DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   Trex Decking (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/trex-decking-7561/)

econdave 04-04-2007 01:47 PM

Trex Decking
 
would it be o.k to use stainless steel deck screws on composite deck to attach it to ACQ pressure treated lumber?

AtlanticWBConst. 04-04-2007 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by econdave (Post 39546)
would it be o.k to use stainless steel deck screws on composite deck to attach it to ACQ pressure treated lumber?

Absolutely....

Tho, I would suggest looking for the color coded screws (The screw heads are colored) to match the decking color. Cost more, but looks nice.

Here's a picture where we used 'Procell' decking with color matched grey 'square-head' stainless screws. The screws are hard to make out in the picture, but you may get the idea of how color head screws can look real nice with the decking....

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...IMG_0845-1.jpg

Brik 04-05-2007 11:13 AM

You can get decent color matched screws, good for acq, at McFeeleys.

http://www.mcfeelys.com/

handy man88 04-05-2007 02:22 PM

Yes, Stainless Steel screws are the best option with ACQ to prevent them from being eaten by the chemicals in the PT wood. Problem is that whenever you try to remove stainless steel screws, they will blow out the hole where your composite decking is.

Coated and colored deck screws though, work a bit better because the way the flutes are designed, they hold the boards down better and don't destroy boards if you need to remove/reuse them down the line for whatever reason. Stainless steel is corrosion resistant, not corrosion proof.

Make sure the bolts you use on ACQ are hot dipped or stainless also.

Jeekinz 04-10-2007 01:31 PM

I used galv. spiral shank nails for my deck. The nailhead pretty much gets burried in the material.

chalk_hill 10-06-2008 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeekinz (Post 40347)
I used galv. spiral shank nails for my deck. The nailhead pretty much gets burried in the material.


Just hope you never have to replace any boards ... :whistling2:

Can you buy hot-dipped spiral shank? My experience with the electroplated galv nails is htat after a couple of years they look about the same as regular framing nails when extracted. Moisture rests on the embedded fastener head then makes its way down the fastener shaft. YMMV

nailerman 10-07-2008 10:10 PM

hot dipped or SS spiral nails
 
Ring shank nails are available in hot dipped galvanized or stainless steel for deck applications. A nailscrew is a new decking fastener that is HDG. They are nailed in but be can be backed out with a screw gun. Most have philips or square heads:thumbsup:

chalk_hill 10-07-2008 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nailerman (Post 169500)
Ring shank nails are available in hot dipped galvanized or stainless steel for deck applications. A nailscrew is a new decking fastener that is HDG. They are nailed in but be can be backed out with a screw gun. Most have philips or square heads:thumbsup:

Interesting. Collated?

nailerman 10-08-2008 08:01 AM

Yea..they come in strip and coil

Jeekinz 10-08-2008 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chalk_hill (Post 168949)
Just hope you never have to replace any boards ... :whistling2:

I didn't plan on building the deck so it was "servicable". The ring shank nails bite more than the spiral shank shown below. The small round head is nearly invisible after all is said and done. They were actually recommended by an Evergreen retailer a five or so years ago. Never needed to rip a board up and the decking is as secure as it was when I first installed it.

http://images.lowes.com/general/n/na...g_spiral_n.jpg

Sorry, only good pic I had o my pc.
http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n...z/NewGrill.jpg

nailerman 10-08-2008 02:15 PM

Very nice deck. The nailscrew gives the holding power of a screw, while offering the productivity of a nail. Unfortunately, service/maintenance will always be an issue whether it's 1 year or 10. See picture below.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2324/...3f9fa7a1_m.jpg

chalk_hill 10-09-2008 07:21 AM

Can these fasteners be placed with a screw gun too? I like the production advantages of pneumatics but in situations where you need positive placement (plank ends, balusters etc) I need a matching fastener that can be carefully inserted.

Depth control is important too. Burying the fastener does not yield the uniform look I prefer for a high quality installation.

FWIW I have experimented with placing Trex with galv. finish (trim) gun nails. Those tiny heads disappear! The material is so stable (compared to wood) that I never saw any movement afterward. Not an approved method for decking however.

nailerman 10-09-2008 08:11 AM

They are not designed to be installed with a screw gun. Bulk/hand drive composite screws are available for this. Usually you can pick up 5# boxes at HD or Lows.

Most tools offer on board depth adjustments to help keep things flush.

Trim heads or standard heads are available to give a few different options based on preference.

chalk_hill 10-09-2008 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nailerman (Post 169995)
They are not designed to be installed with a screw gun. Bulk/hand drive composite screws are available for this. Usually you can pick up 5# boxes at HD or Lows.

Most tools offer on board depth adjustments to help keep things flush

I am well versed in the theory. In practice; different densities in framing members and air pressure in the tool results in a variation that doesn't match a screw-fed installation.

Composite planks have to be fastened precisely at ends or splitting results. It doesn't look good to have a different head at the end of each plank, and different manufacturers have different colors too.

Homeowners are happy to live with their own :oops:... but not mine.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:25 AM.