Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-13-2012, 06:12 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Share |
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I am getting ready to tackle an advanced (for me) carpentry project which will involve two built in bookcases on either side of a window with a window seat in between.

How do I handle the low height of the window which is only 17.5" from the floor to the top of the sill?

I guess I am trying to figure out how to handle the existing stool and apron.

I assume my options are to remove the existing stool and apron and then create the window seat top that flows into the window, kind of like a combo window seat/window stool I guess. Or cut off the apron to about a 1/2 inch underneath the stool and have the top of the window seat at about 16 inches, which seems kind of low to me..... And if I did this the window seat cushion would not sit flush with the wall because of the protruding stool, and I don't want to make the height of the seat even shorter to accommodate the 2 or 3 inch height of the seat cushion so it would slide underneath the reduced apron height, so i'm not sure which way to go here. I'm thinking the first option.

Thanks for any suggestions.
Attached Thumbnails
Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.-photo-1-1-.jpg   Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.-photo-2-1-.jpg  


Last edited by noone; 02-13-2012 at 06:17 PM.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 06:56 PM   #2
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,249
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I agree----loose the 'stool' and make that the bench height----

Do you have a table saw? That will help a lot on this project----Mike----

__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 07:07 PM   #3
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,654
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


im with mike on this. loose the stool and apron. just be ready to have to clip some finish nails . some finish carpenters will nail down through the stool into the apron to lock things together better. makes for a stronger assembly


heres another question though. how big is the window and how high off the ground is it on the outside. reason being... the risk of a small child falling out of the windowa
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 07:17 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Glad you guys agree. The only downside is that I will have to remove the seat cushion to open up the shutters, but that's not that big of a deal, and a small price to pay for a better seat height.

This is the first floor so it's just ground outside that window 17.5 inches down. Perfectly safe.

I have a table saw, Craftsman, so ok, but definitely not the best. I also have a router, band saw, and a Dewalt 12" compound miter saw (not sliding), and of course the Bostitch finish brad nailer.

I was thinking about possibly having Home Depot make the cuts for the sides, backs and shelves off the 3/4 ply (3/8 for the back) for these built-ins. Seems like it would be easier than me having to do it, since they could cut a side, and then trace that side off, and then make another cut exactly the same, etc. I figured if I supervised them correctly, this could be a real option. Thoughts?

Last edited by noone; 02-13-2012 at 07:34 PM.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to noone For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (02-14-2012)
Old 02-13-2012, 08:29 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Southern Minnesota
Posts: 112
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I would be cautious about letting Home Depot make your pieces. Mainly, how sharp is their panel saw blade. Ripping the pieces won't be the problem. Cross-cutting the plywood can produce horrible splinters. Make sure the back side is facing forward and I would like to see you use masking tape where the cut will be. They may not like you taking the time to mask the cuts, but it will give you much smoother cross-cuts.

About the window seat, I agree with the others: replace the stool. One thing, though...when you make the notch in the back to take out the area of the wall thickness on the left and right side of the window, leave about 1/4" for scribing along the wall. If you do a good job of scribing you won't need trim around the edges. Just a suggestion and may not be worth it to you.
MNsawyergp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 08:55 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Great suggestions.

Sounds like I should maybe have Home Depot do the rips and I can do the cross cuts. This would at least make it easier to get in and out of the suv. It's a full size but I'd rather minimize the scraping up of the inside of it.

Here are my other questions for now-

1. If I were to use trim where the seat hits the wall, what kind would you use? Cove?
2. What type of blade should I use on my tablesaw? This saw was given to me so I don't know how to tell how old the blade is. I think I'd just assume by a new one.

Thanks again.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 09:35 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,798
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Since you going to have a seat coushon covering up the back side just use latex caulking.
For the cuts along the wall I would make them at a slight angle. That way just the tip would be making contact and it would not be as likly to hold you off the wall.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
noone (02-16-2012)
Old 02-13-2012, 09:43 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Good point.

What kind of wood stock would you use for the stool/seat? I'm not interested in any flip up storage or anything. It will be a fixed hollow and empty seat. What's a good seat depth? I'm thinking 14" deep shelves, 16 or 17" deep seat? Maybe I could bullnose route on the front of the seat with a little bit of cove underneath? The front of the seat I plan on doing the standard recessed panel wainscoting.

**edit**. I guess I can trim it out however I feel fit. That's the fun part of this whole project. I can do it however I want!!

Last edited by noone; 02-13-2012 at 09:48 PM.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 09:48 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,798
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I would use 3/4" cabinet grade plywood and bull nosed molding on the front. Trying to route a profile on plywood is just going to tare it up and leave end grain exposed.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 09:57 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I thought that was an option too. Thanks for confirming. More questions to come as the project progresses. It will be a few weeks before the project starts.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 10:03 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,798
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I also would use biskits between the bull nose and the plywood, Tite Bond II glue and at least 2" long finish nails.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
noone (02-16-2012)
Old 02-13-2012, 10:07 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Southern Minnesota
Posts: 112
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


I would use colonial door stop around the edges or ranch door stop, which ever fits the theme of the rest of the room or house. Cross-cutting long plywood on a table saw sucks! I would get a 40 carbide blade. I would still tape Both sides of the cut...a table saw tends to blow out the back side when cross-cutting.

Do you have a good circular saw? If you do, you could make a fence jig that clamps to the plywood and your saw rides on it to make your cross-cuts. I make mine out of 2 layers of 1/4" plywood, The bottom layer about 12", the 2nd about 6". Glue the 2 layers together flushing one edge. Make sure that the edge of the 2nd layer that runs down the center is arrow straight, preferably a factory edge, but they aren't always straight. You can glue these by putting weight on them to press them together on the floor. Once they are dry, run you circle saw with the bed on the 1st layer and the edge against the straight edge down the middle. The saw will cut a portion of the 1st layer off, but that will be your reference edge for all future cuts. You will be able to line up this edge to a cut line, clamp on the jig, clamping to the 2 layered edge and run you saw along the jig. I have a jig at 3' and 5' for cross-cuts and 8' for rips. I make a sawing table out of 4 saw horses and a sheet of plywood. I put a sheet of 1" styrofoam on that, then the plywood I am cutting on that. I set the saw blade to cut through my plywood piece and into the styrofoam about 1/4". I have built complete kitchens and entertainment centers and library cabinets on sight with this set up. I use vise grip C-clamps to clamp the jig to the plywood. I use a DeWalt-384 8" circular saw. The 364K will work also. It is a 7" saw. I like this saw because you can adjust the bed edge to be parallel to the blade. This is super important for preventing chipping on any saw. This set up saves your back because you don't have to man handle sheets of plywood. You just move the saw.
MNsawyergp is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to MNsawyergp For This Useful Post:
noone (02-16-2012)
Old 02-13-2012, 10:20 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Wow. Excellent tips. Thanks for sharing!
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2012, 10:43 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Anything wrong with the Dewalt 368K? It's 3lbs lighter than the 364K.
noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2012, 02:47 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 501
Default

Window seat between two built-ins under low window questions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MNsawyergp View Post
I would use colonial door stop around the edges or ranch door stop, which ever fits the theme of the rest of the room or house. Cross-cutting long plywood on a table saw sucks! I would get a 40 carbide blade. I would still tape Both sides of the cut...a table saw tends to blow out the back side when cross-cutting.

Do you have a good circular saw? If you do, you could make a fence jig that clamps to the plywood and your saw rides on it to make your cross-cuts. I make mine out of 2 layers of 1/4" plywood, The bottom layer about 12", the 2nd about 6". Glue the 2 layers together flushing one edge. Make sure that the edge of the 2nd layer that runs down the center is arrow straight, preferably a factory edge, but they aren't always straight. You can glue these by putting weight on them to press them together on the floor. Once they are dry, run you circle saw with the bed on the 1st layer and the edge against the straight edge down the middle. The saw will cut a portion of the 1st layer off, but that will be your reference edge for all future cuts. You will be able to line up this edge to a cut line, clamp on the jig, clamping to the 2 layered edge and run you saw along the jig. I have a jig at 3' and 5' for cross-cuts and 8' for rips. I make a sawing table out of 4 saw horses and a sheet of plywood. I put a sheet of 1" styrofoam on that, then the plywood I am cutting on that. I set the saw blade to cut through my plywood piece and into the styrofoam about 1/4". I have built complete kitchens and entertainment centers and library cabinets on sight with this set up. I use vise grip C-clamps to clamp the jig to the plywood. I use a DeWalt-384 8" circular saw. The 364K will work also. It is a 7" saw. I like this saw because you can adjust the bed edge to be parallel to the blade. This is super important for preventing chipping on any saw. This set up saves your back because you don't have to man handle sheets of plywood. You just move the saw.
Where did you buy your 1" sheet of styrofoam?? Any disadvantages to just laying your 3/4 on some 2 x 4's resting on the 1/4 ply table?

noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Adding storage to window seat apruden Carpentry 2 11-06-2009 04:54 PM
Problem with window and everything around it malfunction Building & Construction 3 05-26-2009 05:11 PM
Replace old window with smaller window Suncrest79 Building & Construction 3 04-15-2009 08:39 PM
Installing window questions bakerhouse Remodeling 4 05-18-2008 01:22 PM
Egress Window Questions? cibula11 Building & Construction 12 03-15-2007 12:24 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.