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Old 08-09-2010, 08:59 AM   #1
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Am I load-bearing?


Hi Everyone:

I am working on my home and have a question regarding the likelihood that a wall is load-bearing. From what I have researched online, I am somewhat confident that the answer in this case is NO, however I want to do a quick sanity check before making a costly mistake.

You can see the floor plan below, which shows the second-floor of my 1915 rowhouse. Red indicates the direction (not spacing) of the floor and ceiling joists. I am totally confident in this, having gutted the rooms recently. The thick blue lines indicate the direction of main beams that I can see in both the basement and attic. The blue squares indicate posts in the basement. I am not 100% confident on the exact placement but the direction is certain.

So, the question is, is the green wall load bearing? it already has a large opening in it, but I have recently salvaged some very nice old oak doors that I would to install as oversize pocket doors when changing the layout. The current wall is 2x4s, but the thickness of the doors (2 1/4") will demand a 2x6 wall to accommodate. I am trying to determine the best way to do this and how much bracing (or ideally lack thereof) I need to plan for.


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Old 08-09-2010, 10:33 AM   #2
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Your good to go. It is not load bearing...

Here's a link on how to install pocket doors: http://www.google.ca/#q=pocket+door+...a8f90fc8d23ed3

Hope this helps...

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Last edited by epson; 08-09-2010 at 10:41 AM.
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:44 PM   #3
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Epson is right,partition,not load bearing.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:28 PM   #4
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It appears that, underneath your green line, there is an opening in that wall, one third as wide as the wall is long. If that is correct, that 4 foot or 5 foot wall attached to the exterior wall is keeping everything in check from wind and seismic forces. This short wall is giving resistance at that point in the big exterior wall from bowing in or out. As you rebuild that you may want to add plywood to one or both sides of the short wall and additional nails in the bottom plate to help resist the forces there.

Be safe, Gary
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:41 PM   #5
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Thanks, everyone for your responses. I'm feeling much better at the prospect of changing this wall without bracing it.

GBR -- thanks for the additional points. I'm fairly comfortable regarding wind since I am in an urban area and protected on both sides by other homes separated only by a narrow alley, and not in an area of seismic activity (at least not in the last several thousand years) but these seem to be simple precautions that I can take with materials on hand.

Thanks again!
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