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bikerider138 12-06-2010 01:02 PM

Suggestions for a 12ft wide wood gate?
 
I hope carpentry is the right section for this. I have a 12ft wide gate on the side of my house (as part of a fence around the back yard) It is shot. However, it does have two nice 4x4 posts in concrete (that the gate is attached to) that are still very solid. And they will be the base for the new gate. It swings open in two pieces. One shorter than the other. I want to make two 6ft sides. However, I don't really have a solid design for this. The current design isn't going to cut it. I would much appreciate it if any of you could give me suggestions (especially pictures) of a good solid gate design that will hold up well. I will be in and out of this gate alot. I have a trailer that I use frequently on the side of the house.

Nick DIY 12-06-2010 02:10 PM

How tall are your posts?

hoz49 12-06-2010 02:52 PM

Cross bracing is most important. Use cable with a turnbuckle from the top of the hinge side diagonally to the bottom end of each gate. You can adjust the turnbuckle to keep the gate from sagging.

check here for pics

http://tinyurl.com/2fyp2cz

bikerider138 12-06-2010 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick DIY (Post 546681)
How tall are your posts?

5ft 6 in.

Nick DIY 12-06-2010 03:16 PM

Personally, I don't like the cable & turnbuckle design. I had several of these on my property when I moved in and they've all failed. Plus, IMO, they look tacky.
I prefer a "Z-Frame" design. The style is really up to you, but the diagonal bracing being the key.
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/g...arden-gate.gif

You could in theory go back and add in the turnbuckle later if you did get sag, but as long as your posts are well supported by fencing, you should be fine. If they're not, they will bow with the weight of the gate and you'll need to support them (notice the top rail in this picture).

DangerMouse 12-06-2010 03:38 PM

Well built gate there, Nick! ....and absolutely, diagonal bracing is a must!

Nothing worse than a saggy gate!..... unless it's a..... ummm... never mind.

DM

Nick DIY 12-06-2010 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DangerMouse (Post 546755)
Well built gate there, Nick! ....and absolutely, diagonal bracing is a must!

Nothing worse than a saggy gate!..... unless it's a..... ummm... never mind.

DM

Thanks, but not mine. I'd take some pictures of some of the one's that I've built at this property, but right now we're knee deep in the middle of a snow storm, so maybe in the spring time :biggrin:

kwikfishron 12-06-2010 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick DIY (Post 546740)
Personally, I don't like the cable & turnbuckle design. I had several of these on my property when I moved in and they've all failed. Plus, IMO, they look tacky.
I prefer a "Z-Frame" design. The style is really up to you, but the diagonal bracing being the key.
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/g...arden-gate.gif

You could in theory go back and add in the turnbuckle later if you did get sag, but as long as your posts are well supported by fencing, you should be fine. If they're not, they will bow with the weight of the gate and you'll need to support them (notice the top rail in this picture).

Now thats a setup you don't see every day.

bob22 12-06-2010 07:05 PM

All the money went into the gate; the fencing will be in the next appropriations bill.

bikerider138 12-06-2010 07:06 PM

I've never built a gate before. How would I attach the diagonal bracing inside the frame of the gate?

Termite 12-06-2010 09:19 PM

I'd seriously consider having a steel frame welded up for this gate and attaching your wood pickets to it. Whether it is one gate 12' wide or two 6' gates, a wood gate is going to sag over time. Granted, a turnbuckle does allow for adjustment in the future. A wood gate that wide is going to be flimsy. Any decent welder could quickly and easily make a gate frame from steel tubing stock or channel, and it won't be flimsy and it won't sag if he welds a diagonal brace in it. You can use self tapping screws to attach your pickets.

Just a thought from a KS redneck that has built many dozens of gates for livestock and privacy fences and such. :whistling2:

bikerider138 12-06-2010 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 547078)
12' wide or two 6' gates A wood gate that wide is going to be flimsy.


a 12 footer or two 6ers? I'm planning on two six footers.

High Gear 12-07-2010 12:25 AM

Lots of weight hanging off just 4x4's. steel posts would be ideal.

I built a gate using a 12' farm gate and attaches 1x6's on both sides to match a fence.

I used it for parking a trailer besides the garage , a wheel ( sold as an accessory ) helped support the locking side.

The gate wheel was on cement , not sure if it would work very well on the ground lots of weight to swing.

mrgins 12-07-2010 09:09 AM

I agree with the diagonal wood brace from the foot of the post to the top of the gate in conjunction with a turnbuckle in the opposite diagonal. You could use cable or a threaded rod. If you've ever visited Europe, you'd have seen gates bigger than this that are very old and still working and they are all wood

Nick DIY 12-07-2010 09:40 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is basic mock-up for the design for all of the gates on my property. They are strong and sturdy.
  • All treated lumber & rated screws
  • Sealed with high quality deck stain/sealer
  • 2x4 box frame and diagonal bracing
  • 2 x 2 balusters, tied to diagonal bracing for additional support
  • 3/8" Roundover on the outside edges of the box frame for aesthetics
  • Triple hinged to prevent warp-age
  • Pocket screwed where necessary
  • Dado'd tops & bottoms to inset balusters, drilled weep holes in bottom for drainage
You'll need to add some temporary supports to the posts, some sort of anchors and probably cables & turnbuckles into eyelets on the posts angles out away from the gates.

BTW, I don't disagree that a welded steel frame would be immensely stronger, but depending on the style you're looking for, may not be aesthetically acceptable.


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