DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   Trussed rafters w/ cut truss chords (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/trussed-rafters-w-cut-truss-chords-119311/)

sacseven 10-05-2011 05:47 PM

Trussed rafters w/ cut truss chords
 
3 Attachment(s)
Trussed rafter type roof. I feel dumb asking, but I thought one was not supposed to cut the trusses. Am I mistaken and these are not truss chords?

DangerMouse 10-05-2011 05:50 PM

No, you should not cut them. Are you asking or saying someone cut some that you know about?
I'm a bit confused by your question?

DM

kwikfishron 10-05-2011 06:08 PM

I don’t see any trusses.

DangerMouse 10-05-2011 06:34 PM

I only saw the drawing last time I was here. hmmmmmmm

DM

sacseven 10-06-2011 06:11 PM

Something has been cut, I guess I would like to know if it appears to be structural?

kwikfishron 10-06-2011 07:06 PM

I see random length ceiling joist sitting on a wall and the adjacent room with a lower ceiling. It doesn’t look like anything structural was cut (to me anyway). It looks like it’s always been that way.

Wildie 10-07-2011 11:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 743549)
I see random length ceiling joist sitting on a wall and the adjacent room with a lower ceiling. It doesnít look like anything structural was cut (to me anyway). It looks like itís always been that way.

I would agree with you! The butts that are circled in the photo are the ends of the raised ceiling joists.
if I were framing this, I would have placed a rim joist here, to prevent the joists from twisting, as they dry.

Gary in WA 10-07-2011 11:29 PM

You have rafters and ceiling joists, not trusses. The diagonal bracing are struts, holding up the purlins, Figs. 8 and 9: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...RMyCq7zQ737mAg

Gary

$49 Handyman 10-08-2011 05:00 PM

You have a stick-framed roof. The "missing" ceiling joists are important in my opinion as they help resist the downward and outward effects of roof thrust when the two main exterior walls aren't continuously tied together via the ceiling joists. If you have a dropped ceiling (like a utility room) between the main rooms, then you're asking the part of the studs above that height to help shoulder resistance load against roof spread. I'd nail a few 2x8's to the ends of the 'cut' joists and bridge that gap to create a continuous plate line link. Roofs spread loads downward and the exterior walls bear the brunt of this force. You're absolutely right to say 'something doesn't look right here.' Doesn't look right to me either. Also won't cost you much to remedy yourself as solid insurance against a future problem. The link below from an engineer shows pics that demonstrate roof thrust failure.

http://www.unified-eng.com/ch/thrust.html


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:20 AM.


Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved