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Trucon01 02-02-2014 07:44 PM

Wood type for small built-in
 
Hi All,

I have an opening which is about 18x48 and wanted to build some small shelves.

I havn't decided on how I will finish (stain vs paint), but I'm looking for the type of wood for either.

I was thinking maybe a 1/2 pine if I paint and maybe a cherry / walnut if I stain. Thoughts / suggestions?

Thanks

SawDusty 02-04-2014 10:32 AM

Are you planning on some built-in shelves? How deep is the opening?

I just finished a house where the (HVAC) whole-house return took up the bottom half of a chase. The space would have been a linen closet if the return was placed elsewhere. I added shelves, framed and cased the opening and built a frame and panel door to make it a "closet". The opening was about the same as yours. Since the rest of the doors and woodwork in that hallway were painted, I did the same.

For wood type, select white pine or poplar paints up very nicely.

Trucon01 02-04-2014 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SawDusty (Post 1301542)
Are you planning on some built-in shelves? How deep is the opening?

I just finished a house where the (HVAC) whole-house return took up the bottom half of a chase. The space would have been a linen closet if the return was placed elsewhere. I added shelves, framed and cased the opening and built a frame and panel door to make it a "closet". The opening was about the same as yours. Since the rest of the doors and woodwork in that hallway were painted, I did the same.

For wood type, select white pine or poplar paints up very nicely.

Its about 14 inches deep. I was also reading that MDF or sanding down plywood would be an option too.

Thoughts about those?

oh'mike 02-04-2014 11:12 AM

Cabinet grade plywood with edge banding or a decorative solid wood edge is the most frequently use product for shelving and cabinet work.

Solid wood is great to work with---but the cost will surprise you---If you want real solid wood,find a hardwood lumber store---what is available at the Home Depot is over priced and very limited---

SawDusty 02-04-2014 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1301549)
Cabinet grade plywood with edge banding or a decorative solid wood edge is the most frequently use product for shelving and cabinet work.

Solid wood is great to work with---but the cost will surprise you---If you want real solid wood,find a hardwood lumber store---what is available at the Home Depot is over priced and very limited---

I agree with the comment about hardwood. If you plan to paint the work, I'd go with the alternatives; plywood (with a solid wood edge), MDF, or select white pine. I generally aviod anything expensive if I am going to paint a project.

If you want to use plywood, Home Depot sells a Sandeply that finishes up nicely. Strips of pine would make a good looking lip or band. If there will be any end grain showing, you can smooth it up with sandpaper and then wood filler before you paint. You can sand this plywood but keep in mind that the skin if about 1/64" thick and easy to sand right through. I'd hand sand with 180 grit.

If you use MDF, it does not hold fasteners very well. There are specialty screws for MDF... and do pre-drill holes for the screws. This stuff takes paint and looks good.

Maybe you could post a photo when you get the job done. I'd love to see how it turns out.

Trucon01 02-04-2014 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SawDusty (Post 1301556)
I agree with the comment about hardwood. If you plan to paint the work, I'd go with the alternatives; plywood (with a solid wood edge), MDF, or select white pine. I generally aviod anything expensive if I am going to paint a project.

If you want to use plywood, Home Depot sells a Sandeply that finishes up nicely. Strips of pine would make a good looking lip or band. If there will be any end grain showing, you can smooth it up with sandpaper and then wood filler before you paint. You can sand this plywood but keep in mind that the skin if about 1/64" thick and easy to sand right through. I'd hand sand with 180 grit.

If you use MDF, it does not hold fasteners very well. There are specialty screws for MDF... and do pre-drill holes for the screws. This stuff takes paint and looks good.

Maybe you could post a photo when you get the job done. I'd love to see how it turns out.

I certainly will. Thank you for all your help guys. Would this be OK to use as well?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Project-P...4153/203504316

*EDIT*
I assume I can use a 16/18ga finish/brad nailer for this project, if I go with the plywood?

SawDusty 02-04-2014 12:08 PM

Short answer: yes.

Your link took me to birch plywood. I've used Home Depot's birch ply to make some bookshelves. The material worked and finished very nicely... but then is it furniture-grade. Cut carefully as you can get some tearout. You probably already know this, but as a reminder... if you cut with a circular saw, the good face should be down; on a table saw, the good face should be up. You can use a stain and clear-coat finish on this stuff.

Trucon01 02-04-2014 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SawDusty (Post 1301564)
Short answer: yes.

Your link took me to birch plywood. I've used Home Depot's birch ply to make some bookshelves. The material worked and finished very nicely... but then is it furniture-grade. Cut carefully as you can get some tearout. You probably already know this, but as a reminder... if you cut with a circular saw, the good face should be down; on a table saw, the good face should be up. You can use a stain and clear-coat finish on this stuff.

Very cool!! Maybe I'll buy an extra piece and stain and clear coat just to see how it looks before I make up my mind.

Thanks again all!

Not to p!mp my thread, but I will be posting the pictures of this project in my basement thread from my signature.

Colbyt 02-04-2014 03:08 PM

I second the birch. I would use 3/4" and not the half.

I actually did a built in a rock wall facade in our kitchen for cook books. Initially I chose birch to paint because the builder told me the mason was a messy rascal. He wasn't so I got to stain them instead. The birch takes stain well and of course there is always paint.

SawDusty 02-04-2014 03:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Colbyt (Post 1301618)
I second the birch. I would use 3/4" and not the half.

I actually did a built in a rock wall facade in our kitchen for cook books. Initially I chose birch to paint because the builder told me the mason was a messy rascal. He wasn't so I got to stain them instead. The birch takes stain well and of course there is always paint.

I'm not sure 3/4" is required for strength on a shelf that's only 14" X 18"... but It's a good idea for aesthetics. A thicker shelf will just plain look better.

Here's a place you can go to calculate what thickness really is required. The web page http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator.htm has a calculator for sag based on shelf size and load weight.

Trucon01 02-05-2014 09:01 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Here she is. Now just deciding whether to paint it white or stain it with the dark red (on right)...

packer_rich 02-05-2014 09:08 PM

Don't forget your level on the column

Trucon01 02-06-2014 08:34 AM

:) I'm not ready to drywall yet, but thanks for noticing!

If I decide to stain the wood and do not like it, can I go over it with some Zinsser BIN and then go over with any type of paint?

SawDusty 02-06-2014 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trucon01 (Post 1302358)
:) I'm not ready to drywall yet, but thanks for noticing!

If I decide to stain the wood and do not like it, can I go over it with some Zinsser BIN and then go over with any type of paint?

I do like that stain on the right. Yes, if you try stain and then change to paint, you can cover the stain with BIN or Kilz. If you test the stain and it seems splotchy, it could be the wood. Softwoods and some hardwoods, like cherry, can be difficult, but you can use a sealer / stain control first and then apply the stain. Sometimes a gel stain works better on difficult wood. I generally prefer stain but you do have to experiment a bit with some samples of the chosen wood to get the look you want.

Trucon01 02-06-2014 11:04 AM

Awesome. I think I will stain the whole thing tonight and see how it goes. One other thing, lets say I stain and then put a few coats of poly on, do I need to sand off the poly before BIN or can I go over that too?


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