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-   -   what to do with a stud that crowns... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/what-do-stud-crowns-67620/)

Tonglebeak 03-25-2010 09:47 PM

what to do with a stud that crowns...
 
Title should say it all. Went ot stand my wall up, and realized one of the studs is crowning horribly. I face nailed the top plate. It's a king stud for a door opening. If I face nailed the top half of the stud (that is straight) to the jack stud, will toenailing the bottom of the stud remove the crown?

TheCamper 03-25-2010 09:54 PM

I am not sure I understand the situation properly but if the stud is bowed then I either replace it or cut a slender "V" notch in the stud so that I can straighten it and then face nail another stud to it. If this is a non-bering wall then you can likely nail your jack stud to it and it will perform well without an additional full stud.

Tonglebeak 03-25-2010 10:17 PM

Yes it's non load-bearing. The king stud is what is crowned (bowed, whichever is the correct term for studs. I know crown is used for joists). I may end up just cutting it off and face nailing another part to it like yous aid.

Willie T 04-01-2010 09:32 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Here's the idea. As seen, you can straighten a stud from either the convex or the concave side (edge).

cellophane 04-01-2010 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 422613)
Here's the idea. As seen, you can straighten a stud from either the convex or the concave side.

i have to say - your sketchup drawings rock, especially for those of us that are visual learners =D

Willie T 04-01-2010 11:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cellophane (Post 422616)
i have to say - your sketchup drawings rock, especially for those of us that are visual learners =D

I'm a big believer in the old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words.

johnrem 04-01-2010 01:31 PM

Or, remove the bowed stud completely , and replace with a straight one. Remember to always use your straightest material for door,window,and corner framing.

lanemiller 04-06-2010 01:37 PM

I've never before seen the tactics to getting the bow out of a stud. Those are pretty handy. I normally pull all the bowed studs out and use them for cripples and sills

Cache 04-09-2010 02:39 PM

As a side note, it is really helpful if everyone used the proper terms for the proper defects. It does make a difference whether we are talking about a bow or a crown in a board.

Crown=
If board is standing on the narrow edge and both ends are touching the ground, the center will be lifted off the ground.

Bow=
Same condition as above but happens when the board is laying on the wide face.

Willie T 04-09-2010 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cache (Post 426338)
As a side note, it is really helpful if everyone used the proper terms for the proper defects. It does make a difference whether we are talking about a bow or a crown in a board.

Crown=
If board is standing on the narrow edge and both ends are touching the ground, the center will be lifted off the ground.

Bow=
Same condition as above but happens when the board is laying on the wide face.

And "cupping" is...? SEE "CUPPING" HERE.

johnrem 04-09-2010 06:10 PM

even worse are the twisted studs

Cache 04-09-2010 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnrem (Post 426462)
even worse are the twisted studs

No such thing as a twisted stud in my world. The "Cut Pile" fairy magically twinkles them away and they come back as straight and true 15" cripples and blocks.:thumbup:

Joe Carola 04-10-2010 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tonglebeak (Post 419738)
Title should say it all. Went ot stand my wall up, and realized one of the studs is crowning horribly. I face nailed the top plate. It's a king stud for a door opening. If I face nailed the top half of the stud (that is straight) to the jack stud, will toenailing the bottom of the stud remove the crown?

When you have a stud with a bad crown in it notching the stud does not straighten the stud at all. How could it? You now have two sections with a crown. Do the right thing and remove it and put a new one in. Especially since your hanging a door on it. Why start out with something that's not straight.

Willie T 04-10-2010 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe Carola (Post 426624)
When you have a stud with a bad crown in it notching the stud does not straighten the stud at all. How could it? You now have two sections with a crown. Do the right thing and remove it and put a new one in. Especially since your hanging a door on it. Why start out with something that's not straight.

When, as a GC - not just a framer, you face a job that is due to drywall tomorrow, and a bowed (crowned) stud is discovered, it quickly becomes an issue of expediency and money. Especially if it is a bathroom plumbing wall or one with several runs of wire through it. You have neither the time nor the money to tear out half the plumbing and sometimes all the wiring and have it all redone just to straighten a section of stud.

And if this was somehow possible, to 'do the right thing', all that work would have to also be reinspected.

No, you take the age-old route of straightening the stud in place. If it is all that much of a crown, you cut the stud in several places, and reinforce it.

Joe Carola 04-10-2010 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 426697)
When, as a GC - not just a framer, you face a job that is due to drywall tomorrow, and a bowed (crowned) stud is discovered, it quickly becomes an issue of expediency and money. Especially if it is a bathroom plumbing wall or one with several runs of wire through it. You have neither the time nor the money to tear out half the plumbing and sometimes all the wiring and have it all redone just to straighten a section of stud.

And if this was somehow possible, to 'do the right thing', all that work would have to also be reinspected.

We're not talking about all that.


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