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-   -   "Standard" distance between 4x4's for Fence? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/standard-distance-between-4x4s-fence-70289/)

cody21 05-01-2010 11:13 AM

"Standard" distance between 4x4's for Fence?
 
We're about ready to start a FENCE build. We're going to dig 2' deep fence post holes and set them with Fence Post 'cement'. But were curious whether there is a "standard" that shold be used for the distance BETWEEN each Fence Post? This is a relatively flat yard that we're building this fence for.

(I looked for a "HOW TO" for building a FENCE and cou;dn't find anything here.)

Thanks !

Yoyizit 05-01-2010 12:34 PM

8' is one standard.
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/l...stallation.htm
Depending on your fence, each section can weigh 160#; you might need a helper.

kwikfishron 05-01-2010 12:40 PM

Not over 8’.

I will figure how many post and evenly space them so they usually end up 7’ something.

cody21 05-01-2010 12:43 PM

Thanks for your input peeps ...

Bob Mariani 05-01-2010 12:44 PM

many fence sections are 6'. When using 8' you need to be perfect for the post settings since you cannot get wider sections. Width of sections is determined by how they are built. many if 8' will sway and sag in the middle.

cody21 05-01-2010 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 436189)
many fence sections are 6'. When using 8' you need to be perfect for the post settings since you cannot get wider sections. Width of sections is determined by how they are built. many if 8' will sway and sag in the middle.

We aren't using pre-fab "sections" of fence. We're planning to install fence posts (4x4's), then a footer & then another (header?) board near the top -- then attach/nail individual 6' dog-eared redwood boards to those.

Thanks again.

Yoyizit 05-01-2010 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cody21 (Post 436142)
We're going to dig 2' deep fence post holes and set them with Fence Post 'cement'.

Don't forget to use some gravel at the hole bottom.

cody21 05-01-2010 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yoyizit (Post 436213)
Don't forget to use some gravel at the hole bottom.

Gotcha ... thanks

troubleseeker 05-01-2010 06:18 PM

For my money, anything over 7' (I use 6') is too long for the horizontal 2 x 4's. At 8', they will sag. Pay attention to fences as you drive around, and you will easily spot the ones built strictly for the cheapest cost. Be sure to pay attention to the suggestion about setting the bottom of the post on a few inches of drainage rock; whatever you do, do not put concrete in the bottom of the hole and set the post in it, then continue to fill the hole with concrete, creating what I call the "concrete death boot" for a wood post. Truth is, I despise wood posts set in concrete, preferring to backfill the hole with packed drainage rock. And splice the horizontal runners on a post, do not just get running lengths and join the with those crappy little metal butt joint connectors everyone uses.

Willie T 05-01-2010 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 436300)
For my money, anything over 7' (I use 6') is too long for the horizontal 2 x 4's. At 8', they will sag. Pay attention to fences as you drive around, and you will easily spot the ones built strictly for the cheapest cost. Be sure to pay attention to the suggestion about setting the bottom of the post on a few inches of drainage rock; whatever you do, do not put concrete in the bottom of the hole and set the post in it, then continue to fill the hole with concrete, creating what I call the "concrete death boot" for a wood post. Truth is, I despise wood posts set in concrete, preferring to backfill the hole with packed drainage rock. And splice the horizontal runners on a post, do not just get running lengths and join the with those crappy little metal butt joint connectors everyone uses.

My feelings, exactly. Couldn't have written it better myself. Why is it no one seems to understand not to encase that poor little post in a concrete tomb?.

Thurman 05-01-2010 08:16 PM

When I build a "stick built", built on site, wooden fence as you have described: I use bricks I have. I place a brick at the end/corner where a post will go, measure the distance between them, in inches, and divide by a number which will give you less than 96". Somewhat as "troubleseeker" stated. Then I place a brick at the new measurement I came up with, stand back and see if this spacing will look aesthetic (I found that word, which means "looks nice"). This way you will have even spacing between the fence post for people who can see it to view. Then you probably will have to trim your "header" boards, as you described, to fit between them a little tight to begin with. I also like to undercut the 4x4's for the headers, then use hot-dipped screws placed in pockets. HINT: Start somewhere near the back of the yard where the fence is not viewed as much. The closer you get to the area where it will be viewed the most- -it will look much better with experience. David

Gary in WA 05-01-2010 09:49 PM

Pressure treated is against bugs and fungi rot. Some p.t. wood is treated with a water resistant chemical, but not all. http://www.ufpi.com/literature/ptfaq-204.pdf AND #3: http://bct.nrc.umass.edu/index.php/p...ns-about-wood/

P.t. wood will suck up the water even with concrete on the sides/bottom: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

You need to treat it if in a moist environment-earth: http://www.thompsonswaterseal.com/advice/faq.cfm

A much better way: http://www.sustland.umn.edu/implemen..._footings.html


Be safe, Gary

vsheetz 05-02-2010 06:41 AM

As other have said - something in the ~6-7' range - if you hit a rock or something, you may need to move a post one way or the other a few inches.

I like to use metal posts in concrete rather than wood posts. Wood posts usually die before the fence. Metal posts will outlive the wood fence and allow for easy (relatively) refencing a couple three times in their life time.

cody21 05-02-2010 09:11 AM

Very good stuff here ... I *AM* curious why a contractor (read: Professional) we used to build a back side fence dug a 2' hole, pour in FENCE post cement, added water to mix the cement. It seems like you guys are saying he screwed that up. Not sure if he put in gravel at the bottom - I didn't see him do that part. I'll look at those links GBR ... thanks !

Gary in WA 05-02-2010 02:05 PM

With a wood post in the ground and exposed on the top-side to the elements, sun, rain, snow, wind- any water in the ground will wet the post below grade and mitigate to the top (dry) part. Capillary action, thermal conductivity, etc., because part is wet and part is dry (or dryer). The wood fibers are built to transmit water and nutrients this way in trees as they grow. The worst you can do with wood is burn or soak it in water, which is exactly why not to surround it with concrete. Concrete has a permeability rating of 3.2 per inch, so 2” would be that, or 1.6 perms, or placing a wrapping around the post, soaking it with water and SLOWLY getting rid of the water through draining or capillary action to the topside of post.
http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...XsmKgLLnUVWJHg



The gravel in the bottom is necessary to prevent frost heave and good drainage against rot from water: page 39: http://books.google.com/books?id=1gg...num=3#PPA31,M1

Aggregates prevent frost-heave: http://rockproducts.com/mag/rock_agg...prevent_frost/

Be safe, Gary


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