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Old 01-15-2012, 05:59 PM   #1
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uneven RIP cut


Thanks again to everyone for the Crown molding info! I'm totally getting it done well!

NOW I have a question that I wonder if there is an solution someone has figured out.

I have an upper cab run that needs a filler but the cabs are not 100% parallel to each other off by 1/8"

visually because there is a pantry on the left and a 30" cab on the right of the gap you can't tell that there is a 1/8" difference but I need to fill this for a few reasons which I won't go into.

The challenge is how do I set up a table saw to rip this solid hickory filler piece so it ends up 30" long and 4" wide on one end and 3 7/8" wide on the other?


????? thanks!
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Last edited by petros151; 01-15-2012 at 06:05 PM.
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Old 01-15-2012, 06:17 PM   #2
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uneven RIP cut


Clamp a straightedge to the piece and run your circular saw along the straightedge.

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Old 01-15-2012, 07:38 PM   #3
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This works well if you don't mind two brad holes in the finish---table saw method

Rip a piece of plywood scrap a bit wider than the filler--Don't move the fence--

Set the filler onto the scrap---good side to the fence---waste hanging over the blade side--

Pin it down with two brads--push it through the table saw---perfect cut.
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Old 01-15-2012, 07:46 PM   #4
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This is the 'evil o'mike'----

It is not wise to suggest a technique that requires advanced skills like free handing wood through a table saw----(which we all know can cause serious injury when something goes wrong)

I'm no angel--I've done it---but I sure would not suggest it to a new guy on his first day---

There are safe methods --so let's try to suggest the safest and best when ever possible---Mike--
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Carola View Post
Mike,

Posts like that telling DIY'ers to freehand cut with a tablesaw should be deleted. You do what you want because you're the moderator but since your here and addressing the post, you could also delete it so no other DIY'ers reads it and does try it.What do you have to loose by deleting it?

Obviously you can't delete all bad posts, but since you are here reading this one, you do have the choice to do so for safety reasons. If it's deleted , there's no chance on someone else reading it and thinking about it....if you don't there is a chance people will. No harm in deleting such dangerous posts.

There are alot of things that diy'ers can try themselves being inexperienced. Playing around with power tools is not one of them.
MANY THANKS

I agree from what little experience I have with table saw it is best to advise great caution for newcomer. LUCKILY FOR ME, I had a friend who thought he was a hotshot on a table saw and buzzed off the tip of a finger and I NEVER forget that. I also had a kickback once when I DID try a free hand once ( it looked so simple!) but now I know better.

I am going to have to try to understand all the advice and think about it carefully. A Jig sounds like the way to go.
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:41 PM   #6
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Instead of ripping the filler on a taper, I'd first look into loosening a couple of screws in the wall cabinet and fitting a parallel piece in the space. A block of scrap and a couple tapered shims should be enough to nudge the cabinets apart enough to get the filler in.
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Last edited by loneframer; 01-15-2012 at 09:43 PM.
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:56 AM   #7
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There are these things called planes which are very safe and very quiet.
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loneframer View Post
Instead of ripping the filler on a taper, I'd first look into loosening a couple of screws in the wall cabinet and fitting a parallel piece in the space. A block of scrap and a couple tapered shims should be enough to nudge the cabinets apart enough to get the filler in.
I looked at the situation here is what it up. See pics.

there is a window and then the wall cab and base cab under and then pantry.

The base cab and the pantry meet and are perfect no gap. The gap occurs where the wall cab and pantry "meet" this gap occurred because I needed to place the wall cab at a point the same distance as another wall cab you can't see which is on the R side of the window. So these two wallcabs are looking balanced around the window (which is the sink window)

so I can't alter the angle of the wall cab (on the L) because it will show as offf against the window frame which is going to be stared at being a sink window,

I can't alter the pantry because then there is a gap between it and the base cab. Right now it looks visually perfect you can't notice the gap difference between the wall cab and the top of the pantry. So it seems the angle rip cut is my only choice to keep it all looking good.

make sense?
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:17 AM   #9
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Rough cut lumber - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

This link will show you some fancy clamping jigs for edge cutting---

Read my earlier post---do you have a table saw? If you do make a plywood rip--leave the fence set--tack the filler to the plywood rip--good side on the plywood--cut marks exactly on the edge of the plywood rip---

No table saw? A router with a straight cutting pattern bit will do the same thing---
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:32 AM   #10
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Rip to 4", scribe the line, belt sand.

And I agree with lone...Id try to pull it together first.

Last edited by 12penny; 01-16-2012 at 08:35 AM.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:32 AM   #11
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Petros - Makes sense.

Do you have access to a table saw?
use mike's idea or the jig I posted.

A circular saw, Jig saw or whatever else?
Use Titanoman's suggestion of attaching it to plywood, attaching a straight-edge and cutting it.

If you use Abracaboom's idea and plane or a belt sand it would be easier to cut most of the excess off with first then plane or sand down to the line.
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Old 01-16-2012, 06:28 PM   #12
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you guys are all right. the tapering jig will work either store bought or shop made. there are several woodworking books and magazines that have plans for shop made taper jigs

i do the same thing tito does all the time, which is freehand however this is not a method to use by diyer's . yes its dangerous but you must know exactly what you are doing and have a very steady hand. almost all carpenters are expected to be able to do this however if they cant no big deal. mind you im also a guy who is uncomfortable working on a table saw that DOES have a guard on it as i cant see what im cutting, and ive had more near misses than i can count on both hands and no near misses without a guard.. btw i still have all my fingers and thumbs
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk View Post
you guys are all right. the tapering jig will work either store bought or shop made. there are several woodworking books and magazines that have plans for shop made taper jigs

i do the same thing tito does all the time, which is freehand however this is not a method to use by diyer's . yes its dangerous but you must know exactly what you are doing and have a very steady hand. almost all carpenters are expected to be able to do this however if they cant no big deal. mind you im also a guy who is uncomfortable working on a table saw that DOES have a guard on it as i cant see what im cutting, and ive had more near misses than i can count on both hands and no near misses without a guard.. btw i still have all my fingers and thumbs
I think everyone incl Mae-Ling is giving advice that is meant to be and is helpful

I am sure Mae-Ling did not mean any harm. HOWEVER, I agree that on a board like this suggesting to a new comer newbie amateur DYI-r anything that carries a heavy risk like losing a finger (which free hand table saw cutting does carry) it is very helpful to the newbie to hear that this is not a good idea to try so thanks I think everyone did a fine job of protecting myself and any one who searches for crown molding will I think get a great education on some techniques and sound safety advice.

Thanks from me!
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:03 PM   #14
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uneven RIP cut


Geez! Loosen a few dang screws and slip in a perfectly parallel piece of filler, then re-tighten. The cabinets should be parallel to one another anyway.... why make them off even an eighth?
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:18 PM   #15
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Rip to 4", attach a straight edge along the desired finish line (double faced tape will do) use a flush trim router bit either hand held or on a table

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