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Old 08-30-2008, 05:10 PM   #1
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Wet Rot Fix


I have wet rot at the base of my door trim that has also rotted the support wood behind it. There is only about 4-5 inches height wise that is rotted, but it has created this hole in my trim. Can I fill this with bondo or epoxy to fix this problem? Any help with direction appreciated.

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Old 08-30-2008, 05:26 PM   #2
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all things are possible... do you want to fix this or just cover it up. ....and let it get really bad?

can you post a pic or two?

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Old 08-30-2008, 08:27 PM   #3
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I have used both Bondo and the epoxy fillers, and under the right conditions, they can work great. My concern though, would be what caused this rot, and are you going to do something to prevent this in the future. The epoxy filler would be the better of the two, as long as there is good wood for it to "bite" into. As Big Bob suggested, a photo of the rotted area would be helpful.

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Old 08-30-2008, 10:04 PM   #4
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The area on the bottom trim is exposed to a lot of water from the pool and rain. It's an old house and this was never corrected when we moved in two years ago. Someone had put wood trim around the doors and never sealed it. We will be replacing this area someday but for now I just want to correct and hold off damage...

Here are the pics

Pic 1
Pic 2
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Old 08-31-2008, 08:03 AM   #5
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You can cut out as much of the rot as you can bondo, paint and it will last for quite a while if you stop the water from getting in.
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Old 08-31-2008, 08:14 AM   #6
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Yes, the bondo may work, but the wood must be completely dry first. When I have made repairs to wood, where there is still sound wood under, I have put screws into the good wood, and tightened them a bit below the finished surface line. This way, it will give the bondo more to "bite" and hold better.
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Old 08-31-2008, 09:17 AM   #7
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Thank you for good pictures.

appears as if bottom of casing had been replaced at one time.
They probably left some rot behind and left you to try to fix it the right way later on.

It looks like now is that later on.

This project could take a good carpenter will tools and materials at hand a half a day (including prime coat new work) $220 to $275

if hidden damage discovered: Jamb leg or part of (purchase of leg required), R&R T-hold add $75 to $175. Availability ... travel time +

The above are side work handyman type #'s or line items on a larger WDO project from a small contractor working with Realtors. Down-south...gas at $ 3.65 and bread on sale for $.89.

Call a local Big Box store and get a Quote on their install of New pre-hung door you buy from them. adder for (Remove and reset storm door.) or u buy new. ( I am not recommending them...like Forest Gump's box of chocolates...you never know what your going to get)
add casing and paint u do.

Crunch your numbers and decide.

If you feel you have the skill and tools to chase the rot...get it all...This site will provide you with the knowledge and advice on ways to do it.
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Old 08-31-2008, 10:13 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koshi9 View Post
I have wet rot at the base of my door trim that has also rotted the support wood behind it. There is only about 4-5 inches height wise that is rotted, but it has created this hole in my trim. Can I fill this with bondo or epoxy to fix this problem? Any help with direction appreciated.

I assume you are talking about the brick molding that trims the exterior of the door and the lower part of the door jam. Make sure that each of the 3 hinges has a long screw (3+ inches) into the framming. Also insure the latch side jamb is screwed thru into the framming. I say this because I have seen too many doors installed by nailing thru the brick molding only. When I make this repair I remove all of the brick mold and discard. I cut the jamb just below the bottom hinge and cut the latch side jamb at the same highth (cut it square to the jamb with a 45 degree up angle (long point of the 45 to the outside)with a circular saw set at a depth to just cut thru the jamb). Go to a good lumber yard (not big box), they will carry replacement jambs that will match your existing. They might have the jamb stock in PVC. Also buy enough PVC brick mold to do the door. Cut the new jamb stock to the length with the 45 at the top and install with shims and screws. The lower end of the jamb does not support any weight if you have screwed the jambs as I stated earlier. Cut and install the PCV brick mold. Fill holes, caulk and paint. It will last a long time.
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Old 08-31-2008, 07:08 PM   #9
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We eventually want to just knock all the sliders out and either replace them or add doors- but for now I'm thinking we should try the bondo. Hate to spend the money on replacing the door jam when we're going to rip it all out (when the economy gets better!)

I have no clue what rjniles means in his post- but thanks
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:04 AM   #10
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OOOps..

Your close-up photos and "door" in 1st post fooled me.

This appeared to me to be a swinging 5001 door with insulated storm door.

The side build out now makes sense ... they closed this in to fit the slider provided.

Know that the new sliders you will one day get will have a higher t-hold and not as prone to water intrusion.

Chase the rot...dig out all you can...the microbes you leave will continue the process so try to get it all. Clean-up with vacuum..treat remaining exposed wood with (Timbor...borate)or soak area with wasp spray( it acts like kerosene in an aerosol can) [this may get to the microbes that are left and buy you more time before the rot returns...get it right and the rot will not come back.

Let the area dry...help it with leaf blower...(heat gun not recommended if you used wasp spray).

Dry fit PT wood blocks you cut to fit the area you removed.
I like to leave room at the bottom for lots of caulking. Extra protection from water wicking. adhesive /epoxy and screws where you can... pre- drill if small blocks so they don't split.

bondo as needed...etc...

sorry for any confusion...

if you need more details let us know.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:55 AM   #11
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Any time I am fighting with rot, I use a long grinding/rasp bit in my drill, so I can get all the rot. Its a lot quicker than using a screw-driver or other tools.
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Old 09-01-2008, 12:34 PM   #12
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Thanks- that's helpful. Bob, what do you mean by "PT wood blocks?" Can I get these at home depot? How should I fasten them in? I'm not sure how much door jam is left at the bottom.
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Old 09-01-2008, 06:18 PM   #13
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PT is shorthand for pressure treated.

Any scrap wood you have around the house... that you can make blocks?, or ask the handy neighbor if they have some short pieces of 1by or 2x PT in their wood bin..

if you can't beg or borough small pieces, buy a 1x4 8' PT and a 2x4 8' PT.. the scrap= what you don't use now may come in handy down the road.

To name it is to know it: Your slider has an AL frame, the parts on each side is called a jamb leg/ the top a header jamb. The support wood behind the jamb ..framing jack studs.. in....your case it appears additional wood was added as spacers to work with a larger framed opening.

Your jambs should be screwed to the jack studs.. they should be nailed to the framing studs beside them and on and on. IF the above (should bez) are fact... you will be structurally a little weaker, but...ok...

Your mechanical fastening may end up being a little bit of a challenge.
You will know more when you get the rot out.

The blocking that you add ...is serving more or less as a filler so you can get a smooth solid surface to work with...bondo...paint...

If rot damage turns out very minor... ( not real professional, but you could use expanding spray foam)... let it cure...trim with a hot old butcher knife...coat with bondo..paint... The foam may shrink in time.

I could not tell if the 3/4 round trim had damage.. cut and splice or R&R the solid leg 1 8' stick /// your casing to the right appeared to have had the bottom six inches replaced before.. you could buy a better match...best if you could make a new pieces out of PT... ( that may be another thread...)

Think about water wicking,,, also seal bottom edges when you can

Wood + water = problems... wood + water + concrete ='s more problems

I do apologize again for the confusion early in this thread..

please lets us know if you need more info.

Last edited by Big Bob; 09-01-2008 at 06:20 PM.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:19 PM   #14
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Very helpful. I'm on a learning curve here but I'm storing all this.

Water wicking? What is the best way for me to seal the bottom trim against the cement? I am replacing the old trim with the PVC stuff. Wood does not belong anywhere outside in FL- cannot believe they put it out there. The rot looks pretty minimal- perhaps four inches in height and part of the jam. Thanks
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:12 AM   #15
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Koshi:

On thing you might want to consider to stop further deterioration is borate rods. Borates are a natural fungicide that kills the wood rot fungus (called "Serpula Lacrymans"). Because borates are highly soluble in water, if the wood gets wet, the borate rod dissolves, releasing borate into the wood. That borate will disperse through wet wood quickly and even in dry wood will eventually penetrate the entire cross section of the wood to prevent further wood rot. You can repair the rotted areas before or after the borate has migrated throughout the wood.

Typically, borate fungicides are sold as solid rods meant to be installed into holes drilled into the wood, or as liquids that are painted onto the affected wood. Ideally, it's best to install borate rods drilled into holes in the healthy wood, and apply liquid borate fungicides to that hole before inserting the borate rod and plugging the hole.

Google "Boracol" to find sources selling liquid borate fungicide or "Impel rods" or "Cobra rods" to find information about and sources selling solid borate rods.

Borates fungicides are popular amongst owners of log homes because borates are the ONLY fungicide that will penetrate the entire cross section of a log to protect the whole thing from both the wood rot fungus and from wood eating insects like termites and carpenter ants. Most of the places selling borate based fungicides will be supply houses that cater to people that own log homes or people that have contracts to maintain wooden telephone and hydroelectric poles.

One 6 mm X100 mm (1/4 inch diameter by 4 inches long) Impel rod in that door frame would stop any further wood rot. You just drill a 1/4 inch diameter hole, insert the borate rod, and then plug the hole with a soft plastic plug you push in or a hard plastic plug you screw in. Best to paint the inside of the hole with Boracol wood preservative first, tho. The borates penetrate quickly thoughout the wet wood to kill any fungus.

Borates are toxic to fungii, but they're not at all harmful to mammals. We mammals can just about eat borates and not get sick. The Borax you find in the laundry aisle of your local supermarket is an unrefined form of borate fungicide. Even drilling a hole in that door frame and packing Borax into that hole and sealing it shut would help prevent any further wood rot.

http://www.sasco.ca/

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