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-   -   Stool and Apron Window Trim Style Advice (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/stool-apron-window-trim-style-advice-36472/)

DIYCarp 01-21-2009 08:24 AM

Stool and Apron Window Trim Style Advice
 
Hello All:

I am remodeling my daughters' bedroom and installing new baseboards and window trim. The sole window in her room is an Anderson casement window and the interiior trim currently is mitered wrap around trim.

I really like the interior room look of the stool and apron trim along with a nice header around a window. Unfortunately, in every example I've found thus far, for installing stool/aprons the window is a double-hung window. Question: Would installing window trim comprised of a header and a stool/apron around a casement window look goofy from a style standpoint?

I don't want to install something that looks goofy or off-base. :huh:

Then again, I have colonial type baseboards installed and was thinking the stool/apron/header would compliment the room.

Any advice is surely appreciated. Thanks! :thumbsup:

II Weeks 01-21-2009 08:36 PM

I dont think it would. Do what you want. Ive scene stools put on casements before especially for a girls room. she'll use it for stuff

AtlanticWBConst. 01-21-2009 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 216614)
Hello All:.

Hello.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 216614)
I am remodeling my daughters' bedroom and installing new baseboards and window trim. The sole window in her room is an Anderson casement window and the interiior trim currently is mitered wrap around trim.

I believe that you are referring to what sounds like like a "Picture Framed" casing arrangement using Colonial Molding (Colonial casing).

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 216614)
.... Question: Would installing window trim comprised of a header and a stool/apron around a casement window look goofy from a style standpoint?

Casement windows are trimmed out in both "picture-framed" arrangement and also traditional trim arrangement (Stool & apron). You can do what ever you would like to do, when it comes to the installation of the window casing. So, yes, if you feel that you would like to install an apron and stool at the bottom of the window, go for it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 216614)
I don't want to install something that looks goofy or off-base. :huh:

Me neither. Worse case scenerio: you install it, take a step back, not like it, get a second negative opinion....decide to remove it, and re-install the casing in picture-frame arrangement....

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 216614)
Then again, I have colonial type baseboards installed and was thinking the stool/apron/header would compliment the room.

Go for it.:thumbsup:

AtlanticWBConst. 01-22-2009 04:53 AM

Example:

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...IMG_0723-1.jpg

DangerMouse 01-22-2009 05:01 AM

nice examples Atlantic! i agree though, it would look fine, BUT... be sure there is enough room between sill and crank so you don't bang knuckles trying to open and close it. can you post pics when done? i'm in the same undecided situation.

DM

the roofing god 01-22-2009 07:02 AM

It`s simply a matter of taste,used to be everything got sills,probably been doing the picture frame style for 15-20 years now though,each customer makes that decision for themselves,haven`t had any complaints about bustin` knuckles on sills though

DIYCarp 01-23-2009 02:11 PM

Thanks a ton for the info Gents. Very helpful!

Atlantic...I appreciate the pic :thumbsup: Dang!, that's exactly the look I'm going for! Looks like a quality job to me and can only hope my results are as good. I like how the sash and the sill nose match...kind of ties it together. Is that nose a separate trim piece? Can't tell with my viewer.


I've been reading a bit about these casement windows and I see where Anderson (maybe others as well) use a tongue and groove sill plate. There's an Anderson window retailer about 10 miles from me. Said he has those type of sills in stock. Going to check them out tomorrow. I assume you can easily take the old sill out easily and the tongue just pops out and away no problem. Same way with installing the new tongue...just tap it into place once you made your cut?

Question though: the current window side jambs run flush to the underside of the current sill board at both sides. I'm assuming once I remove the current sill, I can just keep the length of the side jambs intact and notch out the new sill to run around the each jamb? Or should I cut the side jambs and run my new sill UNDER each side jamb and then extend the stool an inch or two out over the wallboard? which way is the strongest/best? I see on the web where the stool runs under the side jambs and then extends out. But I chatted with someone who claims to be an experienced carpenter who said I could save myself some trouble by just leaving the side length and notching out the stool accordingly. Not interested in cutting coreners (no pun intended). Just want to do it the right way the first time. Any thoughts, Atlantic?

Thanks, Guys.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-23-2009 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DIYCarp (Post 217932)
...Is that nose a separate trim piece? .

The stool (sill) is a piece of pre-primed stock, that had been routered to create a bullnose. That is why you see the wood grain on the edge.

The apron (section under the sill) was the same stock as the casing (fluted casing). FWIW - I never install fluted casing as an apron section, but the H.O. wanted it that way.

golfguru1 01-24-2009 09:31 AM

Atlantic,
In the picture you posted the trim work around the window reveal what material is it made out of? It it simply just MDF cut to fit or is it a special molding. Also when you installed the trim work did you remove the drywall around the window reveal so the new trim would not interfere with the window operation?


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