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Old 12-30-2010, 03:49 PM   #1
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Very basic door hardware question


Forgive the very basic question...

I'm putting a new knob and deadbolt in our very old basement door... it's an irregular shaped door, otherwise I'd just get rid of it.

Anyhow, the doorknob will be easy enough - I'll have to make a bigger hole... but the other piece of hardware is one of those really old deadbolts which necessitated an irregular cut into the door frame.

So my question... should I take this monster out, and use the existing hole in the door for the new deadbolt, which would necessitate repairing the hole in the doorframe? Or should I just leave it in there and cut a new hole for the new deadbolt?

If I cut a new hold, can I squish it between the two existing holes (there is about 12cm of space), or is it bad to crowd them together?

Thanks for any help!

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Old 12-30-2010, 06:30 PM   #2
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Very basic door hardware question


Can you post a picture?

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Old 12-30-2010, 10:09 PM   #3
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Very basic door hardware question


Deadbolt on top, door knob on bottom, and a third gouge in the door frame where presumably another old lock used to be.
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Old 12-30-2010, 10:25 PM   #4
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The position of your new deadbolt lock should be between 40’’ to 44’’ from the bottom of the door and adjust the position a bit if required so it won’t interfere with the other lock.

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Old 12-31-2010, 09:35 AM   #5
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I looks to me that you could remove the old one and patch the door and jamb then place the new dead bolt in a new location.

Patching the door and jamb well is tough to tell you how to do but try to use as much real wood and "gorilla" glue as possible then fill in the smaller gaps with a two part putty (Bondo). File and sand it up nice. Should look fine for a basement door and jamb. There are as many ways to do this as there are guys to do it.

By placing the new deadbolt in virgin material you make it as strong as possible and chiseling the plates will be cleaner and easier.
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Old 12-31-2010, 03:28 PM   #6
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Very basic door hardware question


Unless this is a very tall door, these locks look like they're installed very low.
I'd close the lower hole completely. Move the knob lock to the current deadbolt position. Install the deadbolt above that.
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Old 12-31-2010, 03:59 PM   #7
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Very basic door hardware question


Thanks for the replies so far.

Attached is a new picture of the frame, now with the old deadbolt removed. As you can see, the frame is a mess.

I am tempted to put the new deadbolt higher, and into "untouched" material in the frame, as per several of the suggestions. Is it okay to drill a hole adjacent to (or close to) the window in the door, however?

As for repairing the holes already present, am I correct in assuming that I should avoid putting even the lower handle into a "repaired" area of the frame, as it will result in a weaker overall lock?
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:26 PM   #8
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Because you have a window in your door you also have to consider someone breaking and entering into your home via window even though you have a dead bolt installed. They only have to reach in and turn the knob from your dead bolt and open the door or if they aren’t smart enough will climb through the broken window. Your best bet would be 1) replace the door with a solid panel door and either repair or replace existing trim 2) install a new dead bolt as discussed and replace or repair trim 3) cover your glass with a safety glass film which you can install yourself and install a new dead bolt with a interior removable key and replace or repair trim.
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Old 01-03-2011, 01:29 PM   #9
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Very basic door hardware question


Quote:
Originally Posted by km3t View Post
Thanks for the replies so far.

Attached is a new picture of the frame, now with the old deadbolt removed. As you can see, the frame is a mess.

I am tempted to put the new deadbolt higher, and into "untouched" material in the frame, as per several of the suggestions. Is it okay to drill a hole adjacent to (or close to) the window in the door, however?

As for repairing the holes already present, am I correct in assuming that I should avoid putting even the lower handle into a "repaired" area of the frame, as it will result in a weaker overall lock?
The frame has one piece out where the catch from the deadbolt was. The rest of the missing pieces are on the trim. Replace that and fill in the deadbolt recess and you're fine.
You can install the deadbolt next to the glass.
I second the suggestion to reinforce the glass. A simple piece of Lexan screwed to the interior frame of the door would do the trick.

.."am I correct in assuming that I should avoid putting even the lower handle into a "repaired" area of the frame, as it will result in a weaker overall lock?"
I would avoid the deadbolt part of the frame.
Ron

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