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Old 07-31-2006, 08:59 PM   #1
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Window jamb


I just purchashed an old house and I need to replace most of the windows. On some of the windows, the frames are rotted out, due to lack of maintenance. I need to change the 1 X 6 wood that the window attaches to, before installing the new windows. What wood should I use? Also the 1 X 6 are nailed to the house framing from the outside when the house was built I assume. How can I nail the new boards to the 3/4 tongue and groove exterior walls from the inside since the house now has siding and stucco?
Thanks to all!

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Old 07-31-2006, 09:08 PM   #2
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Pictures would help your post a great deal, so, if there are any possibilities of Pics....

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Old 07-31-2006, 09:20 PM   #3
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Haven't taken any pictures of the windows. What needs to be replaced is the 1 X 6 boards that the window screws onto on the sides. I need to do the whole frame, top, bottom and sides. I was just wondering what type of 1X6 should I get, and the best way to nail them to the existing house. Like I said the ones there are nailed from the outside, and that will be impossible to do since there is siding and stucco. When I pull the old ones out, I know I am going to have nails sticking out, from the outside to the inside. I will cut those nails, don't want them to loosen the stucco up.

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Old 07-31-2006, 09:26 PM   #4
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What kind of windows are these?
Are they double hung? I'm trying to get an image of them....Size?
When you say that the frames are rotted out...Do you mean the sashes? The Jams? The sill?
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Old 07-31-2006, 09:35 PM   #5
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Yes, these are double hung windows. They are going to be replaced with vinyl double hung windows. Okay, let me explain it a little better. The frame, where the windows are screwed on to, as well as the sashes are rotted. I need to make a new frame, take the old one out and replace it. This way I have something to screw my new windows to, and also to nail my trim to once I am done.
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Old 08-01-2006, 09:40 AM   #6
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Sorry that I didn't get back to you sooner, dinner time and all.

Anyhow: What 'wood' should you use?

It also depends on whether you are staining interior side or not.

However:
What I would suggest is to use AZEK board. If you are not familiar with this product, it is white, never needs paint(it can be painted) and is rot-resistant, since it is made from PVC composite material. You can buy it in different 1x widths.

As far as the issue with the stucco, etc. Again, this is hard to understand without a picture. The best I can offer is to very carefully(obviously)... remove the old 1x6 boards away from the stucco areas, cut the nails? etc....

Is the stucco painted?
If so, you can tie in the areas of the new boards and the stucco with a caulking gun and either smooth caulking or 'sanded' caulking (used in bathrooms).

Best I can offer sight/unseen.
If there is anyway you can take pics and post, I think it would help provide very clear answers to your dilemna.
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:20 PM   #7
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Hi, and thanks. I am refering to the frame where you would screw your new vinyl double hung windows to, and nail your finish trim to. Some of the boards are rotted, just one. But I have like 5 windows where these boards have to be replaced since they got crack during the demo. I want to take the old windows out, remove the frame, install new frame and install the new double hungs. This way I will have the straight edge on the outside to nail my window trim once the sheetrock is installed. The frame was orginally nailed from the outside when the house was made, but can no loger be nailed from the outside there is siding back from the days and I do not want to touch that and open a can of worms. I was wondering if you had an idea on how I can nail the new frame from the inside of the house. I was going to make up the frames according to the window size, nail it to the window openning and then install my windows. Hope you can see what I am trying to do. Thanks. I can always use L brackets to install the frame, but I was wondering if I can probably nail the frame in some sort of angle, without the nails comming out of the exterior of the house .
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Old 08-01-2006, 07:28 PM   #8
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Heres a photo, the arrows point to the frame around the window that I need to change. Thanks
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Old 08-02-2006, 06:26 PM   #9
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OK H.H.,

The picture helps a little, Tho I can't see the outside. I am going to assume that the stucco is to the edge of the windows.

By today's standards, a window doesn't have a 'frame' in it. The house walls are framed with an 'opening' for a window. The window opening has sides that are comprised of a king stud and a jack stud. These:

a.) Hold up the window header.
b.) Provide a surface to attach your window jams to.
c.) They provide a 'backer' (behind the sheetrock) to nail your casing to.

1.) First off, You will need to 'custom-mill' the new stock that you will be using to replace the rotted wood stock with. You may already be aware of this: the widths on those old 2x4's is different from the widths of today's standard 2x4 measurements.
2.) You have no choice but to remove the old rotted studs located on the sides and edges of the window opening, as well as the bottom sill to do your repairs and window replacements.
3.) As stated by you, removing these outside studs and bottom sill will most certainly cause damage to the exterior finished product, since, it is attached directly to the rotted wood.
4.) Basically, you have no choice on #3.
5.) Observation: (By your pictures, it looks like you have a small cavity between the area of the window frame and the next stud over. Probably this was the area where the old style window weights were placed)
6.) You should measure out the area on the exterior location of your house side (stucco). Using a pencil, mark that area with a straight edge, that corresponds to the line of your rotted window frame that you will be removing. Do the sides, and bottoms.
7.) Pre-cut that stucco type siding material with a skill saw. Use a good carbide tipped blade, set the depth to correspond to the depth of the stucco + 1/8“.
Carefully cut these lines straight , so that the areas (Attached to the rotted wood) are now separated from the material on the rest of the homes stucco siding. BTW- the blades you use will eventually be destroyed by the material, so don't get too attached to them.
8.) Once this is done, carefully removed these pieces. Remember that the best way to separate pieces of any kind of structure is to cut the fasteners and pry apart. This causes the least amount of damage.
9.) You now have a large opening with rough cut stucco on all sides.
By the looks of it, you will possibly have some exterior material ‘floating’ on the sides of the windows.
10.) Using your newly milled lumber that now matches the width of the old style 2x4 wall framing, build in the window opening to the size you need it to be. (Your required Rough Opening size)
You will start by filling in that space that was an open cavity for the window weights. You will be nailing your stud against the old studs. In affect, you will be ‘sistering’ them.
11.) If you have those narrow strips of exterior areas that are ‘floating’ - on the sides of the window (over the old weight cavity area): You could use some liquid construction adhesive on the sides of the new studs that face the exterior. These would be the new studs that you use to fill in the window opening, and nail in place.
12.) These new ‘sides’ and new bottom sill that you install, will serve as the new frame that you will be screwing your new window jams into.
13.) INTERIOR SIDES: Sheetrock, compound, wood trim work & casing will take care of everything aesthetically.
14.) EXTERIOR SIDES: You will now have a large opening. On the edges of this opening, you will have the newly installed wood studs and sills. Their surfaces facing outward. Before I go into this, I have a question:
15.) QUESTION: Are you going to use ‘replacement’ style window (no flange) or ‘New Construction’ style windows (With flanges)?

16.) If you use Replacement windows, then you will have to install the window header trim piece, finished jams and lower stool sill. Then install your window.
17.) If you use the new construction windows, you will need to install these first and then install all your trim work around it.

18.) Getting back to point 12. - You will be installing new trim-work to go around the windows. This trim work will cover the spaces that were left when you removed the rotted studs and sill.
Previously, the home had a minimal look for the window exterior trim…… because the stucco went right up to the window trim edges. There is no way around this (unless you hire someone to come in and apply and match the same surface material).
You will need to replace this area with exterior grade trim work. In affect, ‘picture-framing’ in the window areas. You would then apply a smooth bead of exterior grade caulking (color matched) between the new wood trim and the old stucco area. This is where you took the skill saw to and cut a straight line.
A suggestion also would be to use AZEK trim work. This is a PVC composite material that is completely rot resistant (I had mentioned it in an earlier post).

19.)Caulk and paint away to tie-in everything.
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 08-02-2006 at 06:30 PM.
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Old 08-02-2006, 07:50 PM   #10
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Okay, I completly understand this now. But the window itself is not screwed onto the studs or king studs. There is a frame made of 3/4inc thick by 5 1/2 inc in width surrounding the entire window(1 X 6). On this frame the window is screwed or nailed onto on the sides, this frame was nailed from the outside of the house when it was built. There is siding, not vinyl on the upper floor exterior of the house, something I do not want to touch, I have enough work on my hands. This frame extends the window about 5/8. On this frame there was molding nailed onto it all around the windows. So you can better understand if you were to unscrew the window, it would not pull out until you remove these moldings. Hope you understand, the 2 X 4's are not rotted, its the frame that was made by the 1 X 6 boards that is. They are orginal windows dating back to maybe the 1940's.. The house is made of tongue and groove exterior boards, hope this helps. Thanks so much.
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Old 08-03-2006, 09:15 AM   #11
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HH,

Quote:
This frame extends the window about 5/8.
- I take it that you are saying that the frame extends outward 5/8" from the flush surface of the house's siding?

Quote:
On this frame there was molding nailed onto it all around the windows. So you can better understand if you were to unscrew the window, it would not pull out until you remove these moldings
.
- Are you saying that you don't want to touch that exterior window trim?
Because, by the sounds of it, you will have no choice but to remove it and possibly re-install or install replacement trim after the new window is installed.

Quote:
Hope you understand, the 2 X 4's are not rotted, its the frame that was made by the 1 X 6 boards that is.
-Yes, I understand that.

Quote:
They are orginal windows dating back to maybe the 1940's.. The house is made of tongue and groove exterior boards, hope this helps. Thanks so much.
- Were you going to replace the rotted frame and re-use the windows or install new windows?



You will still have to remove this rotted frame. One way to loosen it may be to go at it from the outside:

Prep work: Obviously, start by removing the old window from the rotted frame work.

1.) Get a flat pry-bar and separate the rotted framework (1x6) from the exterior sheathing or boards that it is nailed to. Create a space wide enough for a blade. See the next point:
2.)Get a recipricating saw with metal blade into that space you pried open and cut the nails. You may need to get a Long blade to bend it and get it into the space to reach all nails. You should remove one side at a time and then the bottom and top (piece-by-piece). Make sure that you cut and separate the 4 pieces of the frame work from eachother as you remove the frame. That way you are not pulling at the house exterior over a large area and causing alot of stress-damage. Do it piece by piece.
3.) Once you get the rotted frame separated and removed from the house's exterior surface, you can go in and finish cutting off the nail 'stubs' that are left from your cutting.
4.) Go back and see my post about building the opening in with studs to the opening size you need for the kind of window you will be using.
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Old 08-03-2006, 01:45 PM   #12
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I will post you a better close up picture when I get a chance. Thanks. The molding that extends is inside of the house, not on the outside.

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