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toni 08-07-2007 02:37 PM

unsure
 
I'm new to the forum but I hope i can get some advise.
I am getting ready to do some remodeling and realized that the ceiling joists in my living room (approx. 23'x32') are sagging about an inch and a half in the center. the span for the ceiling joist is about 23' and the joists are pulling away at the ends. the ceiling joists and rafters are 2"x6" with an integral garage beneath the living room and attic above. is this common? is there a simple fix? also there is a drop ceiling in the living room. thanks!

Mike Swearingen 08-07-2007 10:40 PM

Unfortunately, no, that is not "common", and no, there isn't a "simple fix".
Have a licensed General Contractor or engineer inspect and recommend solutions.
Good luck!
Mike

Ron6519 08-09-2007 10:54 AM

You cannot have a 2x6 span 23 feet. This sounds like someone removed a wall somewhere in the middle of the span.
Agree you need professional help, and I would expedite it.
How long have you lived there? Is this a recent issue? I don't know where you would even get a 2x6 23 feet long. Are these 2x6's continuous beams from one side to the other or are they two that meet and overlap at some point. If they overlap, that's where the support wall was removed.
Ron

Clutchcargo 08-09-2007 01:40 PM

Since there's attic above and your going to renovate, this might be a good time to cathedral the ceilings.

toni 08-10-2007 11:10 AM

Thanks for the advise. To answer some of your questions, yes these are 2x6's and they are actually 23' 6" continuous length with no splices and no signs of a wall that had been removed. The house was built in 1966 and the only support for the ceiling joists are verticle 1x4's running from the joists to the rafters, two per joist a third of the way in from each end, and a cross tie on every other set of rafters. Is this common, and if this sounds so absurd how did it ever pass building inspections?

Clutchcargo 08-10-2007 12:16 PM

A simple and cheap fix would be to support (hang) the 2x6s from above; the ridge board or at least someplace high up on the rafters. You will still need a structural someone in there to give that idea a look.
Good Luck

jiggyjack 08-10-2007 06:31 PM

WOW in '66 one would think that they knew better. One relatively cheap fix would be to put a decrotive beam running perpendicular to the ceiling and jack the joists up as needed.

troubleseeker 08-11-2007 03:11 PM

Definately listen to the previous guys here, you need to have an engineer take a look, as this is a seriousl structural problem here. No one should have even considered that kind of span for a 2 x 6.

Sorry, Clutchcargo, but hanging this from the ridge board or roof rafters is not a viable solution. two wrongs do not make a right. Just for your info, a ridge board is not a structural element. Unlike a ridge beam, which is designed to carry the length of the span and be supported on each end with a post , a ridge board is just a convenient element to line up and nail rafters to.

Clutchcargo 08-11-2007 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 57264)
Sorry, Clutchcargo, but hanging this from the ridge board or roof rafters is not a viable solution. two wrongs do not make a right. Just for your info, a ridge board is not a structural element. Unlike a ridge beam, which is designed to carry the length of the span and be supported on each end with a post , a ridge board is just a convenient element to line up and nail rafters to.

I saw them do that on one of those home improvement TV shows where someone removed a structural wall and left the problem for the future home owners. There was probably more to it than what they showed.

jogr 08-13-2007 01:41 PM

It's possible that this is a built on site "engineered" truss design though the sagging shows that it is inadequate. Definitely get an engineer involved. He may have a relatively painless fix that involves strengthening the original "truss" design with additional supports within the attic area rather than from below - which I think is what clutchcargo was also saying.


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