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hpenda1 02-20-2013 11:00 AM

What size beam do I need?
 
I am tearing down a 24ft load bearing wall. It holds 20-2x12x20 rafters. I plan to put 4- 8x8 hand hewn posts in place of the wall. My question is, do I need a huge beam to support since I have posts and if so, what size beam would I need to put in to support the wall along with the posts? (thickness, width,etc) And should I go with laminate or a natural wood beam? I am after the old barn wood look.
Thanks

JonM 02-20-2013 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hpenda1 (Post 1121024)
I am tearing down a 24ft load bearing wall. It holds 20-2x12x20 rafters. I plan to put 4- 8x8 hand hewn posts in place of the wall. My question is, do I need a huge beam to support since I have posts and if so, what size beam would I need to put in to support the wall along with the posts? (thickness, width,etc) And should I go with laminate or a natural wood beam? I am after the old barn wood look.
Thanks


Go to your local "real" lumber yard and they will size an LVL for you. You may not even need all those posts.

drtbk4ever 02-20-2013 11:47 AM

I personally would want to have a structural engineer look over the situation.

You need help to determine the size of the beam that is needed which is based on spans and loads. AND as importantly, the post supports. It isn't good enough to just put a post up without knowing the support structure under the post. That post needs to be supported all the way to the ground, sometimes with concrete footings.

So pay the money to get the proper help.

And make sure you pull any permits that may be required for your area.

GBrackins 02-22-2013 03:38 PM

not only do you need to know the size of the beam, but also the weight each of the columns is supporting and what is needed to size the footing/foundation for the columns. not much good to have a beam if the columns "sink" because the existing floor/slab/foundation cannot properly support them.

Engineers are always good money spent so you do things right the first time.

Good luck!


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