Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-23-2009, 01:14 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Share |
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Thank you so much.....i really appreciate your patience with a rokkie here....

actually the doors are already installed. They are pine prehung doors. Menard's had a great deal on them and they have a standard 4-9/16 in. jamb on them. They were installed on two bedrooms and a bathroom. The insides of those rooms are completely finsihed and the doors were installed so that the jambs were flush with the finish walls in those rooms. But outside of those rooms is where I will need the extensions. The finish walls on the outside of the rooms will be 3/4 inch tongue and groove pine so I basically need extenions that are 3/8 inch think around the whole door. That seems really thin for an extension. Is that fairly normal? Also for the door extensions there should be no reveal, correct? Those should be totally flush with the existing door jamb? Do you just plane any inconsistencies on the inside surface where the extension meets the existing jamb?

Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 01:43 PM   #17
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


If they are pre-hung doors your best bet is to make the slip part of the jamb out of stock that is wide enough for the intended application cut the tongue (for this application it is technically just a rabbit cut) and slide the frame into the existing groove of the other part of the jamb.

If you have already installed both pieces of the jamb then yes you could glue and clamp the 3/8" scabs to the existing jamb. if you do this make sure you let the scabs hang over slightly (1/32" to 1/16" max) on the finished side of the casing. Then after the glue dries you can run a router around the jamb with a flushing bit. Finish flushing the corners and the last few inches at the bottom with a cranked-neck chisel or scraper and lightly sand the casing. If you don't have a router you can hand plane the edges.
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 01:50 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


dang...this is like going to school......

yes the door jambs are already totally installed so i will need to follow your second option......i have a router and flush trim bit but it's a pretty big router...2.25 HP.......might get a little awkward trying to handle that.......i am wondering if it may serve me better to get a palm router or laminate router with a flush trim bit to do that.........

thanks once again......you have made something that seemed so complex to me previously seem like it would be, while not easy, something i can reasonably tackle on my own.
Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 02:05 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom5151 View Post
dang...this is like going to school......

yes the door jambs are already totally installed so i will need to follow your second option......i have a router and flush trim bit but it's a pretty big router...2.25 HP.......might get a little awkward trying to handle that.......i am wondering if it may serve me better to get a palm router or laminate router with a flush trim bit to do that.........

thanks once again......you have made something that seemed so complex to me previously seem like it would be, while not easy, something i can reasonably tackle on my own.

If I route everything but the corners and the bottom couple of inches, would a powered hand plane get me up all the way up into those corners and to the bottom of the jambs? I don't have a powered hand planer but the ones i have looked at don't look like they would get all the way up into the corner...the guides on the seem to stick out about 2 inches in front of the blade which wouod not allow getting in corners etc. ..............I have something called a "bullnose plane" I think. That has the blade riding out at the leading edge of the plane...that may work.....
Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 03:50 PM   #20
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


No, don't waste your money on a power planer. The router will get you much closer to the edges then the power planer. Most people end up butchering the work piece with the hand held power planers. The power planers work more like a hand held joiner than a plane. A bullnose hand planer will get you pretty close but you will still have to finish with a chisel. There are rabbiting planes available that will take you all the way to the edge and into the corner.

You should be OK with your router depending on the base. If the base is really large and you can't modify it then you could try a laminate router or picking up a smaller router. I have several routers that vary from 1.75 hp to 3.25 hp and typically use 1.75 & 2.25 hp routers in the field and have performed similar tasks with them. The laminate trimmer may be a good option for you. Repeated use will probably burn out the motor but it may hold up OK for what you are doing. They are relatively inexpensive so you probably wouldn't be out much if you did burn it up. Make sure your bit is sharp and don't be surprised if it stalls out or bogs down some.
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 03:59 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Quote:
Originally Posted by ARI001 View Post
No, don't waste your money on a power planer. The router will get you much closer to the edges then the power planer. Most people end up butchering the work piece with the hand held power planers. The power planers work more like a hand held joiner than a plane. A bullnose hand planer will get you pretty close but you will still have to finish with a chisel. There are rabbiting planes available that will take you all the way to the edge and into the corner.

You should be OK with your router depending on the base. If the base is really large and you can't modify it then you could try a laminate router or picking up a smaller router. I have several routers that vary from 1.75 hp to 3.25 hp and typically use 1.75 & 2.25 hp routers in the field and have performed similar tasks with them. The laminate trimmer may be a good option for you. Repeated use will probably burn out the motor but it may hold up OK for what you are doing. They are relatively inexpensive so you probably wouldn't be out much if you did burn it up. Make sure your bit is sharp and don't be surprised if it stalls out or bogs down some.

thank you...i would have wasted money on one of those.....so a rabbeting plane...okay......i have seen them...if that's the right tool to finish the corners and bottom edges then that's what I'll do......thank you.
Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 09:00 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


I probabaly should have asked this question about window jamb extensions earlier but forgot........is it better to have the finish wall material in place before making and installing jamb extensions or can it be done prior to that?

It will probably be a little while yet before we are ready to finish the walls where the windows are. So far we've pulled off all the old drywall and have reinsultaed everything and have plastic stapled to the studs. So we are basically looking at open wall framing right now. My thought was to get ahead of the game a little bit and build the extensions now so we have that out of the way when we are ready to finish the walls.

Intuitively i can see the benefit of having the finish walls in place when you go to build the extensions but is there any reason that you have to wait until then? I have a bunch of scraps of the finish wall material (3/4 inch #2 pine tongue and groove) from the rooms we already finished, so i could use that as a template to build the extensions now before the finish walls go up....

Thoughts?

Thanks.
Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 04:17 PM   #23
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Just make sure you allow for the finish surface when making the extensions. The casing moulding will accommodate for slight variations in the finish surface. Pre-assemble your casings on a bench for better results. It doesn't hurt to reinforce the joints with biscuits or splines either. The finish wall surface would be in place before the finish carpenters started work.
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 04:35 PM   #24
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,406
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


It's always best to have the wall finish up before making your jamb extenders.

Often the window is cocked in the hole. Always take measurements at all four corners.
The jamb extenders often need to be tapered when corner measurements differ.

Slight differences can be cured by"beating in"'the drywall .Crush the offending drywall with a hammer,

Brutal, but standard practice.


Door Jamb extenders are frequently set back1/8 of an inch. The lead edge of the jamb is radius ed.
If you butt your extender flush (without a small reveal ) that radius will leave an ugly seam.

Check measurements in all corners. Good luck!--MIKE
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2009, 07:23 AM   #25
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
It's always best to have the wall finish up before making your jamb extenders.

Often the window is cocked in the hole. Always take measurements at all four corners.
The jamb extenders often need to be tapered when corner measurements differ.


Slight differences can be cured by"beating in"'the drywall .Crush the offending drywall with a hammer,

Brutal, but standard practice.



Door Jamb extenders are frequently set back1/8 of an inch. The lead edge of the jamb is radius ed.
If you butt your extender flush (without a small reveal ) that radius will leave an ugly seam.

Check measurements in all corners. Good luck!--MIKE
I agree but it can and has been done without the finish wall in place.

The OP is pre-assembling the jamb extenders and should be able to shim them equal to the window as he has stated there is a lot of room in the RI opening.

No, not standard practice . Would have gotten you thrown off any job I have ever been on. Regardless OP is using T&G boards as finish wall cover.

See smiley

The OP ic choosing method #2 as he has already installed the jamb and does not want to remove them. Glueing and clamping the scabs to the existing jamb will be fine as long as the OP remembers to match the grain. The same process is commonly used to join boards together in furniture work. The process is known as edge glueing. After planing, scraping, and sanding the there is no visibe seam.

It should go without saying to double check all measurements, hence the saying; measure twice cut once.

To illustrate my point about seams here is a picture of a cherry bench seat I did a while back for somebody. The top is edge glued and dowel reinforced. The faces are cope and sticked. The panels where all edge glued from smaller pieces.
Attached Thumbnails
Window Jamb Extensions-cherry-bench-seat.jpg  
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2009, 09:00 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Quote:
Originally Posted by ARI001 View Post
I agree but it can and has been done without the finish wall in place.

The OP is pre-assembling the jamb extenders and should be able to shim them equal to the window as he has stated there is a lot of room in the RI opening.

No, not standard practice . Would have gotten you thrown off any job I have ever been on. Regardless OP is using T&G boards as finish wall cover.

See smiley

The OP ic choosing method #2 as he has already installed the jamb and does not want to remove them. Glueing and clamping the scabs to the existing jamb will be fine as long as the OP remembers to match the grain. The same process is commonly used to join boards together in furniture work. The process is known as edge glueing. After planing, scraping, and sanding the there is no visibe seam.

It should go without saying to double check all measurements, hence the saying; measure twice cut once.

To illustrate my point about seams here is a picture of a cherry bench seat I did a while back for somebody. The top is edge glued and dowel reinforced. The faces are cope and sticked. The panels where all edge glued from smaller pieces.
May I ask what an OP is?....lol......sorry I am such a rookie.....
Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2009, 09:25 AM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


OP = original poster
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2009, 09:40 AM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 65
Default

Window Jamb Extensions


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
OP = original poster
ah ok........got it.......lol....thank you

Tom5151 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oak casing to a vinyl jamb extension on a new window? Dustball Carpentry 13 04-14-2010 11:06 AM
Problem with window and everything around it malfunction Building & Construction 3 05-26-2009 05:11 PM
Window Jamb question groundtrac Carpentry 7 11-23-2008 08:09 PM
Window jamb helpless handyman Carpentry 11 08-03-2006 12:45 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.