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-   -   1/4 or 1/2 backerboard (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/1-4-1-2-backerboard-17552/)

GLASSMAN1 02-24-2008 11:25 AM

1/4 or 1/2 backerboard
 
feeling stupidier every day ha.i have 3/8 sheet rock in my hose.im redoing bathroom shower.i framed ,shimmed around shower pan so that everything would be flush on surrounding wall for 1/4 inch backerboard.now i found out you cant use that on walls.what could happen if i used 1/4 inch backerboard and do you think it would be ok to use it on one wall only that joins into existing 3/8 sheetrock and 1/2 inch on the rest.were wanting 3/8 tile.should i start over.thanks

End Grain 02-24-2008 11:29 AM

Backerboard is important for tiling a shower. Moisture-resistance, strength, tile weight, thinset adhesion, etc. But, if you have a pre-fabricated self-sealing shower enclosure, it can be affixed directly onto the studs with no actual drywall, backerboard, etc. as per the manufacturers' okey-dokey.

USP45 02-24-2008 11:33 AM

First off installing tiles over sheet rock especially in a moisture rich environment such as a shower is probably one of the biggest no-no's ever. The tiles will peel off. The framing for the shower should be the same size as the pan (Assuming it is a fiberglass pan) then you install Durock (cementiciouse board) so it comes down over the lip keeping it about 1/2" off the pan so as not to let the Durock be immersed in water if it should leak. Tile walls allowing tile to come down to pan. You really have no way to fasten anything 1/4" and expect it to stay more than a few years.

End Grain 02-24-2008 11:38 AM

GLASSMAN1, I misunderstood your reference to backerboard as cement board is commonly called that - perhaps erroneously - out here in AZ. Mea culpa. USP45 is 100% correct in the recommendation for the actual material you should ask for and use. And, his reasons are right on the money. Moisture-resistant drywall is called greensheet or greenboard out here.

GLASSMAN1 02-24-2008 12:01 PM

i have framed the studs so that they are flush with the inside lip of shower pan,also i have put studs were im going to screw the shower door to.the sheetrock is only on one side and its way above were any water is going to hit.the rest is being redone all the way to the ceiling.have you heard of anybody useing 1/4 inch backerboard around showers and was it strong enough to hold the tile?

jerryh3 02-24-2008 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GLASSMAN1 (Post 101130)
i have framed the studs so that they are flush with the inside lip of shower pan,also i have put studs were im going to screw the shower door to.the sheetrock is only on one side and its way above were any water is going to hit.the rest is being redone all the way to the ceiling.have you heard of anybody useing 1/4 inch backerboard around showers and was it strong enough to hold the tile?

1/4" will not be strong enough for wall tile. You'll need to use 1/2". What kind of backerboard are you going to use?

AtlanticWBConst. 02-24-2008 02:51 PM

Use 1/2" Cement board in your shower wall area.

Tear the shims out. That way, the difference will only be 1/8".

Make that up, by having the tile sit over the cement board just slightly, (where it meets the 3/8 S/R). Grout the 1/8" gap.

GLASSMAN1 02-24-2008 04:20 PM

im useing hardi backer board.thanks for information.i geuss we learn as we go .

Galileo007 08-11-2014 11:58 AM

1/2" hardie isn't 1/2"
 
Here's the deal. 1/2" hardie backer isn't really 1/2". It is 7/16". The reason they make it 7/16" is so that the thin layer of mortar holding the tiles will be hidden by the drywall edge that butts up against it. In your case, the difference will be only 1/16" and is easily groutable, or you can just silicone that edge for an even better seal as grout is semi-permeable to water (not that it really matters on a vertical edge).

I don't see why you can't put 1/4" hardie on the wall, then screws (counter-sunk well!), then a thin layer of mortar for bonding, another sheet of 1/4", and more screws. Be advised though, that 1/4" hardie is actually slightly more than 1/4". I believe this is because tumbled edges of tile shouldn't sink below an adjoining surface edge so it's slightly more than 1/4"... if that makes sense. :yes::no:

Also, when you silicon, use painter's tape and mineral spirits to get a nice caulk line.

My two cents, cheers!

Bud Cline 08-11-2014 10:41 PM

This is going to be "one-screwed-up-shower" my friend. What a train wreck this is going to be!

Bud Cline 08-11-2014 11:22 PM

Just noticed this thread is six years old. Suckered again!

Galileo007 pat attention will ya!!!:laughing:

ddawg16 08-12-2014 12:45 AM

For the record....Hardibacker says you 'can' use 1/4" board for showers. But I think everyone agrees 1/2" is better.

My downstairs shower has 1/4" hardibacker....but I also have my studs a lot closer than 16" OC. No issues. Nice and straight.

Bud Cline 08-12-2014 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1388668)
For the record....Hardibacker says you 'can' use 1/4" board for showers. But I think everyone agrees 1/2" is better.

FOR THE RECORD...
Show me a link to that information please, so I can read it for myself. I know of no 1/4" tile backer suitable for wall use. Let's get to the bottom of this before someone suffers damages from some dubious information. If I am in error I will be happy to stand-corrected.

ddawg16 08-13-2014 12:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 1389018)
FOR THE RECORD...
Show me a link to that information please, so I can read it for myself. I know of no 1/4" tile backer suitable for wall use. Let's get to the bottom of this before someone suffers damages from some dubious information. If I am in error I will be happy to stand-corrected.

For the record.

http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner...iebacker.shtml

Quote:

Yes, HardieBacker 1/4'' cement board may be used in a shower. However, we recommend HardieBacker 500 if you need to make a smooth transition to drywall. The board must be mechanically fastened every 8'' on center to the wood or metal studs spaced a maximum of 16'' on center. A vapor barrier is needed if required by local building codes.

Galileo007 08-13-2014 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 1388641)
Just noticed this thread is six years old. Suckered again!

Galileo007 pat attention will ya!!!:laughing:


LOL... There is nothing wrong with being right 6 years later. I found the thread while researching an install and so will someone else 6 years from now. :thumbsup:


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