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-   -   Wood rot repair epoxy recs? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/wood-rot-repair-epoxy-recs-158164/)

Oh-Fudge 09-27-2012 01:15 PM

Wood rot repair epoxy recs?
 
Hi, looking for experienced advice for wood rot repair products. I've read that Albatron is the best, but it is $$$$ and you can't buy it at the local store. I am wondering if the stuff at HD/Lowes is adequate for a standard exterior window sill job? Will need hardener then putty. Any suggestions of the best brand that you can get locally?

And, what do you think of Smith's CPES that comes in Warm and Cold weather formulas? Is it a novelty, or do the different formulas make a difference? Thanks everyone :)

user1007 09-27-2012 05:03 PM

I used Abatron products for ages on sailboats and antique home restorations. It may be pricey but it great to work with. I would never use anything else. They ship overnight if you are really in a hurry. Make sure to mix in small batches so you don't waste it.

If you do buy box store stuff, do make sure you double check expiration dates in case the minimum wage apron people did not rotate out outdated materials. There is nothing worse than epoxy that will never cure.

hand drive 09-27-2012 09:27 PM

Bondo

joecaption 09-27-2012 10:56 PM

West system
http://www.westsystem.com/ss/assets/...estoration.pdf

user1007 09-28-2012 06:01 AM

If you try Bondo do get the wood filler, and not the autobody material. The latter will not shrink and expand with the wood and you will end up with a mess. Also note that you will still need a wood hardener.

Matching wood hardeners are usually part of systems like West's, Abatron's and ConServ Epoxy's (another decent company if you need it for comparison). I am not sure it matters but Bondo does not yet make a hardener as far as I know (and I could be wrong. 3M does not see to put out a lot of information on the wood filler).

I have never used West's system on homes but have on boats ages ago. I hadn't thought about it until Joe posted. I certainly had no problems with it and suspect it would work just fine. Again, make sure you get products with the flexibility to work on wood and not just on something like fiberglass hull repairs. West's product list is a little daunting but I suspect they must package some sort of home restoration kit to narrow choices. If not, customer support is worth a shot. I know others who have used the ConServ Epoxy products and were pleased.

As you can see, none of the good products are exactly inexpensive which makes me leary of box store offerings. Selling cheap paint is bad enough but cheap epoxy could be really scary. I do admit a bias against box stores but realize most products are on the shelves for their profit margin potential and not necessarily for their quality. Sad but true.

zircon 09-28-2012 09:16 AM

I have had decent results with various repairs using epoxy left over from fiberglass boat repairs. For a wood repair I have mixed sawdust with the epoxy. For masonry repairs, I have mixed stone dust with the epoxy. A gallon of resin is pretty cheap compared with these proprietary products.

Oh-Fudge 09-28-2012 09:48 AM

Hey Thanks everyone for the responses! I've used autobody Bondo before for wood fascia repairs. I just recently replaced those fascia boards because the Bondo fell out after about 5 years. I've also used the West System on boat repairs, but I found it rather pricey as well. I was hoping the big-box store stuff would be adequate, but all they had at HD was Elmers Glue stuff, of which I seriously doubt the quality as a wood hardener. I guess you get what you pay for? Hmmm, sounds familiar. I suppose I'll cough up the $$$ and order the Albatron so I don't have to do this again in 5 years :huh:

Anybody ever try the Smith's CPES stuff? I was wondering about the "cold formula" since it will be getting cold soon.

joecaption 09-28-2012 09:56 AM

If you want to not do it again then have a new sill made up and remove the whole window and replace the sill.
Have you looked really close that the nosing on the sill to see if you can see two wooden plugs that cover up two or three screws that are removable to replace just the exposed outside sill?
I've seen lots of 100 plus year old house with the window frames built that way.
May have to sand off some of the paint to find them.

Oh-Fudge 10-02-2012 12:23 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Here are some pics if anyone is still reading this post. It is a bay window, so I can't just slide in a new sill. The rotted part is custom formed so I will have to mold some epoxy to it. I'm looking for a putty type of epoxy rather than a liquid. The yellow stuff is a failed repair attempt with "foam in a can" stuff.

So Joe, are you saying that an epoxy repair won't last 5 years? :(

user1007 10-02-2012 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oh-Fudge (Post 1021999)
Here are some pics if anyone is still reading this post. It is a bay window, so I can't just slide in a new sill. The rotted part is custom formed so I will have to mold some epoxy to it. I'm looking for a putty type of epoxy rather than a liquid. The yellow stuff is a failed repair attempt with "foam in a can" stuff.

So Joe, are you saying that an epoxy repair won't last 5 years? :(

Not to worry about Joe's comment. A nice careful epoxy repair will outlast the wood. I have put them in place on sailboats 30-40 years ago that still take a beating racing most weekends.

The restoration processes I mentioned are all two step though. You carve out any rotted wood you can and then use a liquid epoxy to harden any of the fibers left around your cavity. If you do not do this step you just have mushy fibers that no paste will work with.

The second step is to mix and fill with the epoxy paste. You can tint it if you want. Work in small batches (or it will cure on you faster than you can work), let them cure and build up all missing voids until you get a surface. You can cut a profile from masonite or similar material to match that you have as you sculpt the final layers. You can work the epoxy with standard woodworking tools.

When I say epoxy, I am talking about good two part stuff and not something like single can bondo.

I would pull that window out and out of your way. It looks like it is screaming to be reglazed anyhow.

All this said, have you traced how so much water is reaching the sill that it rots? Are you missing flashing or a gutter above this window?

Oh-Fudge 10-02-2012 03:04 PM

Thanks SD, I'm a sailor, too. There's a substantial overhang over that window, and it's on the leeward side of the (waterfront) house, so I don't know how it gets much water. It had signs of decay when I moved in ten years ago and I just kept putting it off.

Funny you should mention those windows. I just replaced two of those panels 3 weeks ago and haven't touched up the moulding yet. One of the double panes was cracked on each one. Maybe I shoulda done the wood first, but getting the windows in before winter was the top priority. Maybe I'll go with the West System since there's a West Marine on every streetcorner here, it'll save me on shipping costs :thumbup:.

user1007 10-02-2012 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oh-Fudge (Post 1022115)
Maybe I'll go with the West System since there's a West Marine on every streetcorner here, it'll save me on shipping costs :thumbup:.

Like I say, I have not used their stuff in years but would have no hesitation. Looking over their site there are wonderful options for epoxies and catalysts.

My fave racing sailboat was a sloop rigged 35' Cheoy Lee Lion. She was extremely heavy in the keel but with a tall mast it almost seemed like you could tip her over with mast and keel near parallel to the water. Blow a puff of air behind her and she just flew. We got caught in the SF Bay in the storm of the century with winds we later learned clocked at 90mph. At sea we could have just ridden it out but the average depth of SF Bay is 10 feet and with 6.5 feet of keel under us we would have been torn to shreds if we left one of the carved and dredge shipping channels. All the stupid tack drills paid off because that is all we did for hours. Tack and tack and then tack again as sail clips tore from the mainsail. She got us home and always did. When I got my pilots license I was allowed to sail her alone, usually to the sail shop across the Bay from Bezerkley where she parked for free in front of a restaurant window because she was gorgeous looking.

A bad turn at a marker and a spinaker pole gone wild as it dropped with sail still attached took out some antique teak railing. I repaired it with epoxy and none but a couple of us would have noticed the patch. Heard she suffered a major fire and I don't dare ask if she was ever restored.

Fair winds, eye on the tell tail and clear to the horizon with the Spinnaker blocking part of your view lad! Do report back on how it all works out.

DoyleSumrall 10-04-2012 11:10 AM

Personally I had good results with various repairs using epoxy left over from fiberglass boat repairs. For a wood repair I have mixed sawdust with the epoxy. For masonry repairs, I have mixed stone dust with the epoxy. A gallon of resin is pretty cheap compared with these proprietary products.

funfool 10-05-2012 11:23 PM

I have had good luck with this stuff, is cheap, available at local big box stores.
Just mix up the amount you need.
A word of caution, try to apply as smooth and finished as possible.
You can apply it and let it setup for about 30 min and can start sanding and smoothing it out.
If you apply it and let it sit overnight to dry, will need a orbital sander with 100 grit paper to smooth it out, it does dry rock hard.
So smoother you get it while applying, less work for you later.

I have used it inside and exterior uses for years and find it a good cheap product,

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tony.g 10-06-2012 03:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1018596)
the minimum wage apron people

......:laughing::laughing:


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