a box that is made for that voltage and that is narrow enough for a 2x4 on flat.

Thanks!

What's it's wire fill capacity? Some of the dinky boxes can only handle a terminal end (one romex in and none out) and don't have enough capacity to put in the middle of a run (1 romex in and one out).

swalke2 12-16-2008 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jogr (Post 198884)
What's it's wire fill capacity? Some of the dinky boxes can only handle a terminal end (one romex in and none out) and don't have enough capacity to put in the middle of a run (1 romex in and one out).

Looks to be enough for one in, maybe "middle of a run" but my intention is to put a Junction box in the ceiling for each wall and then run a drop from the junction box to the outlet box (probaby 2 per wall).

jogr 12-16-2008 03:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swalke2 (Post 198891)
Looks to be enough for one in, maybe "middle of a run" but my intention is to put a Junction box in the ceiling for each wall and then run a drop from the junction box to the outlet box (probaby 2 per wall).

The box will have a fill limit based upon it's volume.

All those junction boxes in the ceiling (which must remain forevermore accessible) sound like a real pain and will be an obvious diy job. Doing it right with the correct wall boxes is easier, better, cheaper and faster.

swalke2 12-16-2008 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jogr (Post 198893)
The box will have a fill limit based upon it's volume.

All those junction boxes in the ceiling (which must remain forevermore accessible) sound like a real pain and will be an obvious diy job. Doing it right with the correct wall boxes is easier, better, cheaper and faster.


Yeah I see what your saying, but I think no matter what I would have to bring the electrical up the wall. The 2x4's are flat against the wall and can really be drilled. There is also a drop ceiling that will always be in place.

How do I determine the fill limit of the box?

Thanks for the help

RobandStacey 12-16-2008 05:20 PM

I'm still not sure why you do not want to build just a "normal" 2x4 wall spaced 1/2'' from your cinderblock wall. This helps with your electrical boxes, for hanging anything on walls (it gives you the 4 inches instead of 2 to screw anything heavy into), also and possibly most important it will ensure you have straight walls. Your cinder block walls may not be true, by building your own walls you will make sure that all of your walls are straight. Just some ideas, it is up to you in the end.

stubborn1 12-16-2008 08:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swalke2 (Post 198891)
Looks to be enough for one in, maybe "middle of a run" but my intention is to put a Junction box in the ceiling for each wall and then run a drop from the junction box to the outlet box (probaby 2 per wall).

Use a 4x4 box with a plaster ring to bring it back to a single gang. You can get the required capacity to run a circuit in and out without adding boxes above the ceiling.

As the others have suggested, I would just frame a 2x4 wall in front of the block unless you have a serious space constraint. You'll thank yourself later.

Jeeper1970 12-17-2008 01:25 PM

Does your building code allow you to attach the studs directly to the cinder block, whether treated or not?

I agree with the others. Build the walls conventionally, leaving a 1/2" gap between the 2x4's and cinder block.

bjbatlanta 12-17-2008 02:41 PM

2"x4" walls is the proper way to frame your walls. As noted above, that way you can be sure they're straight and square. That's a big necessity for your drop ceiling! Also if you decide to go with paneling, put a layer of 1/4" sheetrock up first to give solid backing.


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